HOW TO BE KIND

How to Be Kind

Three Parts:Developing a Kinder Perspective Developing Kind Qualities Taking Action Community  Q&A

Being kind is a vital way of bringing meaning to our own lives as well as the lives of others. Being kind allows us to communicate better, be more compassionate, and also to be a positive force in people’s lives. Kindness has its true source deep within you, and while some people are innately kind, it’s something that everyone can cultivate by choice.

Part 1

Developing a Kinder Perspective

  1. Care for others genuinely. At its most basic, kindness is about caring genuinely for others around you, wanting the best for them, and recognizing in them the same wants, needs, aspirations, and even fears that you have too. Kindness is warm, resilient, patient, trusting, loyal, and grateful.[1] Piero Ferrucci sees kindness as being about “making less effort” because it frees us from getting knotted up in negative attitudes and feelings such as resentment, jealousy, suspicion, and manipulation.[2] Ultimately, kindness is deep caring for all beings.
    • Practice kindness and generosity toward others. Being out of practice, being shy, or not knowing how to reach out to others can only be overcome in the doing, by continually trying until it becomes a natural impulse to be kind and giving to others.
    • Ask for nothing in return. The greatest kindness expects nothing, comes with no strings attached, and places no conditions on anything done or said.

 

  1. Don’t be kind for the sake of getting what you want. Beware of deluded kindness. Kindness is not about “self-interested politeness, calculated generosity, superficial etiquette”.[3] Simply being nice to other people because you believe that this will manipulate them into giving you what you want in life, or as a means of controlling them, is not kindness. Nor is kindness about pretending to care for someone all the while repressing anger or contempt; hiding our rage or frustration behind false pleasantries is not kindness.
    • Finally, being a people pleaser is not kindness; that’s simply behavior designed to give in and not rock the boat because you’re afraid that taking a step forward will sink the ship.

 

  1. Be kind to yourself. Many people make the error of trying to be kind to others while at the same time not focusing on being kind to themselves. Some of this can stem from not liking aspects of yourself, but more often than not, it’s sourced in the inability to know yourself better. And unfortunately, when you don’t feel rock solid within yourself, your kindness to others risks falling into the deluded types of kindness described in the previous step. Or, it can lead to burn-out and disillusionment because you’ve put everyone else first.
    • Self-knowledge allows you to see what causes you pain and conflict, and enables you to embrace your contradictions and inconsistencies. It allows the space to work on things about yourself that you’re not happy with. In turn, self-knowledge helps to prevent you from projecting your negative aspects onto other people, thereby empowering you to treat other people with love and kindness.[4].
    • Take time to become more self-aware and use this learning to be kinder to both yourself (remembering that we all have weaknesses) and to others. In this way, your inner angst is being dealt with rather than fueling your need to project the hurt and pain.
    • Avoid viewing time taken to become more aware of your own needs and limits as an act of selfishness; far from it, it is a vital pre-condition to being able to reach out to other people with great strength and awareness.
    • Ask yourself what you think it means to be kinder to yourself. For many people, being kinder to themselves includes monitoring the chatter in your thoughts and stopping your negative thinking.

 

  1. Learn kindness from others. Think about the truly kind people in your life and how they make you feel. Do you carry their warm glow around in your heart every time you think of them? It is likely that you do because kindness lingers, warming you even when the hardest challenges face you. When other people find a way to love you for who you are, it’s impossible to forget such trust and confirmation of worthiness, and their kindness lives on forever.
    • Remember how other people’s kindness “makes your day”. What is it about their kindness that makes you feel special and cherished? Are there things that they do that you can replicate from your own heart?

 

  1. Cultivate kindness for the good of your own health. Improved psychological health and happiness comes from thinking more positively, and kindness is a positive mental state. While kindness is about giving and being open to others, giving kindness returns a sense of well-being and connection to us that improves our own mental state and health.
    • Although simple, the very ability to be kind is in itself a powerful and consistent reward, a self-esteem booster.[5]

 

  1. Make a habit of focusing on kindness. Leo Babauta says that kindness is a habit and is one that everyone can cultivate. He suggests focusing on kindness every day for a month. At the end of this directed focus, you’ll be aware of profound changes in your life, you’ll feel better about yourself as a person, and you’ll find that people react to you differently, including treating you better. As he says, in the long run, being kind is karma in practice.[6] Suggestions to help cultivate your kindness include:
    • Do one kind thing for someone every day. Make a conscious decision at the beginning of the day what that kind act will be and make time to do it during the day.
    • Be kind, friendly, and compassionate when you interact with someone, and even more so where that person normally makes you angry, stressed, or bothered. Use kindness as your strength.
    • Build up your small acts of kindness into larger acts of compassion. Volunteering for those in need and taking the initiative to relieve suffering are bigger acts of compassion.[7]
    • Meditate to help spread kindness. Read Practice Loving Kindness Meditation (Metta) for more details.

 

  1. Be kind to everyone, not just people “in need”. Expand your circle of kindness. It can be very easy to be kind when we’re unconsciously doing what Stephanie Dowrick terms “patronizing kindness”.[8] This refers to kindness given to those people we feel are truly in need (the sick, the poor, the vulnerable, and those who align with our own ideals). Being kind to people close to us, emotionally (like family or friends) or in other ways (from the same country, of the same color, gender etc.), is also easier than being kind to those the philosopher Hegel called “the other”. It can be more difficult to be kind to people we may consider our equals, but it will be worth it.
    • The trouble with restricting our kindness to “convenient” cases is that we fail to recognize that we need to be kind to everyone, no matter who they are, their level of wealth or fortune, their values and beliefs, their behavior and attitudes, their place of origin, their likeness to ourselves, etc.
    • By choosing to be kind only to those we feel are deserving of kindness, we are unleashing our own biases and judgment, and only practicing conditional kindness. Natural kindness encompasses all beings and while the challenges you’ll face when trying to put this broader notion of kindness into practice will sometimes be trying, you’ll never stop learning about the depths of your ability to be truly kind.
    • If you’re neglecting being kind to someone else just because you think they can cope without your support or understanding, then you’re practicing selective kindness.

 

  1. Minimize judgment. If you really want to be kind, then you have to kick your judgment to the curb. Instead of spending your time being critical of other people, work on being positive and compassionate. If you tend to think poorly of others, wish other people could step up their game, or feel like the people around you are needy or clueless, then you’ll never learn true kindness. Stop judging people and realize that you’ll never fully understand where they’re coming from unless you walk a day in their shoes. Focus on wanting to help others instead of judging them for not being better than they are.
    • If you’re judgmental, prone to gossip, or just always bad-mouthing the people around you, you’ll never be able to move past your reservations to be kind.
    • Being kind means giving people the benefit of the doubt instead of expecting perfection.

Be Kind

Part 2

Developing Kind Qualities

  1. Be compassionate toward others. It’s important to take in the message, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle”. Attributed to Plato, this saying is a recognition that everyone is undergoing some challenge or other in their lives and that sometimes, it’s all too easy for us to lose sight of that when embroiled in our own problems or anger against them. Before committing an action that might impact another person negatively, ask yourself a simple question: “Is this kind?”. If you cannot answer this in the affirmative, this is a reminder to change your action and approach immediately.
    • Even where you’re feeling at your very worst, remember that other people are also feeling uncertainty, pain, hardship, sadness, disappointment, and loss. In no way does this belittle your own feelings but it does allow you to realize that people often react from their hurt and pain rather than from their whole self, and kindness is the key to seeing past the raging emotions and connecting with the real person inside.

 

  1. Don’t expect perfection. If you have a tendency toward perfectionism, competitiveness, or a driven sense of urgency, self-kindness can often be a victim of your ambition and fast pace, as well as your fear of being seen to be lazy or selfish.[9] Remember to slow down and to forgive yourself when things don’t work out as wished.
    • Learn from your mistakes rather than beating yourself up over them, or comparing yourself to others.[10] It is through self-compassionate responses that you can start to see other people’s needs in a compassionate light.
  2. Be present. The greatest gift of kindness to another person is to be in the moment in their presence, to be listening with care, and to be genuinely attentive to them. Schedule your day differently, and stop being known as the person who always rushes off. Being present means being available; you can only do this if you’re not rushing or squeezing in people and activities.
    • Ease off the technical means of communicating with others. Impersonal and hurried technical communications like text and email have their place in life, but not as your only means of communicating. Take time to connect with people face-to-face, or via an uninterrupted phone call. Send a letter instead of an email and surprise someone with the kindness of your having taken time out of your day to put pen to paper.

 

  1. Be a good listener. The act of listening is easier said than done in our fast-paced world, where rushing and being busy are seen as virtues; where cutting someone off because you’re too busy, or you need to get somewhere in a hurry, is the norm. Making being busy into a habit is no excuse for unkindness, however. When talking to someone, learn to listen with your whole being and sincerely pay attention to them until they’re done revealing their thoughts and story.
    • Truly listening to someone, making eye contact, avoiding all distractions, and giving a person the time of day is one of the greatest acts of kindness. Take the time to truly absorb what the person is saying before responding with a pre-made answer or interrupting. Show the person that you appreciate the unique situation he’s in and that you’re there to lend an ear.
    • Being a good listener doesn’t mean being a great problem solver. Sometimes, the best thing you can do is just be there to listen, while acknowledging that you don’t know what the person should do.

 

  1. Be optimistic. Happiness, joy, and gratitude rest at the heart of kindness, allowing you to see the good in others and the world, enabling you to press through the challenges, despair, and cruelty you witness and experience, continuously restoring your sense of faith in humanity. Maintaining an optimistic attitude ensures that acts of kindness are committed with genuine joy and cheerfulness rather than with reluctance or out of a sense of duty or service. And keeping your sense of humor ensures that you don’t take yourself too seriously and take life’s contradictory and contrary moments with good faith.
    • It’s not always easy to be optimistic, especially when you’ve had a crummy day. But with enough practice, anyone can cultivate optimism by focusing on the positive instead of the negative, thinking ahead to happy things in the future, and living a life that is filled with more joy than sadness. And it doesn’t cost a dollar to look on the brighter side of things, either.
    • Being optimistic and staying positive will not only put you in more of a mindset to be kind, but it will also bring joy to those around you. If you spend much of your time complaining, then it will be more difficult to bring happiness to the people in your orbit.
    • Read How to be happy, How to be funny, and How to be thankful for more information on how to cultivate optimism.

 

  1. Be friendly. People who are kind tend to also be friendly. This doesn’t mean they are the most outgoing people in the room, but that they make an effort to get to know new people and to make them feel at home. If there’s someone new at your school or workplace, you can try to talk to that person, explain how things work, and even invite him or her to social events. Even if you’re not outgoing, just smiling and making small talk with people can go a long way in making you friendlier, and this kindness will not go unnoticed.
    • Friendly people are kind because they expect the best from people. They talk to new people and friends alike in an easygoing, reassuring way that makes them feel at home.
    • If you’re naturally shy, you don’t have to change your personality completely. Just make a bit more of an effort to be nice to people by giving them your attention, asking them how they are, and showing an interest in them.

 

  1. Be polite. Although being polite is not an indication of kindness in itself, genuine politeness demonstrates your respect for those you’re interacting with. Being polite is the kind way of getting people’s attention and putting your point across. Some simple ways to do this include:
    • Find ways to rephrase your requests or responses to others. For example, say “May I?” instead of “Can I?”; say “I’m surprised” instead of “That’s not fair”; say “Let me explain that another way” instead of saying “That’s not what I said”. Rephrasing your language speaks volumes.
    • Have excellent manners. Hold doors open for people, avoid being overly vulgar in person, and don’t be overly familiar with new people.
    • Make compliments and mean them.
    • Read How to practice courtesy and kindness for more ideas.

 

  1. Be grateful. People who are truly kind are easily able to express gratitude. They don’t take anything for granted and always thank people for helping them out. They know how to say “thank you” and really mean it, they write thank-you cards, and they are comfortable with acknowledging when they have been helped. People who are grateful also thank people just because, for things like making their days brighter, instead of only thanking them for completing specific tasks. If you make a habit of being more grateful to the people around you, you’ll see that your capacity for kinds will increase.
    • If you’re more observant of all the nice things other people do for you, then you’ll be more ready to do nice things for others. You’ll be more aware of how good the kindness of others makes you feel and will feel more inclined to spread the love.

Be Kind

Part 3

Taking Action

  1. Love animals and the living world. Loving animals and caring for pets is kindness in action. Nothing compels you to care about beings of another species, especially in a day and age where the tools of human domination are so powerful. And yet, the very act of loving an animal and respecting the animal for its own value is an expression of deep kindness. As well, being kind to the world that sustains and nurtures us is sensible as well as kind, ensuring that we don’t poison the very elements that assure us a healthy life.
    • Adopt or foster a pet. Your kindness will be rewarded by letting another being into your life who will bring you joy and love.
    • Offer to pet-sit for a friend who is going away. Give your friend the reassurance that someone loving and caring will be tending to her pet while she’s away.
    • Respect the species you’re caring for. Humans don’t “own” animals; rather, we stand in a relationship of being responsible for their well-being and care.
    • Take time to restore parts of your local environment with the local community. Go for walks in nature with family, friends, alone, and commune with the world that you’re a part of. Share your love for nature with others, to help reawaken their sense of connection with nature.

 

  1. Share. People who are kind are happy to share with others. You can share your favorite sweater, half of your delicious enchilada, or even words of career advice to someone younger than you. The important thing is that you’re sharing something that you actually care about, instead of giving away something you don’t really need. It’s much more meaningful to let your friend borrow your favorite sweater than to give her an old hand-me-down you never wear. Sharing with people will make you more generous and thus, more inclined towards kindness.
    • Keep an eye out for people who would really benefit from some of the things you have. They may not always ask for them, but you can offer them readily before they admit that they need something from you.

 

  1. Smile more. Smiling is a simple act of kindness that can go a long way. Make a habit of smiling at strangers, or at your friends or acquaintances. Though you don’t have to walk around with a smile plastered on your face, smiling at people will make them smile back, and will bring even a modicum of joy to their days. What’s more, smiling can actually trick your mind into feeling happier than it previously was. Everybody wins when you smile, and your capacity for kindness will grow in the process.
    • Smiling at people will also make them more comfortable and will make you look more approachable, which is another way of being kind. Being welcoming to others, and even giving strangers the benefit of the doubt by smiling at them, is another way of being kind.

 

  1. Take an interest in people. People who are truly kind are genuinely interested in other people. They aren’t kind to them just because they want to get what they want or because they are fishing for a favor. They do it because they genuinely care about how people are doing and want those around them to be happy and healthy. To be more kind, work on developing an interest in other people and show them that you care by being attentive, asking questions, and paying attention to them. Here are some ways to take an interest in people:
    • Ask people how they are and mean it.
    • Ask people about their hobbies, interests, and families.
    • If someone you cared about had a big life event, ask that person how it went.
    • If someone you know has a big exam or interview coming up, wish him or her luck.
    • When you talk to people, make sure they are doing at least about half of the talking. Don’t dominate a conversation and focus more on the other person than yourself.
    • Make eye contact and put away your cell phone when you talk to people. Show that they are your first priority.

 

  1. Call up a friend just because. You don’t always need a reason to call up a good friend. Make a goal of calling one friend per week, or even two friends per week, just to catch up and see how that person is doing. Don’t call to make plans or to ask that person something specific; call just because you miss your friend and have been thinking about him or her. Getting in touch with your friends out of the blue will make them feel cared for and will make you feel good; this shows kindness and thoughtfulness.
    • If you’re really short on time, you can start by making a habit of calling up your friends on their birthdays. Don’t be lazy and send a text message or even a Facebook post, but give your friend a phone call from the heart.

 

  1. Donate your things. Another way to be kind is to donate some of your belongings to charity. Instead of throwing out your old things or selling them for 50 cents at a garage sale, donate the things you don’t need to a good cause. If you have clothes, books, or other household items that are in good condition, then making a habit of donating these things to charity instead of storing them up or tossing them is a great way to spread your kindness to others.
    • If you have some clothes or books that someone you know would want, then don’t be shy about donating those items to that person. This is another way of being kind.

 

  1. Do a random act of kindness. “Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.” These are the words once said by Princess Diana. The practice of random acts of kindness is alive and well as a conscious effort to spread more kindness; there are even groups that have established themselves to perform this essential civic duty! Here are some great random acts of kindness you can do:
    • Shovel a neighbor’s driveway as well as your own.
    • Wash a friend’s car.
    • Put money into an expired meter.
    • Help someone carry a heavy bag.
    • Leave a gift on someone’s doorstep.
    • For more details on practicing random acts of kindness, read How to practice random acts of kindness.

 

  1. Transform your life through kindness. Changing how you live and how you view the world might seem daunting. But take a note of Aldous Huxley’s prescription for transforming your life: “People often ask me what is the most effective technique for transforming their life. It is a little embarrassing that after years and years of research and experimentation, I have to say that the best answer is–just be a little kinder.”[11] Take Huxley’s many years of research to heart and allow kindness to transform your life, to transcend all feelings and actions of aggression, hate, despising, anger, fear, and self-deprecation, and to restore strength worn away by despair.
    • Through being kind, you take a stand by affirming that caring for others, for our environment, for yourself is the right way to live life.[12] It isn’t about immediate effectiveness; kindness is a lifestyle choice, a constant hum and rhythm accompanying every single thing that you think and do.
    • Through being kind, you let go of the burden of worrying that others have more than you, are less or more deserving than you, or are in a position of superiority or inferiority to you. Instead, kindness assumes everyone is worthy, you included.
    • Through being kind, you recognize that we are all in this together. When you harm another person, you also harm yourself. What you do to support others also supports you.

Community Q&A

  • How do I be kind when I am upset, sad, or grumpy?

Recognize your emotional state and find ways to calm yourself: deep breaths, taking some alone time, et cetera. Focus entirely on the other person. If you’re too upset to handle it, say “I’m upset and I can’t be a good listener right now.” Give yourself patience and time, and don’t push things before you’re ready.

 

  • How can I be kind to others when I feel empty or don’t care about others?

If you feel this way, you need to start by being kind to yourself first. You’re projecting what you feel deep inside about yourself — empty and without self care. Spend some time caring for your own self and needs first, perhaps getting counseling for unresolved issues that are holding you back from being your best self. When you learn to love yourself and take good care of you, then you’ll find it much easier to be kind to others.

 

  • How do you be nice to people when they are always attacking you, physically or emotionally?

Rise above and do your best to remove those people from your life. Dealing with not nice people isn’t always fun or fair, but you will thank yourself for staying true to your kind self.

  • How do I remain calm when I feel like someone’s using me?

If you feel like someone is using you, tell them your feelings directly. If they are your friend, they will not be mad at you for sharing your opinion. If you’re having trouble staying calm around this person, you may want to take a break from spending time with them.

 

  • Do I have to be kind even when some people never appreciate my kindness?

Being kind for the sake of being kind doesn’t require appreciation in return. If you place a condition on kindness, then it’s not really being kind. There are many reasons why people aren’t instantly or obviously appreciative, including astonishment, exhaustion, slowness to respond, obtuseness, quiet appreciation, etc. Some people are rude but that just means more kindness is needed. It may also help you to understand that it’s more about your karma, not theirs, without being a doormat, of course.

  • Am I ever too old to make this change?

No, you’re never too old. Everyone of every age can benefit from being kinder. If you’ve been mean your whole life, it might take people some time to adjust to your change of heart, but it’s worth it!

  • Why do we need to learn kindness from others?

It’s not so much about learning kindness as about unlearning all the defensiveness that socializing teaches us. We feel safer being defensive and self/family protective, and this is part of our ancient ancestral understandings that enhance survival. Kindness often forces us to put ourselves in other people’s shoes, to understand where they’re coming from even if we don’t usually think like them. It also requires a spirit of generosity and care for strangers, which can sometimes be difficult when we worry about our own/own family’s needs. Yet, kindness begets kindness, so it is often through seeing others’ kindness that we learn it has beneficial, supportive and caring outcomes that each of us aspires to in the greater scheme of life.

Source: http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Kind

 

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ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY AUGUST 2015 CLASS SCHEDULE ATLANTA, GA

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11 Secrets of Irresistible People

 

11 Secrets of Irresistible People

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Some people, regardless of what they lack—money, looks, or social connections—always radiate with energy and confidence. Even the most skeptical individuals find themselves enamored with these charming personalities.

These people are the life of every party. They’re the ones you turn to for help, advice, and companionship.

You just can’t get enough of them, and they leave you asking yourself, “What do they have that I don’t? What makes them so irresistible?”

The difference? Their sense of self-worth comes from within.

Irresistible people aren’t constantly searching for validation, because they’re confident enough to find it in themselves. There are certain habits they pursue every day to maintain this healthy perspective.

Since being irresistible isn’t the result of dumb luck, it’s time to study the habits of irresistible people so that you can use them to your benefit.

Get ready to say “hello” to a new, more irresistible you.

  1. They Treat EVERYONE With Respect

Whether interacting with their biggest client or a server taking their drink order, irresistible people are unfailingly polite and respectful. They understand that—no matter how nice they are to the person they’re having lunch with—it’s all for naught if that person witnesses them behaving badly toward someone else. Irresistible people treat everyone with respect because they believe they’re no better than anyone else.

  1. They Follow The Platinum Rule

The Golden Rule—treat others as you want to be treated—has a fatal flaw: it assumes that all people want to be treated the same way. It ignores that people are motivated by vastly different things. One person loves public recognition, while another loathes being the center of attention.

The Platinum Rule—treat others as they want to be treated—corrects that flaw. Irresistible people are great at reading other people, and they adjust their behavior and style to make others feel comfortable.

  1. They Ditch The Small Talk

There’s no surer way to prevent an emotional connection from forming during a conversation than by sticking to small talk. When you robotically approach people with small talk this puts their brains on autopilot and prevents them from having any real affinity for you. Irresistible people create connection and find depth even in short, every day conversations. Their genuine interest in other people makes it easy for them to ask good questions and relate what they’re told to other important facets of the speaker’s life.

  1. They Focus On People More Than Anything Else

Irresistible people possess an authentic interest in those around them. As a result, they don’t spend much time thinking about themselves. They don’t obsess over how well they’re liked, because they’re too busy focusing on the people they’re with. It’s what makes their irresistibility seem so effortless.

To put this habit to work for you, try putting down the smart phone and focusing on the people you’re with. Focus on what they’re saying, not what your response will be, or how what they’re saying will affect you. When people tell you something about themselves, follow up with open-ended questions to draw them out even more.

  1. They Don’t Try Too Hard

Irresistible people don’t dominate the conversation with stories about how smart and successful they are. It’s not that they’re resisting the urge to brag. The thought doesn’t even occur to them because they know how unlikeable people are who try too hard to get others to like them.

  1. They Recognize The Difference Between Fact And Opinion

Irresistible people handle controversial topics and touchy subjects with grace and poise. They don’t shrink from sharing their opinions, but they make it clear that they’re opinions, not facts. Whether discussing global warming, politics, vaccine schedules, or GMO foods, irresistible people recognize that many people who are just as intelligent as they are see things differently.

  1. They Are Authentic

Irresistible people are who they are. Nobody has to burn up energy or brainpower trying to guess their agenda or predict what they’ll do next. They do this because they know that no one likes a fake.

People gravitate toward authentic individuals because they know they can trust them. It’s easy to resist someone when you don’t know who they really are and how they really feel.

  1. They Have Integrity

People with high integrity are irresistible because they walk their talk, plain and simple. Integrity is a simple concept but a difficult thing to practice. To demonstrate integrity every day, irresistible people follow through, they avoid talking bad about other people, and they do the right thing, even when it hurts.

  1. They Smile

People naturally (and unconsciously) mirror the body language of the person they’re talking to. If you want people to find you irresistible, smile at them during conversations and they will unconsciously return the favor and feel good as a result.

  1. They Make An Effort To Look Their Best (Just Not Too Much Of An Effort)

There’s a massive difference between being presentable and being vain. Irresistible people understand that making an effort to look your best is comparable to cleaning your house before company comes—it’s a sign of respect for others. But once they’ve made themselves presentable, they stop thinking about it.

  1. They Find Reasons To Love Life

Irresistible people are positive and passionate. They’re never bored, because they see life as an amazing adventure and approach it with a joy that other people want to be a part of.

It’s not that irresistible people don’t have problems—even big ones—but they approach problems as temporary obstacles, not inescapable fate. When things go wrong, they remind themselves that a bad day is just one day, and they keep hope that tomorrow or next week or next month will be better.

Bringing It All Together

Irresistible people did not have fairy godmothers hovering over their cribs. They’ve simply perfected certain appealing qualities and habits that anyone can adopt as their own.

They think about other people more than they think about themselves, and they make other people feel liked, respected, understood, and seen. Just remember: the more you focus on others, the more irresistible you’ll be.

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SKILLS & ASSESSMENT BY ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, TIME, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The Harvard Business Review.
Dr. Travis Bradberry Influencer  Coauthor Emotional Intelligence 2.0 & President at TalentSmart

LOCAL CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT – JUNE ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASS SCHEDULE

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT
JUNE ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASS SCHEDULE


ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES IN ATLANTA 

ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY CLASSES:

Call Richard Taylor at 678-576-1913 for information or to register. 


Saturday Anger Management Class Schedule 


Georgia Approved Anger Management Certified Provider

 

Pay At Class or PrePay To Reserve Your Seat.
Limited Seating For 8 People At Executive Conference Table. 

June 6, 2015 
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200 

June 13, 2015 
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 20, 2015 
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 27, 2015 
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

July 4, 2015
NO CLASS – HAPPY 4th of JULY!

COUPLES: A Couple Attending At Same Time $300
Saves $100

Class Schedule May Change Without Notice so PrePay to Reserve your Seat and lock in your date. Best to NOT wait until last Saturday before your court date. Procrastinators often miss deadlines = often go to jail. 

NOTICE: If you PrePay for Unavailable Date your payment will be applied for next available Saturday. Call or email to follow-up for PREPAY payment made to insure good communication and your needs are met.


Be sure to get driving directions from Richard, often GPS gets people lost.

Call 678-576-1913 or E-MAIL TO SIGN UP

Visa MC AMEX CASH

VISA | MC |AMEX | CASH | PAYPAL Accepted | No Checks.

 

Judges, Solicitor General’s, Probation Officers, PreTrial Officers in different counties all have different anger management requirements to fulfill their needs for you. It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements. 

It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements.

  • All Payments Non Refundable.
  • Please call your contact and ask what they will accept/require.
     

ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY CLASSES IN ATLANTA

Call 678-576-1913 

Atlanta Anger Management Saturday Classes – Schedule 

The Saturday Anger Management Classes covers all the same Educational Information as our 8 Week Anger Management Classes. One Day Of Anger Management Classes. 

Court Approved in all 50 States, including metro Atlanta and all of Georgia. 

Atlanta Anger Management is an Anderson and Anderson™ Of Brentwood, CA Certified Anger Management Provider.

Atlanta Anger Management Website with more information

Week Day Anger Management Classes In Atlanta, GA

Monday Noon $25 Anger Management Class

Tuesday 6:30PM $30 and 8:00PM $25 Anger Management Classes

Wednesday 8:00PM $25 Anger Management Class

Thursday 6:30PM to 8:30PM $60 2 Classes In 1 Visit

Private One On One Anger Therapy Session

Couples Conflict Management Sessions

Couples Conflict Intensive Workshop (Offered 2x a Year)
Register Early for deep discounts on Attendance Fee

Emotional Intelligence Development and Training

EQi-2.0 Certified - Richard Taylor

Stress Management

 

 CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Richard TaylorAtlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Blood Alcohol Level Calculator

Blood Alcohol Level Calculator

Blood alcohol content, or BAC, is an important number that helps determine the level of alcohol in a person’s bloodstream. The higher the BAC, the more alcohol is likely to have an impact on everything from coordination and balance to emotions and brain function.

Controlling your alcohol intake and watching your BAC levels can help prevent harm both to yourself and to others. To make tracking your BAC levels easier, consider using our BAC calculator below. A BAC calculator will help do the math for you, providing an estimate of your current blood alcohol content.

1. Number of Drinks:

1
2
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8

2. What Are You Drinking?

reduced alc. beer 12oz
light beer 12oz
light canadian beer – 12oz 2.41%abv
canadian beer – 341ml 5%abv
canadian beer – 500ml 5%abv
canadian beer – 500ml 10%abv
imported beer 12oz
beer 12oz
malt liquor 12oz
common table wine 5oz
champagne 5oz
bloody mary
gin and tonic
highball
irish coffee
on the rocks
pina colada
screw driver
tom collins
whiskey sour
margarita
airline miniature
gimlet
old fashioned
mint julep
black russian
dry martini
fortified/dessert wine 5oz
manhattan
rob roy
double on the rocks
frozen daiquiri
harry buffalo

3.Your Weight: (lbs)

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240

4. How Long Have You Been Drinking?

0 hours
1 hour
2 hours
3 hours
4 hours
5 hours

Your Blood Alcohol Content* (BAC %):

Analysis:

 

How is BAC Determined?

Alcohol impacts your BAC in different ways, and can even impact various people differently. The most common way BAC is raised is through the number of drinks that a person consumes, on top of how many drinks you have and how quickly each drink is consumed in relation to each other.

Body weight can also play a role in determining BAC, as someone who weighs more has a higher water volume than someone who weighs less. This difference results in smaller people experiencing a greater impact from the same amount of alcohol ingested by larger people. Gender also impacts BAC, as women typically have a lower water volume in their bodies than men. To a lesser extent, recent food consumption, or the lack of food consumption, may also impact BAC.

How BAC Impacts the Body

Even a small amount of alcohol can impact both coordination and judgment when drinking, with each drink increasing your overall impairment. Too much alcohol and your body will ultimately shut down, resulting in organ failure and even death. It’s important to understand that individuals may react differently to alcohol intoxication at each BAC level. In general, they may exhibit some or all of the following symptoms and behaviors.

.02 BAC
At this level, the muscles start to relax. Inhibitions are also reduced, with many individuals experiencing a heightening of whatever mood they may have been in before they started drinking, whether that be a positive or a negative state of mind.

.05 BAC
Once you reach this level, you may start experiencing a mild euphoria. Your body temperature starts to feel elevated and your inhibitions become even more relaxed, along with an even greater exaggeration of mood.

.08 BAC
This is the legal BAC limit in many states, and typically for good reason. At this point you may think you’re not intoxicated, but your speech has started to slur, your ability to walk and stand starts to become more difficult and your reaction times slow. At this level of intoxication, motor skills are largely impacted and driving a car becomes dangerous (though for many, even at lower levels you should not be behind the wheel of a vehicle).

.10 BAC
At this level, your intoxication is more apparent both to yourselves and to those around you. Your judgement, memory, motor skills and balance are all reduced, and you start to forget just how many drinks you’ve had. Depending on the individual, you may become loud or belligerent. Men begin to experience difficulty achieving and maintaining an erection at this level.

.14 BAC
Once above .13, feelings of euphoria start to drop, and feelings of sickness, dizziness, and difficulty controlling the body take over. Each of the negative effects of drinking at lower alcohol concentrations are markedly more severe. At this point you may also start to black out.

.20 – .30 BAC
Alcohol sickness starts at this level, often resulting in vomiting. When this intoxicated, gag reflex is severely impacted, dramatically increasing the risks of choking on your own vomit. Blackouts are more frequent, and your memory starts to blackout as well. Pain sensors are dampened, which means that if you are injured at this point, you may not know it or feel the pain from it. This also reduces the chances you’ll go to get help.

.35 BAC
Once at .35, your blood alcohol level is similar to the effects of being under anesthesia. Your brain function is reduced, which also reduces your respiratory rate, causing you to potentially stop breathing.

.40 BAC
If you have not stopped breathing by this point, your body will most likely enter a coma state. Your heart rate will slow, and your chances of survival are very low.

Additional Consequences

Along with the physical consequences listed above, various potential social, financial and legal consequences may also occur with intoxication. For example, driving while intoxicated can not only injure you, but can also injure innocent people around you. In fact, an estimated 30 people die every day in the United States due to alcohol-related traffic accidents, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Even if you survive the accident, or not even cause an accident at all, you may still be faced with fines and jail time for driving under the influence (DUI). Once you’re allowed to drive again, you may see additional penalties in the form of increased insurance rates and difficulty finding companies that will take the risk to insure you.

Please Don’t Drink and Drive

All states have passed a .08 per se law. the final one took effect in august of 2005.  

* Calculations are estimates only and not to be relied upon for real life situations. This is because there are so many subtle differences, such as varying metabolic rates sex, medications being taken, how frequent drinks were taken, and other health issues. Therefore, this calculator should be used for general purpose information only.

Additional BAC details are available from the NHTSA

Disclaimer: This is in no way designed to be a guideline for how much you can legally drink! POSTING BY ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT is a Public Service Announcement. Use at your own risk. Best to not drink alcohol. If drinking use a Designated Driver or take a TAXI home.

SOURCE: http://www.sr22insurance.net/bac-calculator/

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT does not offer DUI classes. This is a Public Service Posting. Our clients often have Anger incidences while drinking and get arrested for Disorderly Conduct, Simple Battery, Battery, Assault, Simple Assault and Affray. Our clients have wondered how alcohol affects their brains and behaviors. Here is the answer.

ROAD RAGE HELP

ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES IN ATLANTA GA

INDIVIDUAL ANGER/COUPLE SESSIONS

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Richard TaylorAtlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Brevard County FL, Judge & Public Defender Fight – Anger Flares

Local
Posted: 6:39 a.m. Tuesday, June 3, 2014
Brevard judge tells attorney, ‘I’ll beat your ass,’ allegedly throws punches

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. —

Court deputies had to break up a physical fight between a Brevard County judge and a public defender after an argument during a hearing on Monday.

Judge John Murphy is accused of punching veteran public defender Andrew Weinstock after the two had words during court in which Murphy allegedly pressured Weinstock to get his client to waive his right to a speedy trial.

“You know, if I had a rock I would throw it at you right now,” Murphy tells Weinstock. “Stop pissing me off. Just sit down.”

“You know I’m the public defender. I have a right to be here and I have a right to stand and represent my client,” Weinstock said in the video.

The judge allegedly asked Weinstock to come to the back hallway, an area where there are no cameras, which is where the fight broke out.

“If you want to fight, let’s go out back and I’ll just beat your ass,” Murphy tells Weinstock before the two head out of the courtroom.

While Murphy and Weinstock could not be seen, the courtroom camera captured audio of the scuffle and several loud thuds that accompanied it.

Those inside the courtroom sat uncomfortably and then clapped when the altercation sounded as if it ended.

Weinstock’s supervisor told Channel 9 Weinstock thought they would just talk out the problem, but he said there were no words exchanged, just blows thrown by Murphy.

“The attorney said that immediately upon entering the hallway he was grabbed by the collar and began to be struck,” said Blaise Trettis, public defender of the 18th Judicial Court. “There was no discussion, no talk, not even time for anything. Just as soon as they’re in the hallway, the attorney was grabbed.”

Two deputies broke up the fight, and the attorney was immediately reassigned to another area so he and the judge would not have to interact with each other.

After the confrontation, Murphy went back into court and finished ruling over first appearances.

“I will catch my breath eventually,” Murphy said. “Man, I’m an old man.”

Murphy wasn’t arrested, and it doesn’t appear charges will be filed. However, the public defender’s office said the incident will be reported to the Florida Bar.

Source: http://m.wftv.com/news/news/local/brevard-judge-accused-punching-public-defender/ngCGC/

SATURDAY ANGER MANAGEMENT JUNE 2014 CLASS SCHEDULE

SATURDAY ANGER MANAGEMENT JUNE 2014 CLASS SCHEDULE ATLANTA, GA

Anger Management Classes In Atlanta, GA

SATURDAY ANGER MANAGEMENT JUNE 2014 CLASS SCHEDULE

ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY CLASSES:

ATLANTA SATURDAY CLASSES ANGER MANAGEMENT

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY CLASSES

_____________________________________________________

Call Richard Taylor at 678-576-1913 for information or to register.

June 7, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 14, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 21, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 28, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

 

Class Schedule May Change so Call to Reserve your Seat and lock in your date. Best to NOT wait until last Saturday before your court date. Procrastinators often miss deadlines = often go to jail.


Be sure to get driving directions from Richard, often GPS give you an inaccurate driving path. Your need for immediate driving help that may not always be available, due to scheduled appointments, on the phone with some one else, etc. Plan your trip to avoid frustration.


Call 678-576-1913 or E-MAIL TO REGISTER FOR FREE

 

Judges, Solicitor General’s, Probation Officers, Pre-Trial Officers in different counties all have different anger management requirements to fulfill their needs for you. It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements.

Some require:

ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY CLASSES IN ATLANTA

Call 678-576-1913

Atlanta Anger Management Saturday Classes – Schedule

The Saturday Anger Management Classes covers all the same Educational Information as our 8 Week Anger Management Classes. One Day Of Anger Management Classes.

Court Approved in all 50 States, including metro Atlanta and all of Georgia.

Atlanta Anger Management is an Anderson and Anderson™ Of Brentwood, CA
Certified Anger Management Provider.

______________________________________________________

ANGER MANAGEMENT SCHEDULE JUNE 2014

June 7, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 14, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 21, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

June 28, 2014
Saturday  CLASS [ 9:00AM to 5:30PM – 8 Hours ] $200

 

 

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

Atlanta’s #1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management

ROAD RAGE HELP

ROAD RAGE HELP

A new kind of road hazard is Aggressive Driving that can become Road Rage.

When driving watch for:

  • aggressive drivers who weave in and out of traffic
  • drivers who tailgate (follow too closely)
  • drive too fast on crowded highways
  • honk the horn frequently
  • drive with no regard for other drivers and their vechicles
  • drivers who cut you off
  • drivers who brake very fast – you might read end them
  • drivers who “squeeze’ in front of 18 wheel trucks
  • scream at you
  • obscene gestures
  • drivers who try to get you to talk to them while driving
  • drivers who change lanes when you do and seem to be chasing you
  • drivers who get in front of you and slam their brakes on

Today’s hectic, over crowded, fast-paced world, frustration levels are sky high, stress piles on with increasing number of people expressing this as angry driving.

Avoid Road Rage consequences with these tips:

  • aggressive and excessive speeding, particularly on congested highways
  • aggressive and excessive speeding in bad weather
  • speed causes nearly 1/3 of all fatal motor vehicle crashes
  • speeding reduces the time drivers have to avoid a crash or a dangerous situation and greatly increases the likelihood the crash will be severe.
  • The energy released in a collision at 60 mph is 200 percent greater than at 40 mph, even though the speed has increased by only 50 percent.

Control Yourself

  • Wind down before you crank it up
  • Avoid making other drivers angry by avoiding anger yourself
  • Anticipate situations and make plans accordingly.
  • Regular traffic reports in most cities alert you to the traffic congestion.
  • Allow extra driving time to remain stress free.
  • Learn alternate routes.
  • Find ways to relive daily stress such as Working Out (Exercise), Pilates, Meditation, Laughter Yoga, Conscious Breathing, Singing, taking Hot Baths at night.
  • If you plan a long road trip, take it in 8 to 10 hour stages.
  • Every three hours driving take a rest stop break.

Be Patient & Pay Attention – Avoid A Driving Assault

  1. Don’t yell or use obscene gestures.
  2. Don’t block the passing lane.
  3. Stay to the right if you are obstructing the flow of traffic.
  4. Always signal when changing lanes.
  5. Use your horn sparingly.
  6. Don’t tailgate.
  7. Cooperate
  8. Don’t compete on the road.
  9. Let other drivers merge into traffic in an orderly fashion.
  10. Don’t take another’s actions personally. Everybody makes mistakes.
  11. Don’t react to another driver’s uncivil behavior
  12. Avoid eye contact
  13. Don’t accelerate, brake or swerve suddenly, which can be seen as confrontational.
  14. If confronted by an aggressive driver, go to the nearest police station if you continue to be hassled or think you are being followed.
  15. Lock your doors.
  16. When stopped in traffic, leave enough space to pull out from behind the car you are following.
  17. Don’t be tempted to start a fight or carry any sort of weapon. These acts may provoke an assault.

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT – Richard Taylor offers Road Rage help both before you get arrested or after. It will cost you less if you come see Richard before since it seems going to jail costs between $1,000.00 and $8000.00 plus longer Anger Management – Road Rage Classes.

Call Richard Taylor of ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT for help at 678.576.1913 with your Aggressive Driving and Erratic Behavior behind the wheel of your vehicle.

Who Would Benefit:

–> While driving you get angry at the least thing.
–> You experience anger or rage frequently
–> You experience anger or rage with too much intensity
–> You experience rage often (irrational over reaction to an activating event)
–> Your driving becomes reckless
–> You want to drive fellow ‘idiot’ drivers off the road
–> You want to slam your auto into another vehicle
–> When you rage you lose time and don’t remember what happened
–> When you get ‘very angry, rant ‘ [RAGE] you alienate everyone around you
–> When you get ‘angry’ you want to destroy
–> You can’t help but break objects, kick doors, punch holes in the wall
–> You stuff feelings fairly well but need rage to let off steam
–> You don’t have many emotions ‘Mr Spock’
–> I like myself but not many others don’t
–> People seem to avoid me, or walk on “eggshells” around me

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Atlanta’s Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

CHOOSE TO BE HAPPY

CHOOSE TO BE HAPPY

Most people have a lot of random thoughts throughout the day.

Train yourself to intercept these thoughts and check them for the positive or negative bias.

By refocusing your thoughts to this moment you are now in (The Now, The Present) choose to focus on what you have to get done today, think of someone you love, think of what you are grateful for. Finish planning for the event in the future. For the later what things have to happen to have your event be perfect without a glitch. Focus on accepting your life as it is right now.

In Anger Management we teach steps to cope with your anger ~ rage reactions.

Consider these Happiness Steps.

1.  Increase Self Awareness by paying attention to your thoughts.

2. Become Intelligent With Your Emotions

3. Try to Identify Your Triggers

4. Change Your Beliefs

5.  Live In The Present MomentHappiness exists right now.

6. Accept What Is, Accept The People in your life as they are. You are not going to change them anyway.

7. Practice Attitude of Gratitude. We notice and acknowledge the good things in our lives, the people that surround us and the good they are. We appreciate the gift of life (we could be dead), all the things that make up our day. Even the bad things. We notice and overcome our reaction to them.

8. Be Honest With Yourself and Others

9. Choose To Be Happy (Optimistic) or to be a downer (Pessimistic). You choose. Optimistic people have energy, a bright side that attracts people. Pessimism bring people down and drive them away.

10. CHOOSE LOVE OR CHOOSE HATE.

Having happiness problems in your life?

Call Richard at 678.576.1913

Richard Taylor BS, CAMF

Richard Taylor BS, CAMF

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

HOME
WHO HAS ANGER
ANGER IS AN EMOTION
WHAT IS ANGER MANAGEMENT
DIRECTIONS

GA Certified Family Violence Intervention Programs

ASSESSMENTS FOR ANGER MANAGEMENT
ATLANTA COURT ORDERED ANGER VIOLENCE ASSESSMENTS
GEORGIA APPROVED ANGER MANAGEMENT CERTIFIED PROVIDER

COURT ORDERED ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES
Anger Management MONDAY NOON Group Class
Anger Management TUESDAY NIGHT Group Classes
Anger Management WEDNESDAY NIGHT Group Classes
Anger Management THURSDAY NIGHT 2 Hour Group Class

Anger Management One Day Saturday Course
Accelerated One Day Course – Monday to Friday For Individuals Need ASAP

SATURDAY ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES
ACCELERATED ONE DAY ANGER MANAGEMENT COURSE
PAY FOR ONE DAY ACCELERATED INTENSIVE ANGER MANAGEMENT
SCHEDULE OF ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES
TEEN ANGER HELP

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT CLASS IN ATLANTA
CERTIFIED ANGER MANAGEMENT ONE DAY COURSE FOR TRUCK DRIVERS

COUPLES CONFLICT INTENSIVE – COUPLES WORKSHOP
COUPLES CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
COUPLES COMMUNICATION CLASS

EXECUTIVE COACHING
VIP CONCIERGE ANGER MANAGEMENT COACHING SERVICES

RAGE MANAGEMENT – HELP
ROAD RAGE ANGER MANAGEMENT

ANGER MANAGEMENT BY TELEPHONE

P E A C E   O N    E A R T H

MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, ANGER MANAGMENT, CLASSES, IN ATLANTA

MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY
ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES IN ATLANTA

Richard Taylor Atlanta Anger Management

Updated: 11/20/2015

5555 Exterior From 4A Exit Ramp

ANGER MANAGEMENT
MONDAY NOON CLASS

Come join a Monday 12:00 NOON Class.

NOON to 1:00PM
Arrive by 11:55AM

No Drop Ins. By Approval. Call 678-576-1913 To Enroll.
No Enrollment Fees.

MONDAY NOON 12:00PM – 1:00PM (1 Hour) $25/Class
Small Classes up to five participants. Call to reserve your seat.

Pay $25.00 as you attend. | CASH | MC |  VISA | AMEX | No Checks.

ANGER MANAGEMENT
TUESDAY EVENING CLASSES

Come join a Tuesday Class.

No Drop Ins. By Approval. Call 678-576-1913 To Enroll.
No Enrollment Fees.

TUESDAY EVENINGS 6:30PM – 7:30PM (1 Hour) Prime Time : $30/Class
Small Classes up to five participants. Call to reserve your seat.

Pay $30.00 as you attend.

Take the number of classes you need to fulfill your referral requirements or call to discuss.

Arrive to front of building by 6:20PM
Richard will meet you at the front door of Building 5555
[Sign: Glenridge Highlands One]

TUESDAY EVENINGS 8:00PM – 9:00PM (1 Hour) $25/Class
Small Classes up to five participants. Call to reserve your seat.
Less traffic, cost less.

Pay $25.00 as you attend.

Take the number of classes you need to fulfill your referral requirements or call to discuss.

Arrive to front of building by 7:55PM
Richard will meet you at the front door of Building 5555
[Sign: Glenridge Highlands One]

Call 678-576-1913 for information and sign up.

Judges, Solicitor General’s, Probation Officers, PreTrial Officers in different counties all have different anger management requirements to fulfill their needs for you. It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements.

  • All Payments Non Refundable.
  • Please call your contact and ask what they will accept/require.


ANGER MANAGEMENT
WEDNESDAY EVENING CLASSES

Come join our most popular classes on Wednesday.

No Drop Ins. By Approval. Call 678-576-1913 To Enroll.
No Enrollment Fees.

WEDNESDAY EVENINGS 8:00PM – 9:00PM (1 Hour) $25/Class

Small Classes up to five participants. Call to reserve your seat.
Less traffic, cost less.

Pay $25.00 as you attend.

Take the number of classes you need to fulfill your referral requirements or call to discuss.

Arrive to front of building by 7:55PM
Richard will meet you at the front door of Building 5555
[Sign: Glenridge Highlands One]

Call 678-576-1913 for information and sign up.


ANGER MANAGEMENT
THURSDAY EVENING CLASS

Come join our 2 Hour Class on Thursday.

No Drop Ins. By Approval. Call 678-576-1913 To Enroll.
No Enrollment Fees.

THURSDAY EVENINGS 6:30PM – 8:30PM (2 Hour) $60/Class
$30/Hr x 2 hours Of Class = $60.00

Pay $60.00 as you attend. Cut your number of visits in half.

You save transportation cost and time, eco friendly.

  • 3 Classes ( 6 Hours)
  • 4 Classes ( 8 Hours)
  • 5 Classes (10 Hours)
  • 6 Classes (12 Hours)
  • 7 Classes (14 Hours)
  • 8 Classes (16 Hours)

Arrive to front of building by 6:20PM
Richard will meet you at the front door of Building 5555
[Sign: Glenridge Highlands One]

Call 678-576-1913 for information and sign up.

Judges, Solicitor General’s, Probation Officers, PreTrial Officers in different counties all have different anger management requirements to fulfill their needs for you. It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements.

  • All Payments Non Refundable.
  • Please call your contact and ask what they will accept/require.

ANGER MANAGEMENT SATURDAY ONE DAY 8 HOUR CLASS:
SATURDAYS More information
$25/Hr

3 Hours 1:30pm to 4:30pm $75.00
4 Hours 1:30pm to 5:30pm $100.00
6 Hours 9:00am to 4:00pm $150.00 (Includes AM, Lunch, PM breaks)
8 hours 9:00am to 5:30pm $200.00 (Includes AM, Lunch, PM breaks)

Call 678-576-1913 for information and sign up.

You save transportation cost and time, eco friendly.

NOTE: Our Standard Offering is 8 Hours Of Classes to cover most of the information needed to control your anger. We offer any number of hours of classes needed or wanted. Some individuals need 12 hours, 16 hours and even 24 hours of class time. Inquire to set up.

Judges, Solicitor General’s, Probation Officers, PreTrial Officers in different counties all have different anger management requirements to fulfill their needs for you. It is your responsibility to check with them and ask questions to what they will accept to fulfill your court requirements.

  • All Payments Non Refundable.
  • Please call your contact and ask what they will accept/require.

Saturday Conference Room


WHAT YOUR RECEIVE:

A.) All documents to relieve you of your case requirements.

B.) Certificate Of Completion Offered For All Who Complete Classes, hand signed by Director Richard Taylor and Corporate Seal.

C.) Letter Of Completion Addressed To Your Referring Party With All Your Case Particulars, Completion of # of Hours Required, Explains Our Methodology, and who we are.

D.) Work Book of Class Topics

E.) Richard Taylor Owner/Director experience and sense of humor allowing you a positive Anger Management experience that you actually learn some new Life skills to use to improve your performance at home, work and out in public.

F.) You receive a model of Anger Management with tools/methods that actually work. When used they will improve your interpersonal relationships in your personal, business and public life. You will be able to reduce your reaction to anger triggering events to more appropriate responses that enhance your life.

G.) Complimentary Designer Coffee, Hot Tea, Filtered Water
OK To Bring Your Own or Snacks

H.) Free Safe Parking, Building has 24/7 Security

We look forward to helping you! – Richard


WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

–> Court Ordered Clients Needing Anger Management Classes
–> Volunteer Clients
–> Angry People
–> Anger is appearing too often, too intense
–> Anger is affecting your relationships
–> Anger has become physical
–> Anger is becoming verbally abusive
–> Anger is appearing in your work life or while out in public
–> Couples with relationship issues and Anger is often felt
–> Road Ragers
–> Anger affecting your golf game
–> If you are stuck, don’t feel much
–> Sick of stuffing feelings
–> You are a passive Person
–> You say: “I never get angry.”
–> You are in a Toxic Relationship that is almost over
–> You are single but know anger affects your relationships
–> Bad Moods predominate each day
–> Your partner, friends or family tell you, “You need Anger Management.”

CONTACT:

Richard TaylorDirector Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers
Certified ​MHS ​Bar-On Emotional Intelligence​ EQ-i 2.0 ​Provider
Blogger at 
Atlanta Anger Management Blog​
Recognized Member by WWANA (Who’s Who Among Notable Alumni) 
NEWS: Appeared on CBS46 News 6:14PM 11/04/15​ “EXTREME ROAD RAGE”

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

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About.Me about.me/richardtaylorAAM

#1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider In Atlanta
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

USA nationally recognized as a leading ​Anger Management Expert​
Atlanta’s #1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
Court Certified and Approved For 50 US States
Unique High Conflict Management Relationship Coach​