EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SERIES I

Emotional Intelligence – What is it anyway?
 
Emotional Intelligence – Series Part I
 
The term “Emotional Intelligence” is used today as if “everyone” knew what the term means with all of its ramifications. As I introduce the term and concept in our Atlanta Anger Management, Anderson and Anderson™ , Anger Management Classes very few people have actually heard the term and know what it means.

This Emotional Intelligence Series will try to investigate the term and expand on its meaning and practical applications in everyday life. Join in the investigation if you have anything to add, ask, or correct.

“Emotional Intelligence” the term, was coined and formally defined by John (Jack) Mayer of the University of New Hampshire and Peter Salovey of Yale University in 1990.  1

They expanded on the concept by Howard Gardner (1983) while at Harvard University that multiple intelligences may exist in humans including an aptitude for introspection and “personal intelligence.”

Mayer and Salovey joined with their fellow colleague David Caruso to create a Emotional Intelligence (EQ) measuring instrument they named Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

Also working in the field was Dr. Reuven Bar-On and by 1985 developed the concept of Emotional Quotient (EQ). He believed that our intelligence was made up both IQ but also of overlapping distinct attitudes and skills that he later defined into an instrument for measurement he called Emotional Quotient Inventory or for short EQ-i®

Of course there were many others all working separately on different concepts related to intelligence other than Intelligence Quotient (IQ). IQ had already been accepted and used in schools in many countries to measure students cognitive or rational aptitudes to determine “how smart” they were.

NOTE: This article is not a complete history of Emotional Intelligence. It is to open up the term to the “public” everyday person, so this portion is brief to keep things moving.

Daniel Jay Goleman is an author, psychologist, and science journalist who was writing for The New York Times (12 years) specializing in psychology and brain sciences. He studied and complied years worth of research in the field of psychological functioning and personal skills and in 1995 authored the book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. 2

As they say, “the rest is history”. The book was on the New York Times Best Sellers list for more than 1 1/2 years explaining that Emotional Intelligence existed with lots of research to back up the premise that EQ often is more important to the individual than one’s IQ as a determining factor for success in life.

There was a time when IQ was considered the leading determinant of success. In this fascinating book, based on brain and behavioral research, Daniel Goleman argues that our IQ-idolizing view of intelligence is far too narrow. Instead, Goleman makes the case for “emotional intelligence” being the strongest indicator of human success.  He defines emotional intelligence in terms of self-awareness, altruism,  personal motivation, empathy, and the ability to love and be loved by
friends, partners, and family members. People who possess high emotional  intelligence are the people who truly succeed in work as well as play, building flourishing careers and lasting, meaningful relationships. Because emotional intelligence isn’t fixed at birth, Goleman outlines how adults as well as parents of young children can sow the seeds. 3

So Mr. Goleman defines a set of skills: self-awareness, including control of one’s impulses, self-motivation, empathy and social competence in interpersonal relationships that determine one’s effectiveness in negotiating life.

Peter Salovey and Jack Mayer describe Emotional Intelligence as “the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional meanings, and to reflectively regulate emotions in a way that promote emotional and intellectual growth.” 4

For people who need anger management, Emotional Intelligence is a key in learning to increase self-awareness and control one’s impulses along with many other skill sets that we will be looking at in the upcoming article series.
 

Next in series (II)
 
Emotional Intelligence – What is it anyway? Part Two

 

George Anderson of Anderson and Anderson is a pioneer in the field of Anger Management and has Emotional Intelligence as one of the key four “anchors’ of his model of anger management curriculum. He now has become one of the forerunners in using Emotional Intelligence testing instruments such as the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 to help determine an individual’s strengths and weaknesses in Emotional Intelligence and provides coaching to help improve deficient areas. All Anderson and Anderson™ Certified Anger Management Providers (CAMF) are now trained in administering the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 through Anderson and Anderson™ .

Mr. George Anderson also uses it in his Disruptive Physicians work.
 
Richard Taylor also offers Emotional Intelligence coaching in Atlanta to the public
and can fly to your location or do phone/Skype consults for Individuals – Attorneys – Business – Corporations –  Government – Universities & Colleges – Hospital Staff (not Physicians).
 
CONTACT:
 
Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

A Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Trusted Name In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence
 
 
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1. P. Salovey and J.D. Mayer, “Emotional Intelligence”, Imagination, Cognition, and Personality, 9 (1990): 185-211.

2. Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (New York: Bantam, (1995)

3. Amazon.com Review
Source: http://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Intelligence-Matter-More-Than/dp/055338371X

4. J.D. Mayer, P. Salovery, and D. Caruso, Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCIET) User’s Manual (Toronto: Multi-Health Systems, 2002).

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