Lifestyle Factors Can Cut Heart Failure Risk After 65 By 1/2

Lifestyle Factors Can Cut Heart Failure Risk
After 65 By 1/2

By Kathryn Doyle

(Reuters Health) – Older people who walk briskly, are moderately active in their free time, drink moderately, don’t smoke and avoid obesity may be half as likely to develop heart failure as people who don’t engage in these healthy habits, a new study suggests.

Based on the findings, optimizing a few healthy lifestyle factors can cut heart failure risk in half, according to lead author Liana Del Gobbo, a research fellow at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts.

“A key finding is that physical activity among older adults does not have to be strenuous to reduce heart failure risk,” Del Gobbo told Reuters Health by email.

“We saw benefits for adults who walked at moderate or brisk pace (more than 2 or 3 miles per hour) and burned calories through leisure activity, like house or yard work, walking, engaging in outdoor activities, or other forms of physical activity, equivalent to about 30 minutes per day of moderate-intensity activity,” she said.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than five million people in the U.S. have heart failure, in which the heart fails to pump enough blood and oxygen to support the rest of the body. Heart failure can be treated with medication, a reduced-sodium diet and increased physical activity, but about half of those diagnosed with heart failure die within five years.

For the new study, researchers followed 4,490 men and women age 65 and older without initial signs of heart failure. The average age at the start of the study was 72.

For up to 21 years, with annual physical exams and questionnaires, the researchers collected data on study subjects’ diet, walking pace and distance, leisure activity, exercise intensity, alcohol use, smoking status, weight and waist circumference.

During the study, 1,380 people developed heart failure.

Walking “briskly,” or at least two miles per hour, taking part in calorie-burning leisure activities, modest alcohol intake of no more than one or two drinks per day, avoiding smoking and maintaining a healthy weight were all tied to lower heart failure risk.

Those who optimized at least four of these factors were half as likely to develop heart failure as those who only optimized zero or one of the factors, as reported in JACC: Heart Failure.

“At a population level, we especially need to work on encouraging adults to engage in physical activity,” she said.

The researchers accounted for other factors, like socioeconomic status, that could affect heart failure risk.

Surprisingly, specific dietary pattern was not tied to heart failure risk, and exercise intensity was less important than walking pace and leisure activity.

Researchers did see an increased risk of heart failure with higher salt intake, which “makes sense,” Del Gobbo said, because too much salt increases a person’s risk for high blood pressure, which is a key risk factor for heart failure.

Many “healthy lifestyle messages” about lowering heart attack risk also apply to heart failure, said Dr. David J. Maron, director of Preventive Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine in California, who coauthored a commentary on the new findings.

“We spend a tremendous amount of money in this country on heart failure-related events,” Maron told Reuters Health by phone. “Living a good life can help prevent a very expensive illness.”

“The amazing thing from this study is if you do these four behaviors that you can reduce your risk of heart failure by 50 percent,” he said. “It’s just an association, and doesn’t prove cause and effect,” but is still a powerful finding, he said.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1NM4h1I JACC: Heart Failure, online July 6, 2015.

RECAP: Formula to Live Longer
1. Walk at moderate or brisk pace (more than 2 or 3 miles per hour) for 30 minute
2. Drink moderately
3. Don’t smoke
4. Avoid obesity
5. Lower salt intake

 

Let look at avoid Obesity. That can be a tough one.
SAD diet = Standard American Diet. = Heart Attacks and Strokes.

Change to Lifestyle Of:

  1. No fried foods. Bad Oils.
  2. Oils to use sparingly. Avocado Oil for cooking. Uncooked: Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil & Flora Udo 3-6-9 Blend for smoothies. No other oils.
  3. Cut salt and sugar out completely. Use salt free seasonings. Easy.
  4. No red meat, settle for non-hormone Chicken only
  5. Fish – Only wild caught Sockeye Salmon, Freshwater Trout, Cod, Tuna, (See Video below)
  6. Spend 80% in Produce Department. Food on Plate Plan.
  7. Drink ½ your body weight in water unless medical advisor instructs differently.
  8. Read Labels. Stop eating/drinking any item with words you cannot pronounce. (Processed Foods, Chemicals, Fructose Corn Syrup, Trans Fats, More).
  9. No diet drinks. Usually contains artificial sweeteners that raise your blood sugar and leads to fat tire waist, bloating and Diabetes Type II. No energy/”healthy” drinks.
  10. No sports bars, diet bars, ice cream, no milk, less cheese (no cheese best)
  11. No white starches = no bread, white rice, pasta, treats
  12. Use Smoothies for 1-2 meals. Must: Vega brand Protein powder, Fiber (NOW Physillium Husk) and Essential Oils (Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil & Flora Udo 3-6-9 Blend) with low sugar fruit such as berries. Filtered water. See blogs for recipes. Keep carb count to 15-20 if possible and sugar count low (10). Add small handful spinach.
  13. People who reduce their intake of food live longer. Eat less than you do now.
  14. People who fast 2 days out of 7 lower their cholesterol significantly. Drink water on fast days with one 600 calories salad, no meat. Less salad dressing. or 3/5/12 Plan.
  15. Stop drinking alcohol. Too many carbs and calories. Reserve for special occasions. Limit to 2.
  16. Waist Size: Take your height and divide by two. Be equal or less than that. i.e. 5 Ft. 6 In. height = 66 inches/2 = 33” waist or less.
  17. Lifestyle: Laugh a lot. Focus on positives. Reduce stress. Stop arguing. Practice Emotion control.
  18. Lose weight by expending more calories then you consume.
  19. Visualize yourself at your reduced weight or look at “old” photos at ideal weight.
  20. Adopt this as a way of life. Eat to live.
  21. When you go for treat day, immediately resume healthier lifestyle.

Disclaimer: Seek your health care provider before changing exercise and/or diet. This information supplied as Public Service Announcement and for people in good health. Richard Taylor is not a nutritionist. Above comes from research and practical coaching to him from his team of consultants.

CONTACT:

Richard TaylorDirector Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
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Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

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