5 Breathing Techniques For Weight Loss

Five Breathing Techniques For Weight Loss
(Anger Management & Stress Management)

Conscious Breathing
By Elizabeth Biscevic
eHow Contributor

When it comes to losing weight and boosting our metabolism, we tend to focus on fad diets and supplements rather than thinking about our breath. Surprisingly, the breath plays a major role in fat loss and metabolism.

Taking 15 minutes a day to just breathe a little deeper could help aid in weight loss.

Fat is made up of oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen. When oxygen makes its way to the fat molecules, it breaks them down into carbon dioxide and water. The blood filters out the carbon dioxide and gives it to the lungs to be exhaled.

Oxygen also thins the blood, which lowers your blood pressure and speeds up metabolism. That’s a pretty cool perk for something the body does on its own.

Add some conscious breathing to your daily routine with one of these five methods.

Method 1: Deep Breathing For Relaxation
1. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
2. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts.
3. Hold at the top of your inhale for six counts.
4. Exhale slowly for six counts.
5. Check your posture. Are you slouching with your exhale? If you’re slouching, readjust your position to ensure a straight spine and repeat steps 2 through 5.

Do this 10 times each evening or when you start to feel stressed or overwhelmed. You can do the exercise sitting up straight on hard chair or standing.

Method 2: Deep Breathing For Energy
1. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
2. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts. When you feel like your lungs are completely filled, take one more sip of air.
3. Hold your breath for eight counts. Work toward eventually holding it for 12 counts.
4. Exhale through the mouth for eight counts. Do not release all the air at once. Try pursing your lips to release air more slowly. When you feel like you have no more air in your lungs, exhale one breath more.
5. Hold your breath again for 8 counts, keeping your ribcage and abdomen tight and contracted. If you can’t hold your breath for eight counts without feeling overwhelmed, hold your breath for less time and try to work toward eight counts.

Repeat these steps 10 times in the morning and anytime during the day for a burst of energy. You can do this exercise sitting or standing.

Method 3: Alternate Nostril Breathing for Cleansing
1. Sit up straight and place your left hand comfortably on your left knee.
2. Place the tip of your right index finger and middle finger on the space between your eyebrows. Place your right thumb on your right nostril. Position your right ring finger near your left nostril.
3. Press your thumb down on your right nostril and exhale through the left nostril until there’s no more air in your lungs. Breathe in deeply through your left nostril.
4. Release the pressure on your right nostril, press down with your ring finger on your left nostril, and exhale through your right nostril until there’s no more air in your lungs.
5. Release the pressure on your left nostril, and breathe in through your right nostril.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5. In other words, alternate nostrils in/out.

Remain in a comfortable seat position and repeat this sequence five to seven times.

Method 4: The Breath of Fire For Metabolism
1. Sit up very straight and place your fists on your core center. This will encourage you to keep your core contracted.
2. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
3. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts.
4. Purse your lips and make short, powerful exhalations. Do not inhale in between exhalations. The force of the exhalations will naturally bring air back into your lungs. Exhale 50 to 100 times, gradually increasing the number of exhales.
5. On the last exhale, force all of the air from your lungs and hold for one count.
6. Relax and breathe normally.

Do this sitting on your knees or in a comfortable seated very straight position.

Method 5: Vacuum Breathing For Toning the Core
1. Place your knees and hands on the ground. Animal Style.
2. Exhale all the air from your lungs while sucking your belly in.
3. Hold your breath and expand your lungs without an inhaling. Try to pull your stomach to your spine.
4. Hold this position for 10 seconds.
5. Release your breath slowly and repeat.

Do this for five minutes each day.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_5481782_deep-breathing-weight-loss.html

Above is the best how to I’ve seen. Nice. Do it. Try different ones to alleviate boredom.

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA
Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence
Unique Approach to High Couples Conflict Management – Coaching – Narrative – Mentoring

Anxious – Book – 4 Coping Strategies

TaiLopez.com Book Of The Day

Anxious: Using the Brain to Understand and Treat Fear and Anxiety
by Joseph LeDoux
Link: http://amzn.com/0670015334   Amazon

If you are expecting a quick and easy read, this is not the book for you. On the other hand, if you are an educator or interested in learning historical psychological concepts and treatment of mental health disorders and treatment, you may find the premises in this textbook both interesting and refreshing.1

1. Just take a deep breath: “This folk wisdom has a grain of truth to it. During stress the sympathetic nervous system dominates, overshadowing the parasympathetic system. But when one breathes slowly and deeply, “The vagus nerve, becomes more active and the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system improves.”

2. Focus less on self by meditating: “Our conscious self will do almost anything to maintain the independence, power, control, or success that it has achieved, even if to do so other people, other cultures, or the world has to suffer. A healthier approach is to let go of the ‘absolute self’ that we construct and recognize our broader role in life.”

3.  Combine self-exposure with proactive avoidance: If you have fear of crowds, “Rather than forcing oneself to ride out anxiety at a dinner party, use anxiety control strategies, such as relaxation and active coping (like trips to the bathroom or stepping out to make a call) that enable regrouping before reexposure.”

4.  Hang out with resilient, non-anxious people: “Resilient individuals tend to have a large repertoire of active coping options.  We’re able to use observation and instruction to explicitly learn to avoid. We create avoidance concepts or schemas, and when in danger we draw upon these stored action plans.”

If you are naturally a worrier you can change: “Although some people are by their nature’s more anxious than others, ever increasing anxiety doesn’t have to be their destiny. Just as the brain can learn to be anxious, it can also learn to not be that way.”
Stay Strong
Tai

Amazon – Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What’s this? )

Some reviewers say that the book is too academic for them, but the description on the cover clearly states that this “explains the science behind fear and anxiety disorders.” Maybe these reviewers were expecting another soft new age psychology book. Rather, this is a refreshing different perspective from real neuroscience breakthroughs in understanding this problem. The examples from the book below show that the language is easy to understand for any level audience, ranging from high school to university research professor.

The first half of this book is a wonderfully exciting journey through the mechanisms of the brain, explaining how the biology of fear and anxiety works, in a way that is easy for anyone to understand. The book ventures into cutting edge research, so even someone with a neuroscience or medical background would benefit from this as a knowledge refresher. The second half of the book describes pros and cons of the traditional therapy approaches, and the author’s recommendations for improved strategies based on the latest research advances in understanding the contribution of the conscious mind and higher levels of thinking to anxiety problems. On page 252:

“Putting Conscious Experience Front and Center in the Science of Anxiety
As I have argued, the essence of anxiety is the unpleasant feeling — the apprehension, dread, angst, and worry — that one experiences when he perceives he lacks control in situations of uncertainty and risk. It is a by-product of our unique ability to envision our future self and especially to anticipate unpleasant, or even catastrophic, scenarios regardless of their likelihood..”

The book explores a variety of techniques, including learning to control anxiety through meditation.Read more ›

Comment

Thank you for your feedback.

Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What’s this? )

While Joseph LeDoux states in the preface that he negotiated his way out of the textbook format to work with Viking editor, Rick Kot and write “Anxious: Using the Brain to Understand and Treat Fear and Anxiety” this is clearly a college level psychology textbook. It is a researched based study of the science behind fear and anxiety disorders.

Following the preface are 317 pages broken down into 11 chapters with ample figures and tables. Pages 310 through 360 are chapter notes while pages 361 through 451 compose a detailed bibliography.

I was surprised by the format of this book; however, as an avid reader of both self-help and textbooks dealing with psychology and mental health issues and treatment, I found this an interesting and easy to follow review of historical psychological concepts that I have learned in the past, as well as concepts that are new to me in in the study of the biological and cognitive human brain and environmental factors impacting human feelings, behavior and mental health, as well as medical treatment and therapy.

One example is the author’s statement that “anxiety” (meaning feelings fear or apprehension about what might happen in the future) is the price humans pay for autonoetic consciousness. I learned that the concept of autonoetic consciousness centers on self-awareness, self-analysis and our ability to think about our past and present thoughts, emotions and experiences and relate them to present and future events. While that gift enables us avoid danger and learn from our experiences, sometimes it causes undo fear and anxiety.

If you are expecting a quick and easy read, this is not the book for you. On the other hand, if you are an educator or interested in learning historical psychological concepts and treatment of mental health disorders and treatment, you may find the premises in this textbook both interesting and refreshing.

Enjoy!

Compliments:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Coffee And Anger: Any Cause/Effect?

Coffee And Anger: Any Cause/Effect?

Can Too Much Caffeine Cause Anger & Confusion?

Last Updated: Jun 23, 2015 | By Lynne Sheldon.

Caffeine has its benefits: It reduces fatigue, stimulates your nervous system and helps you stay alert. However, consuming it in excess has drawbacks; if you drink too much caffeine, you may experience side effects like irritability, nervousness and even anger and confusion. Talk to your doctor about reducing your caffeine intake, and cut back if your consumption is causing you more harm than good.

Side Effects of Caffeine

Your body absorbs and distributes caffeine rapidly after you consume it, and it does not continually circulate in your bloodstream but is excreted through your urine, explains the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Caffeine provides temporary relief from drowsiness, but it also has some negative side effects. These include feelings of anxiety and restlessness, as well as irritability and anger. If these feelings get in the way of your ability to function and pay attention, you may then experience confusion as well. Too much caffeine can also cause a rapid heart rate, digestive upset and muscle tremors.

How Much Is Too Much?

A moderate dose of caffeine is defined as 200 to 300 milligrams a day, and this translates to 2 to 3 cups of coffee, according to MedlinePlus.com. For most people, this amount is unlikely to cause harm. Heavy consumption is defined as more than 500 to 600 milligrams a day, and it is this amount of intake that is most likely to cause anger, confusion and other adverse symptoms. But some people are more sensitive to caffeine and its effects than others. So even if your consumption is within the moderate range, you should still consider cutting back if you are experiencing negative effects.

Caffeine Content and Ways to Reduce

Caffeine may be in more items than you think — coffee, caffeinated tea, chocolate, cocoa and some sodas all contain caffeine. Certain pain relievers, cold medicines and appetite suppressants may also contain caffeine. If you need to cut back on your caffeine intake, do this over the course of several days or weeks. For example, try lessening your intake of coffee by 1 cup each day, or less if you find you are experiencing withdrawal symptoms. Reducing your intake too quickly can cause negative effects as well, which may make you feel even angrier and more confused than when you consumed caffeine.

Additional Considerations

Keep in mind that certain medications, such as antibiotics, as well as herbal supplements like echinacea can increase caffeine’s concentration in your blood, resulting in heightened negative side effects like anger and confusion. Never stop taking your medications or otherwise altering your diet without first discussing these changes with your health-care provider. People with coronary heart disease or peptic ulcers may have to limit or eliminate their caffeine intake to avoid potential health complications, according to Drugs.com.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/488967-can-too-much-caffeine-cause-anger-confusion/

 

Why Coffee Causes Irritability and Anxiety

Last Updated: Jan 08, 2014 | By Dr. Heidi Moawad.

For many, coffee is an eye opener, a pleasant break or a way to make a social connection. However, anxiety and irritability sometimes occur in conjunction with drinking coffee. People who are not regular coffee drinkers are more prone to these side effects, according to an August 2010 study report published in “Neuropsychopharmacology.” A number of research studies have examined this relationship. Coffee contains many chemicals, but caffeine is the one responsible for causing anxiety and irritability.

Caffeine and Irritability

Irritability is an unpleasant feeling of being overly sensitive to stimulation and easily annoyed. The caffeine found in coffee can produce a heightened sense of perception by stimulating the brain. This effect makes a person more aware of mild annoyances, thereby increasing irritability. Caffeine withdrawal in someone used to consuming large amounts of coffee or other caffeinated beverages can also cause irritability.

Caffeine and Anxiety

Anxiety is a sense of apprehension and unease. The same chemical process in the brain that causes the benefits of intensified alertness can actually serve as a double-edged sword, increasing anxiety by making you more aware of all the potential negative outcomes in a situation.

Variable Responses

The impact of coffee on anxiety and irritability is individualized. The chemicals in coffee trigger a range of emotional responses, depending on a person’s coffee drinking habits, body weight, metabolism and baseline mood. People who have had less exposure to caffeine or who regularly experience more than usual anxiety and irritability — even in the absence of coffee — tend to have a stronger response to the effects of coffee. There is also a genetic component to an individual’s response to coffee intake.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/368997-why-coffee-causes-irritability-anxiety/

 

Suggestion: If you think too much coffee is increasing the anger response, why not try cutting back on coffee consumption and see what happens? Do it slowly, one cup a day less…

Leave feedback on your journey….

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

 

Your Brain on Stress and Anxiety

Stress is the way our bodies and minds react to something which upsets our normal balance in life. Stress is how we feel and how our bodies react when we are fearful or anxious. Some level of stress has some upside to mind and body function to enable us to react in a positive way. Too much stress though, is both harmful to the body and our performance. How much is too much? Well, that depends… on you and how you respond.

It is essential to know how our brain responds to the stimuli which trigger an anxiety response so that you are equipped to deal appropriately with anxiety.

(Learn four simple brain hacks to overcome performance anxiety: https://youtu.be/FlgGLs1Cpcw)

Let me highlight the key areas of your brain that are involved, and then I will explain what happens inside the brain.

The Thalamus is the central hub for sights and sounds. The thalamus breaks down incoming visual cues by size, shape and colour, and auditory cues by volume and dissonance, and then signals the cortex.

The Cortex then gives raw sights and sounds meaning enabling you to be conscious of what you are seeing and hearing. And I’ll mention here that the prefrontal cortex is vital to turning off the anxiety response once the threat has passed.

The Amygdala is the emotional core of the brain whose primary role is to trigger the fear response. Information passing through the amygdala is associated with an emotional significance.

The bed nucleus of the stria terminals is particularly interesting when we discuss anxiety. While the amygdala sets off an immediate burst of fear whilst the BNST perpetuates the fear response, causing longer term unease typical of anxiety.

The Locus Ceruleus receives signals from the amygdala and initiates the classic anxiety response: rapid heartbeat, increased blood pressure, sweating and pupil dilation.

The Hippocampus is your memory centre storing raw information from the senses, along with emotional baggage attached to the data by the amygdala.

Now we know these key parts, what happens when we are anxious, stressed or fearful?

Anxiety, stress and, of course, fear are triggered primarily through your senses:

Sight and sound are first processed by the thalamus, filtering incoming cues and sent directly to the amygdala or the cortex.

Smells and touch go directly to the amygdala, bypassing the thalamus altogether. (This is why smells often evoke powerful memories or feelings).

Any cues from your incoming senses that are associated with a threat in the amygdala (real or not, current or not) are immediately processed to trigger the fear response. This is the expressway. It happens before you consciously feel the fear.

The Hippothalmus and Pituitary Gland cause the adrenal glands to pump out high levels of the stress hormone coritsol. Too much short circuits the cells of the hippocampus making it difficult to organize the memory of a trauma or stressful experience. Memories lose context and become fragmented.

The body’s sympathetic nervous system shifts into overdrive causing the heart to beat faster, blood pressure to rise and the lungs hyperventilate. Perspiration increases and the skin’s nerve endings tingle, causing goosebumps.

Your senses become hyper-alert, freezing you momentarily as you drink in every detail. Adrenaline floods to the muscles preparing you to fight or run away.

The brain shifts focus away from digestion to focus on potential dangers. Sometimes causing evacuation of the digestive tract thorough urination, defecation or vomiting. Heck, if you are about to be eaten as someone else’s dinner why bother digesting your own?

Only after the fear response has been activated does the conscious mind kick in. Some sensory information, takes a more thoughtful route from the thalamus to the cortex. The cortex decides whether the sensory information warrants a fear response. If the fear is a genuine threat in space and time, the cortex signals the amygdala to continue being on alert.

Fear is a good, useful response essential to survival. However, anxiety is a fear of something that cannot be located in space and time.

Most often it is that indefinable something triggered initially by something real that you sense, that in itself is not threatening but it is associated with a fearful memory. And the bed nucleus of the stria terminals perpetuate the fear response. Anxiety is a real fear response for the individual feeling anxious. Anxiety can be debilitating for the sufferer.

Now that you know how anxiety happens in your brain, we can pay attention to how we can deliberately use our pre-frontal cortex to turn off an inappropriate anxiety response once a threat has passed.

Background Nusic: My Elegant Redemption by Tim McMorris. http://audiojungle.net/item/my-elegan…

FInd out how we can help, http://www.gapps5.com

CONTACT

IN ATLANTA FOR ANGER, RAGE, STRESS, ANXIETY, EMOTION CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT.

Richard TaylorDirector Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence