Law of Vibration – Bob Proctor

Law of Vibration – Bob Proctor

” We literally live in an ocean of motion.” – Bob Proctor

Understanding the #LawOfVibration is essential for a fulfilled life. Watch and change the way you are, how you see things, your control of your emotions. It affects your Health, Relationships, Wealth, even Selling of your idea, product or service. Learn to be in harmony with the Universal vibrations of the cosmos and world and fulfill your purpose. #atlangerman


Vibration-Levels-Of-Emotions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard TaylorRichard Taylor #atlangerman  @atlangerman
Owner/Director of Atlanta Anger Management is passionate about helping people be intelligent with their emotions!

To get to that place that Mr. Proctor speaks about in this video. The “space” between situation and response. We do have a choice in how we react to situations, people, events. Even our own thoughts and feelings.

Anger Classes and Private Sessions are offered.
In most cases we can help you quickly shift to that better place for more positive interactions and consequences.

Call Richard at 678-576-1913 or e-mail to get started
bringing in 2016 with a #BANG! And #CALMER

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Advertisements

EXTREME ROAD RAGE CBS46 REPORT

Road Rage: Misunderstandings turn dangerous with weapons involved

Posted: Nov 04, 2015 2:18 PM EST Updated: Nov 04, 2015 6:06 PM EST

ATLANTA (CBS46) –

With drivers in Atlanta ranked as some of the most discourteous on the road, commutes can turn into disputes.

When weapons are involved, a misunderstanding on the roadway can turn dangerous, and in the Atlanta area’s traffic, we’ve seen it happen all too often.

“Do you want to go home tonight?”

Richard Taylor with Atlanta Anger Management is an expert on rage.

“Is it worth it to get engaged with a driver who you don’t know has a gun or not?” Taylor said. “Do you want to eat tonight? Do you want to go home tonight? That becomes the question.”

Taylor said as we’re driving around the seemingly never-ending cluster of cars Atlanta is famous for incidents that drivers don’t like happen every day.

Some of those drivers come to see Taylor in his office daily and he sees news reports of angry people on the roads.

“They snap,” he said. “They’re losing their conscious ability to be reasonable and they just focus on the one person… That’s the big debate we have in the nation is over access to guns.”

Taylor said stress and anger play major roles in the road rage situation, but if you add a weapon into the mix and it can become a criminal case.

Incidents all too common

A witness to a road rage in Coweta County said, from what she saw, a suspect who pointed a gun at a car used the weapon as a first instinct.

CBS46 News

“Pulling a firearm, in just about every case, should be an absolute last resort and it seems like it was this guy’s first resort” the witness said.

In another incident, a baby was shot in the foot in what police determined was a dispute on the road in DeKalb County.

In the case of the aforementioned Corvette driver, she reportedly gestured to the car behind her to go around, and the driver of the Mustang opened fire.

So what can you to avoid road rage situations? Professionals suggest NOT flashing your lights and avoiding any sort of reaction to other drivers, including hand gestures.

Getting out of your car should never be an option, experts say.

If you’re prone to getting angry, officials say it’s best not to carry your gun in the car.

Copyright 2015 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

How To Drive Defensively

How to Drive Defensively

Adopting defensive-driving techniques can keep you safe on the road and may even save you money and your life! Many insurance companies reduce policyholders’ premiums if they maintain accident-free driving records or take an accredited course on defensive-driving techniques. If you want to learn how to drive defensively, follow these steps.

  1. Stay focused, keeping your hands on the wheel. Defensive drivers concentrate on the road, keeping their hands at the 10 o’clock-2 o’clock position. They don’t do other tasks while driving, some of which are illegal. These include:
    • Eating
    • Applying makeup
    • Holding a dog
    • Tending to a child
    • Operating a hand-held cell phone
    • Texting
  1. Keep your eyes moving. Continuously look in your mirrors and scan the road ahead, checking for hazards and slowing traffic so you can anticipate problems before they develop.
  2. Stay alert. Don’t drive if you’re tired, upset, or angry.
  3. Go with the flow. Most drivers know that speeding is a major cause of accidents, but driving too slow can be dangerous, too. Drive at speeds that most other vehicles are going.
  4. Use the 2 second rule on heavily traveled roads to maintain adequate spacing with the car in front of you.
    • Choose a fixed object on the road ahead of you.
    • Count “1 independence, 2 independence” when the car in front of you goes by the object. If you pass the same object before you’re done counting, slow down a bit. The 2 second rule helps reduce the chance of a rear-end collision when cars in front make sudden stops.
  1. Make yourself visible. Many accidents occur because drivers didn’t see the other car. There are a few simple ways to make your presence known, making the road safer for everyone. They include:
    • Turn signals: Use your turn signals to let other drivers know where you’re going. By using your blinkers, other drivers will be able to anticipate your actions and slow down safely.
    • Headlights: Turn on your headlights at dusk or anytime it is raining. This is more for other drivers to see you than for you to see the road. In some states it is illegal to drive without your headlights on while the windshield wipers are in operation.
    • Brake lights: Operational brake lights are a safety must. They warn cars behind you that you’re slowing down, signaling them to reduce speed, too.
    • Avoid blind spots: Don’t linger in areas where the driver in front of you can’t see you. Many people will only check their mirrors before making a lane change. If you’re lurking slightly behind and a lane away from another vehicle, assume that the driver of that car can’t see you. Either safely speed up or slow down to avoid this scenario, which often results in an accident. This is an important defensive-driving technique.
  1. Resist road rage. Aggressive drivers may infuriate you, but retaliating with similar tactics is dangerous. Take a passive approach in dealing with road rage. Use these strategies in specific road-rage scenarios:
    • Tailgaters: If the driver behind you is right on your bumper, tap the brakes a few times to let the driver know that he’s not maintaining a safe distance. If he stays on your tail, slow down gradually. Chances are the tailgater will eventually pass you.
    • Speeders: If you see a car speeding or aggressively changing lanes behind you, stay in your lane while maintaining your speed.
  1. Adapt to road conditions. Even light rain can produce dangerous conditions, particularly early in the season when the water picks up oil from the road surface, making it slippery. Tires lose their grip at higher speeds, so slowing down in inclement weather is a fundamental defensive-driving technique.
  2. Familiarize yourself with traffic rules. Refresh your memory by browsing a Department of Motor Vehicles pamphlet detailing the rules of the road. It provides guidelines on rights of way, road signs, traffic law, and contains tips on safe driving.
  3. Avoid Rear-Enders in Intersections: Move only when it is clear. Sometimes an intersection gets backed up with traffic.
    • If you’re the first car to go at green, make sure traffic on the other side of the intersection that you are moving into has cleared before you decide to go. This can prevent you from getting in a situation where you might get T-boned if you get stuck or stalled in an intersection.
    • Turning into an intersection: a lot of rear-end collisions happen when the driver behind you assumes you are going to complete the turn, even if traffic is backed up.
    • Give yourself enough room: if you must stop in an intersection, slow down carefully and keep distance from any other cars that have yet to complete the intersection. If the person behind you ‘flip-flops’ and rear-ends your car, you’ll save yourself the trouble the car in front of you is not involved. No fun having dents front And back.

Source:     http://www.wikihow.com/Drive-Defensively

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/atlangerman/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/atlangerman
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/atlangerman/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/atlangerman/
Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/atlanta-anger-management-atlanta
About.Me www.about.me/richardtaylorAAM

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Atlanta Is Rated The 2nd Least Courteous Drivers In US

AutoVantage Survey on Road Rage Identifies Atlanta as 2nd Least Courteous City in the US

Stamford, CT- May 12, 2014- When it comes to getting to and from work, a recent survey says Atlantans have it worse than citizens in just about any other city.

The 2014 In the Driver’s Seat Road Rage Survey identified Atlanta as having the second least courteous drivers across America’s largest cities. This represents an “increase” of two spots from the same survey in 2009.

Rankings were determined by measuring a wide array of driving actions that inhabitants admit to performing and acknowledge seeing, along with observations of their reactions to other drivers.

When compared to drivers in other cities,

Survey Participants in Atlanta are:

  • Most likely to admit purposely bumping another driver in reaction to perceived poor driving
  • Most likely to see another driver speeding
  • Most Likely to acknowledge tailgating someone else
  • 2nd most likely to see other drivers eating or drinking while behind the wheel

While drivers in Atlanta were identified as among the least courteous, Portland, OR was identified as having the most courteous drivers.

The survey’s best and worst cities were:

Least Courteous
2014 2009
Houston New York City
Atlanta Dallas
Baltimore Detroit
Washington DC Atlanta
Boston Minneapolis
Most Courteous
2014 2009
Portland Portland
Pittsburgh Cleveland
St. Louis Baltimore
San Francisco Sacramento
Charlotte Pittsburgh

“AutoVantage aims to provide peace-of-mind for our members, with world class technology that ensures rapid assistance in our customers’ time of need,” said Rob DiPietro, GVP of Product Services for AutoVantage. “The survey prepares our members for the things that they may encounter when driving in a new city.”

The In the Driver’s Seat Road Rage Survey, commissioned by AutoVantage, the complete car and roadside assistance service, measured behavior, observations and attitudes related to “road rage” as reported in America’s 25 largest cities, and provides an update to previous research completed in 2009.

Other cities surveyed in 2014 include Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York City, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, Seattle and Tampa Bay.

Observations for each city can be found at www.autovantage.com/roadrage.html

__________________________________________________________

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines
#roadrage as when a driver “commits moving traffic offenses so as to endanger other persons or property; an assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger of one motor vehicle on the operator or passengers of another motor vehicle”.

The NHTSA makes a clear distinction between road rage and aggressive driving, where road rage is a criminal charge and aggressive driving is a traffic offense. This definition places the blame on the driver.

Road Rage Behavior Among Drivers In U.S. 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

Atlanta Anger Management offers help for:

  • Road Rage
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Stress Management
  • Anger Management
  • Rage Management
  • Assertive Communication Skill Enhancement
  • Learning Self Control Of Emotions
  • Safe Driving


CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/atlangerman/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/atlangerman
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/atlangerman/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/atlangerman/
Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/atlanta-anger-management-atlanta
About.Me www.about.me/richardtaylorAAM

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

CNN Special Report On #Being13

http://www.cnn.com/specials/us/being13

Watch a CNN Special Report, “#Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens,” Monday at 9 p.m. ET on CNN. Warning: This story contains explicit language.

Anderson Cooper and team did a great job on #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens. Social Media addiction applies to adults as well. Worth viewing the re-play on Cable or On Demand services. – Richard Taylor

(CNN)”I would rather not eat for a week than get my phone taken away. It’s really bad,” said Gia, a13-year-old. “I literally feel like I’m going to die.”

“When I get my phone taken away, I feel kind of naked,” said Kyla, another 13-year-old. “I do feel kind of empty without my phone.”

Both participated in “#Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens,” a first-of-its-kind CNN study on social media and teens.

More than 200 eighth graders from across the country allowed their social media feeds to be studied by child development experts who partnered with CNN. This is the first large scale study to analyze what kids actually say to each other on social media and why it matters so deeply to them.

“We see a lot of evidence of, if not out-right addiction to social media, a heavy dependence on it,” said sociologist Robert Faris, a school bullying and youth aggression researcher who co-authored the study. “There’s a lot of anxiety about what’s going on online, when they’re not actually online, so that leads to compulsive checking.”

Read the study: (Warning: Explicit language)

Why are teens so anxious about what’s happening online? #Being13 found that it’s largely due to a need to monitor their own popularity status, and defend themselves against those who challenge it.

61% of teens said they wanted to see if their online posts are getting likes and comments.
36% of teens said they wanted to see if their friends are doing things without them.
21% of teens said they wanted to make sure no one was saying mean things about them.

“This is an age group that has a lot of anxiety about how they fit in, what they rank, what their peer-status is. There is fear in putting yourself out there on social media and they hope for lots of likes and comments and affirmations but there is always the chance that someone could say something mean,” said child clinical psychologist Marion Underwood, the study’s other co-author.

The perils of lurking on social media

The study was conducted with eighth graders at eight different schools in six states across the country. Participating students, with the permission of their parents, registered their Instagram, Twitter and Facebook accounts through a secure server created by Smarsh, an electronic archiving company contracted by CNN. The study’s co-authors, along with their teams, analyzed an estimated 150,000 social media posts collected over a six month period. In addition, the teens also answered a number of survey questions about their use of social media.

‘If they’re talking about me, I’m going to talk about them’

The more teens look at social media, the study found, the more distressed they can become. The heaviest social media users admitted to checking their social media feeds more than 100 times a day, sometimes even during school hours. What’s more, some teens are so vigilant about those who might be casting them in a negative light, they follow the social media accounts of not only their friends, but also their enemies.

“I want to see what they’re talking about and if they’re talking about me. Because if they’re talking about me, I’m going to talk about them,” said Zack, one of this study’s teen subjects.

#Being13 also found that teens no longer see a distinction between their lives in the real world versus the online world. But they’ll still post online what they admit they’d never say in person.

“Go die. Stop trying to be popular. Holy s**t your (sic) ugly,” read one social media post sent to a girl in the study.

“On a serious level you are f**k bouta (sic) get your ass kicked,” read a post written by a boy in the study.

“Goddamn u dirty bitch u dirty bitch u dirty bitch,” read a post by another boy.

The level of profanity, explicit sexual language and references to drug use surprised the experts, considering the study’s subjects were only in eighth grade.

“I didn’t realize these kinds of behaviors trickled down. You see this at the high school level but these are kids, who I think of as children, and we saw a lot of adult content on these platforms,” Faris said.

Parents: Here’s how to stop the worst of social media

‘They’re sharing this stuff that was supposed to be kept private’

The adult content went far beyond the use of language. #Being13 found that even 13-year-olds are exposed to the sexualized side of the Internet. Fifteen percent of teens in this study reported receiving inappropriate photos, and those that did were nearly 50% more distressed than the rest of the students in this study.

“Receiving these pictures is upsetting, especially at such a young age, because it’s something you didn’t ask to see, it’s something you may have wished you did not open, but you can’t erase it out of your mind,” Underwood said. “It’s illegal, it’s worrisome, it’s scary, it’s dangerous, it’s loaded. If you tell an adult, everybody will get in a lot of trouble. So I think it puts them in a really tough position.”

In addition to receiving inappropriate photos, some teens in this study spoke about the prevalence of so-called revenge porn.

“What they like to call it is ‘exposing.’ It’s either, like, an ex-girlfriend or an ex-boyfriend, the majority of the time, and what they do is post … naked pictures of the person,” said Morgan, an eighth grade girl in this study. “They’re sharing this stuff that was supposed to be kept private between the two, and really shouldn’t have happened in the first place, but it did, and now they’re spreading it.”

Underwood explained that a break-up at age 13 can already be overwhelming, but to combine those feelings with this new, and malicious, form of payback can simply be devastating.

“To have the additional fear that incriminating pictures, that intimate pictures, are out there for others to see just adds to the shame and humiliation,” she said. “When they are hurt, when they are furious … unfortunately that’s just perfect ammunition.”

Parents ‘effectively erased the negative effects’

#Being13 also studied parents of the participating teens. Almost all parents — 94% — underestimated the amount of fighting happening over social media. Despite that finding, parents that tried to keep a close eye on their child’s social media accounts had a profound effect on their child’s psychological well-being.

“Parent monitoring effectively erased the negative effects of online conflicts,” Faris said.

Beyond discovering a number of posts and trends that parents might find alarming, #Being13 also found that social media can have plenty of benefits for 13-year-olds.

“It’s a way for them to connect with friends. It’s a way for them to see what people are doing. It’s a way for them to feel affirmed, supported, lifted up,” Underwood said. “Young people use social media to exercise positive leadership all the time.”

She cautioned though, “there is the occasional hurtful comment, the occasional painful period, experience of exclusion that looms large for most of them.”

Anderson Cooper on the new documentary

#Being13
anderson cooper reporters notebook being 13 ac_00023108

Anderson Cooper on the new documentary #Being13 02:32

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/05/health/being-13-teens-social-media-study/index.html

 

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
Atlanta, Georgia USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Good To Know – ATL Airport Dominates

Clients have flown into Atlanta, GA to work with Richard Taylor of Atlanta Anger Management for issues of emotional control, couples conflict management,  job performance enhancement, and sports anger management.

Cheap flights from Atlanta, GA¹
  • Atlanta, GA is the gateway for cheap flights to domestic and international destinations and it currently has non-stop flights to 235 cities.
  • Atlanta, GA travelers take frequent flights to the following cities of Las Vegas, Nevada, Honolulu, Hawaii and New York City, New York.
  • In 2014 London, United Kingdom was the favorite European destination for travelers flying from Atlanta, GA and was followed by other cities like Rome, Italy, Paris, France and Frankfurt, Germany.
  • San Juan, Puerto Rico and other favorite sunny locations like Montego Bay, Jamaica, St. Thomas are also places visited by Atlanta, GA travelers.
  • The Top Asia destinations like Mumbai (Bombay), India, Manila, Philippines and New Delhi, India are also some favorite places for Atlanta, GA travelers.

Hartsfield-Jackson has a direct economic impact of more than about $32.5 billion for the metro Atlanta area economy.²

Photo Gallery

2015 statistics³

Airports Council International‘s year-to-date figures as of March 2015 are as follows:[1]

Rank Airport Location Country Code
(IATA/ICAO)
Total
passengers
Rank
Change
%
Change
1. United StatesHartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport Atlanta, Georgia United States ATL/KATL 22,746,009 Steady Increase5.1%
2. ChinaBeijing Capital International Airport ChaoyangShunyi, Beijing China PEK/ZBAA 21,663,240 Steady Increase5.5%
3. United Arab EmiratesDubai International Airport Garhoud, Dubai United Arab Emirates DXB/OMDB 19,606,327 Increase3 Increase6.8%
4. JapanTokyo Haneda Airport Ōta, Tokyo Japan HND/RJTT 18,053,930 Steady Increase8.4%
5. United StatesLos Angeles International Airport Los Angeles, California United States LAX/KLAX 16,416,281 Steady Increase2.8%
6. United KingdomLondon Heathrow Airport Hillingdon, London United Kingdom LHR/EGLL 16,364,246 Decrease3 Increase2.0%
7. ChinaHong Kong International Airport Chek Lap Kok, Hong Kong China HKG/VHHH 16,328,000 Increase3 Increase9.0%
8. United StatesO’Hare International Airport Chicago, Illinois United States ORD/KORD 16,258,025 Decrease1 Increase9.8%
9. United StatesDallas/Fort Worth International Airport DallasFort Worth, Texas United States DFW/KDFW 14,487,751 Steady Decrease1.2%
10. ThailandSuvarnabhumi Airport Bang Phli, Samut Prakan Thailand BKK/VTBS 14,139,314 Increase12 Increase14.8%
11. ChinaShanghai Pudong International Airport Pudong, Shanghai China PVG/ZSPD 14,136,814 Increase8 Increase17.7%
12. FranceParis-Charles de Gaulle Airport Roissy-en-France, Île-de-France France CDG/LFPG 14,113,587 Decrease4 Increase2.2%
13. ChinaGuangzhou Baiyun International Airport BaiyunHuadu, Guangzhou, Guangdong China CAN/ZGGG 14,094,902 Increase2 Increase3.7%
14. SingaporeSingapore Changi Airport Changi Singapore SIN/WSSS 13,076,000 Increase2 Decrease0.9%
15. TurkeyIstanbul Atatürk Airport Istanbul Turkey IST/LTBA 12,944,832 Decrease2 Increase4.4%
16. South KoreaSeoul Incheon International Airport Incheon Republic of Korea ICN/RKSI 12,539,595 Increase7 Increase15.6%
17. GermanyFrankfurt Airport Frankfurt, Hesse Germany FRA/EDDF 12,508,282 Decrease6 Increase2.8%
18. IndonesiaSoekarno-Hatta International Airport Cengkareng, Banten Indonesia CGK/WIII 12,314,667 Decrease6 Decrease9.5%
19. United StatesDenver International Airport Denver, Colorado United States DEN/KDEN 12,213,404 Decrease1 Decrease1.4%
20. MalaysiaKuala Lumpur International Airport Sepang, Selangor Malaysia KUL/WMKK 11,972,635 Steady Decrease2.9%
21. United StatesJohn F. Kennedy International Airport Queens, New York City, New York United States JFK/KJFK 11,924,793 Decrease4 Increase7.4%
22. NetherlandsAmsterdam Airport Schiphol Haarlemmermeer, North Holland The Netherlands AMS/EHAM 11,530,950 Decrease8 Increase3.5%
23. United StatesPhoenix Sky Harbor International Airport Phoenix, Arizona United States PHX/KPHX 11,015,495 Increase3 Increase4.5%
24. United StatesMiami International Airport Miami-Dade County, Florida United States MIA/KMIA 10,978,401 Increase5 Increase4.6%
25. United StatesSan Francisco International Airport San Mateo County, California United States SFO/KSFO 10,799,749 Decrease4 Increase5.1%
26. IndiaIndira Gandhi International Airport Delhi India DEL/VIDP 10,686,816 Increase5 Increase13.0%
27. United StatesCharlotte Douglas International Airport Charlotte, North Carolina United States CLT/KCLT 10,344,920 Decrease3 Increase0.1%
28. United StatesMcCarran International Airport Las Vegas, Nevada United States LAS/KLAS 10,307,039 Decrease3 Increase1.7%
29. ChinaChengdu Shuangliu International Airport Shuangliu, Chengdu, Sichuan China CTU/ZUUU 10,184,839 Increase9 Increase13.3%
30. BrazilSão Paulo-Guarulhos International Airport Guarulhos, São Paulo Brazil GRU/SBGR 9,961,379 Steady Increase1.9%

Hotels

ATLANTA’S HARTSFIELD JACKSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

  • Since 1998, Hartsfield-Jackson has been the busiest passenger airport in the world.
  • Atlanta has the tallest air traffic control tower in North America (398 feet or 121 meters) and is the third tallest in the world.
  • Atlanta is within a two hour flight of 80% of the United States population.
  • Hartsfield-Jackson averages almost 250,000 passengers a day.
  • On average, there are over 1,300 daily domestic departures.
  • There are over 150 U.S. destinations with non-stop service from Atlanta.
  • The airport offers direct flights to 95 cities in 57 countries.
  • On average there are over 2,700 arrivals and departures daily, making Hartsfield-Jackson the busiest airport in the world for total movements.
  • Hartsfield-Jackson has 143,000 domestic seats available daily and 132,000 international seats available weekly.
  • The average price of a one-way domestic airline ticket is $172.

Mainline Airlines

Air Canada Continental Airlines Midwest Airlines
Air Canada Jazz Delta Airlines Northwest Airlines
Air France Frontier Airlines Spirit Airlines
AirTran Airways KLM Royal Dutch Airlines United Airlines
American Airlines Korean Air US Airways
Lufthansa German Airlines


Regional Airlines

American Connection / Chautauqua Airlines Delta Connection / SkyWest Airlines
American Connection / American Eagle United Express / Shuttle America
Delta Connection / Atlantic Southeast Airlines US Airways Express / Air Wisconsin
Delta Connection / Comair US Airway Express / Mesa Airlines
Delta Connection / Pinnacle Airlines US Airway Express / PSA
Delta Connection / Shuttle America US Airways Express / Republic Airlines


Charter Airlines

Omni Air Intternational Ryan International World Airways

 

HOME | WHO HAS ANGER | ANGER IS AN EMOTION | WHAT IS ANGER MANAGEMENT |
ANGER MANAGEMENT SCHEDULE
| COURT ORDERED | RAGE MANAGEMENT | COUPLES CONFLICT MANAGEMENT | ANGER ONE DAY COURSE | ANGER ASSESSMENT EVALUATIONS | ANGER EXECTUTIVE COACHING |TEEN ADOLESCENT ANGER MANAGEMENT | STRESS MANAGEMENT |WORKSHOPS | ANGER MANAGEMENT SEMINARS | STRESS SEMINARS | SPEAKER ENGAGEMENTS | ABOUT | BOOKS | LINKS | CONTACT | SITEMAP

Source: http://atlantaangermanagement.com/ATL.htm

____________________________________________________________

¹ http://www.tripadvisor.com/Flights-o60898-From_Atlanta-Cheap_Discount_Airfares.html

² http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/ATL_FactSheet.aspx

³ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_world’s_busiest_airports_by_passenger_traffic#2015_statistics

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
Atlanta, Georgia USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

First Step:
Emotional Intelligence Assessments
For HR Managers and Businesses

BUSINESS RELATED ANGER MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENTS
HR DEPARTMENT ANGER MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENTS
EAP ANGER MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENTS
ATTORNEY REFERRED ANGER MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENTS

BUSINESS RELATED EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENTS
HR DEPARTMENT EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENTS
EAP EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENTS
ATTORNEY REFERRED EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENTS

Atlanta Anger Management a Certified Anderson & Anderson™ Provider offers Emotional Intelligence/Anger Management Assessments for HR Departments and Corporations looking to determine whether or not there is a need for anger management / civility / emotional intelligence intervention for staff members and employees.

Now Businesses can evaluate whether employees have anger – emotional control issues.

Potential Anger Management clients, as well as Corporations and HR Departments, can now benefit from the use of this individualized Organizational Anger Management Assessment.

 The Corporate / Business Assessment Program uses a Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 Assessment to determine his/her level of functioning in five distinct areas outlined below.

The assessment is essential to the success of intervention. After completing our Corporate / Business Program a Post-Anger Management Assessment is given to produce Evidence Based improvement/results.

Organizational Training Seminars can be designed for your corporations looking to educate large staff groups.

World Wide Inquires Welcome. Atlanta’s Hartsfield Jackson International Airport allows us to fly anywhere in the world on short notice at better prices since it is the busiest passenger airport in the world. Richard is an experienced traveler with passport ready.

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT  – Your #1 Choice For Help With Anger ~ Rage ~ Conflict Management And Emotional Intelligence Development.

For more information contact Director Richard Taylor at 678-576-1913 or by visiting the Atlanta Anger Management site.

Richard Taylor BS, CAMF conducts Assessments for Businesses, HR Referrals, EAP Departments, Government Referrals, Attorneys, and Executives, Self Evaluation Volunteers.

Richard Taylor is MHS EQ-i 2.0 and EQ 360 Certified Provider.

You simply call Richard Taylor at 678-576-1913 with:

  • Your Full Legal Name
  • Address
  • City, State, Zip Code
  • Phone
  • E-mail Address
  • Visa/MC/AMEX information – Cost $150.00
  • You will be e-mailed and invited to enter the Bar on EQ-i 2.0 website 24/7 and complete the 133 question assessment that will take about 13-25 minutes.
  • Once the Assessment is scored, you will receive your assessment results via email.
  • You will be impressed and excited learning new valuable insights and information provided by this assessment about your strengths and weaknesses.
  • Clients feedback has been extremely positive saying it is “worth the money.”

The EQ-i 2.0 Assessment is used to determine if you might need Anger Management / Emotional Intelligence Training and Education.

COST: $150.00

YOU RECEIVE: Detailed Report of Results.

EXAMPLE REPORT

Follow Up Debriefing $450.00 for three hours.

Coaching $150/Hour. In person, phone or skype.

Call Richard at 678-576-1913 or e-mail to set up convenient appointment time. No Drop Ins.

 

We accept VISA – MC- AMEX – CASH PayPal. No Checks.

The Bar On EQ-i2.0 Assessment Instrument measures
the client’s level of functioning in the areas of:

  • Self Regard
  • Self Actualization
  • Emotional Self Awareness
  • Emotional Expression
  • Assertiveness
  • Independence
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Empathy
  • Social Responsibility
  • Problem Solving
  • Reality Testing
  • Impulse Control
  • Flexibility
  • Stress Tolerance
  • Optimism

 

 

Results will dictate whether further enhancement is warranted. Individual Coaching Sessions are best for specific work addressed to those areas of weakness, but also strengths.

After this coaching and the individual application and practice of these principles it is strongly suggested a Post Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 Assessment is taken to produce a new report usually showing much improvement if those areas worked on. In effect Evidence Based Assessment. If courts are involved or other legal actions may be involvements this is well worth the investment. Cost $150.00 with Report.

With a signed Release Of Information by the Individual: Courts, Probation Officers, CPS, Companies, Corporations, Government Agencies, Law Enforcement Officers, and Fire Fighters, Employers and Other Agencies receive a Letter Of Treatment report for all individuals who have been ordered to take an Assessment.

______________________________________________________________

As Anderson and Anderson™ Model Of Anger Management evolves so we in turn at Atlanta Anger Management do also as one of the premier Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Providers Nationally and in the US Southeast.

Over the last four years, Anderson & Anderson™ has moved closer to linking its anger management curricula to the Bar On EQ-i2.0 Emotional Intelligence Assessment and the concepts of EI as articulated in The EQ Edge relative to the 15 scales that form the core of this instrument.

Anderson & Anderson™ will continue to influence and lead how Anger Management is practiced throughout the United States. Anger Management has moved from the management of anger to a broader understanding of the relationship between anger, stress, communication, self-awareness, social awareness, impulse control, optimism, decision making, self-perception, flexibility or relationship management.

Anderson & Anderson™ was one of the first major Anger Management Providers to push for a clear acknowledgement from the American Psychiatric Association that while anger may be a symptom of a range of health and mental health disorders, anger is not in itself a pathological condition and is not a listed illness in The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) DSM-IV-TR.

According to the American Psychiatric Association, anger is a normal human emotion that is experienced by everyone at some time.
This is important since it means that counseling, psychotherapy or psychotropic medication is not the intervention of choice for anger management. It allows anger to be defined as a problem when it is too intense, occurs too frequently, impacts health, lasts too long, destroys interpersonal relationships or leads to person-directed aggression.

All of the commonly recognized emotional intelligence concepts offer the best over all strategies for skill enhancement in impulse control. Coaching has increased the usefulness of Emotional Intelligence and made anger management far more acceptable to those seeking help.

WELL-BEING INDICATOR

Happiness

The EQ-i 2.0 has been modified to view happiness as a product of emotional intelligence rather than a contributing factor to emotional intelligence. It explores the relationship between one’s level of Happiness and Self-Regard, Optimism, Interpersonal Relationships, and Self-Actualization. Each report will consist of a Happiness score which is generated in the same manner as all other EQ-i 2.0 subscales, but it does not affect the total EI score.

Below is The Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Model For Emotional Intelligence Assessments that is available.

Atlanta Anger Management / Richard Taylor helps you understandd it’s meaning for better skill development in areas of weakness and strengthening even more those areas you excel at. Balance is often the key. Goal Setting is part of the Coaching process.

This Bar On EQ-i2.0  Assessment of individuals (and small groups) can be completed on-line, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. This is an excellent tool for use by HR Managers from any type of organization, EAP Managers, Organizational Development Professionals,  Attorney At Law that have clients needing an Assessment before proceeding in court.

This Bar On EQ-i2.0 is one of the latest, most effective instrument for assessing Emotional Intelligence competencies.

New Reseach
Research Digest

This section of the EI Consortium web site is intended to keep you updated with the latest research findings. We will be summarizing the latest research in the area of emotional intelligence in the workplace by providing you with abstracts of the latest articles from the literature. Each month we will be highlighting a different area from the scholarly literature on emotional intelligence. If you want research updates sent to you automatically, just sign up for our monthly newsletter.

Cherniss, C., Grimm, L.G., & Liautaud, J.P. (2010). Process-designed training: A new approach for helping leaders develop emotional and social competence. Journal of Management Development, 29(5), 413-431.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an EI leadership development program. The study was unique in utilizing a random assignment control group design.

Participants were 162 managers from nine different companies. There were nine different groups with nine managers in each group. Each group was required to follow the identical process.

Trained moderators led the groups during year 1, but during year 2 a group member served as moderator.

The outcome measure was the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI)(Bar On EQ Inventory 2.0), a multi-rater measure of social and emotional competencies. Outcome data were collected before the program started, one year later, and two years later.

Results indicated that after two years the intervention group had improved more than the controls on all ECI variables. The study offers recommendations for future research on the
mechanisms underlying the process-designed group strategy and contextual factors that optimize results.

The main implication of the study is that leadership development based on a process-designed group strategy appears to be more economical and consistent in its delivery than more traditional approaches such as workshops or executive coaching.

Source: http://www.eiconsortium.org/

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF,
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Certified MHS Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Provider (Special Training)
Diplomate of the AAAMP

Atlanta Anger Management

5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam