Your Brain on Stress and Anxiety

Stress is the way our bodies and minds react to something which upsets our normal balance in life. Stress is how we feel and how our bodies react when we are fearful or anxious. Some level of stress has some upside to mind and body function to enable us to react in a positive way. Too much stress though, is both harmful to the body and our performance. How much is too much? Well, that depends… on you and how you respond.

It is essential to know how our brain responds to the stimuli which trigger an anxiety response so that you are equipped to deal appropriately with anxiety.

(Learn four simple brain hacks to overcome performance anxiety: https://youtu.be/FlgGLs1Cpcw)

Let me highlight the key areas of your brain that are involved, and then I will explain what happens inside the brain.

The Thalamus is the central hub for sights and sounds. The thalamus breaks down incoming visual cues by size, shape and colour, and auditory cues by volume and dissonance, and then signals the cortex.

The Cortex then gives raw sights and sounds meaning enabling you to be conscious of what you are seeing and hearing. And I’ll mention here that the prefrontal cortex is vital to turning off the anxiety response once the threat has passed.

The Amygdala is the emotional core of the brain whose primary role is to trigger the fear response. Information passing through the amygdala is associated with an emotional significance.

The bed nucleus of the stria terminals is particularly interesting when we discuss anxiety. While the amygdala sets off an immediate burst of fear whilst the BNST perpetuates the fear response, causing longer term unease typical of anxiety.

The Locus Ceruleus receives signals from the amygdala and initiates the classic anxiety response: rapid heartbeat, increased blood pressure, sweating and pupil dilation.

The Hippocampus is your memory centre storing raw information from the senses, along with emotional baggage attached to the data by the amygdala.

Now we know these key parts, what happens when we are anxious, stressed or fearful?

Anxiety, stress and, of course, fear are triggered primarily through your senses:

Sight and sound are first processed by the thalamus, filtering incoming cues and sent directly to the amygdala or the cortex.

Smells and touch go directly to the amygdala, bypassing the thalamus altogether. (This is why smells often evoke powerful memories or feelings).

Any cues from your incoming senses that are associated with a threat in the amygdala (real or not, current or not) are immediately processed to trigger the fear response. This is the expressway. It happens before you consciously feel the fear.

The Hippothalmus and Pituitary Gland cause the adrenal glands to pump out high levels of the stress hormone coritsol. Too much short circuits the cells of the hippocampus making it difficult to organize the memory of a trauma or stressful experience. Memories lose context and become fragmented.

The body’s sympathetic nervous system shifts into overdrive causing the heart to beat faster, blood pressure to rise and the lungs hyperventilate. Perspiration increases and the skin’s nerve endings tingle, causing goosebumps.

Your senses become hyper-alert, freezing you momentarily as you drink in every detail. Adrenaline floods to the muscles preparing you to fight or run away.

The brain shifts focus away from digestion to focus on potential dangers. Sometimes causing evacuation of the digestive tract thorough urination, defecation or vomiting. Heck, if you are about to be eaten as someone else’s dinner why bother digesting your own?

Only after the fear response has been activated does the conscious mind kick in. Some sensory information, takes a more thoughtful route from the thalamus to the cortex. The cortex decides whether the sensory information warrants a fear response. If the fear is a genuine threat in space and time, the cortex signals the amygdala to continue being on alert.

Fear is a good, useful response essential to survival. However, anxiety is a fear of something that cannot be located in space and time.

Most often it is that indefinable something triggered initially by something real that you sense, that in itself is not threatening but it is associated with a fearful memory. And the bed nucleus of the stria terminals perpetuate the fear response. Anxiety is a real fear response for the individual feeling anxious. Anxiety can be debilitating for the sufferer.

Now that you know how anxiety happens in your brain, we can pay attention to how we can deliberately use our pre-frontal cortex to turn off an inappropriate anxiety response once a threat has passed.

Background Nusic: My Elegant Redemption by Tim McMorris. http://audiojungle.net/item/my-elegan…

FInd out how we can help, http://www.gapps5.com

CONTACT

IN ATLANTA FOR ANGER, RAGE, STRESS, ANXIETY, EMOTION CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT.

Richard TaylorDirector Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Road Rage – When Driving List

Road Rage – When Driving List

ROAD RAGE IS…

Road Rage is often called intermittent explosive disorder, a term used to refer to violent incidents resulting from stress caused by accidents or incidents on roadways. It is often a natural extension of aggressive driving.

Road Rage frustration and aggression are often triggered by traffic conditions, being in a hurry, stress related to other pressures. Road Rage is a feeling of retaliating of awlfulizing the other driver. The other driver deserves retribution. We make a free choice in what we do. We choose how we are going to respond.

∇ Are you experiencing aggressive driving in your attitude when behind the wheel?

∇ Find yourself driving erratically?

∇ Getting ‘worked up” driving?

∇ Find yourself saying not nice things called Expletives?

∇ Driving definitely causing you a lot of stress?

Used With Permission Pixabay.com johnhain

 

 

Road Rage:

  • Occurs when a driver reacts angrily to other drivers
  • You cut off another driver
  • Tailgating
  • Gesturing or waving fist.
  • Flip off someone
  • Aggressive driving
  • Excessive speeds
  • Scream at another
  • Chase another car
  • Honk continuously at another car
  • Make threatening gestures
  • Try to injure or kill another driver
  • Name what you do: _______________

Road Rage is an symptom of an underlying issue with a driver. Impulse Control is a major issue. They are unable to remain in control of themselves or their emotions. Often stress is very high in your life. Perhaps your personal or business life is not going very well. Your anger spreads beyond driving creeping into other aspects of your life.

Choose to Calm Down and disengage from your stress.

 

For drivers who do not experience Road Rage knowing what might trigger a person is equally important.

 

Do not “flip off” someone with your middle finger. They may have a pistol in hand waiting for an excuse. Some people may just not like your look. Your race. Your hair color.

 

Atlanta has now become an aggressive driving city with too many cars and not enough roads.

 

Vote for more MARTA, High Speed Trains, Other Public Transportation ideas when they come up in Voting. Use MARTA when you can.

 

WHEN DRIVING:

  • Be calm
  • Listen to soothing music
  • Slow down
  • Take more time to get to your destination and expect delays
  • Plan your driving trip before you drive so you know where you are going. Use Google maps.
  • Plan to arrive 20 minutes early so if traffic bad you are not stressed
  • Become a better driver
  • If you have anxiety while driving take a driver education course in defensive driving
  • Be courteous while driving
  • Make appointments in non traffic times
  • Stop multi-tasking while driving
  • Stop talking on phone while driving
  • Stop looking at your phone while driving
  • Practice holding the steering wheel with two hands so your other hand does not auto multi-task
  • Allow a car beside you to get ahead of you when lane narrows
  • When a driver cuts in front of you abruptly, let it go and expect that again
  • Drive with 360 degree awareness paying attention to all sides, front, back, left, right (Zen Driving)
  • Anticipate traffic incidents with attentive awareness “reading” the traffic ahead of you
  • Practice Positive Self Talk and say things like “Calm Down” “I feel Calm” “No big deal”
  • Do not use expletives like idiot, stupid, asshole, *uck you, *ucker, Mother*ucker
  • Do not use expletives like _____________ _______________ _____________
  • Arrive safely to live another day

 

Remain Calm and Carry On. Repeat this to yourself.

Road Rage Help

See: What is Anger.

See: Do I Need Anger Management?

See: Rage Management

See: Road Rage Management

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Richard TaylorAtlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

 

Georgia Road Rage Tragedy

Georgia Road Rage Tragedy
Our hearts go out to this family and friends.
Stop the madness.

CBS Atlanta 46

CBS Tony McNary interviews family of Road Rage Victim death from Road Rage.

If you are get mad while driving ( Road Rage ) do something about it before tragedy strikes you and innocent people.

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT
ROAD RAGE COUNSELING EDUCATION

– Volunteer Rageful Drivers and Court Ordered Rageful Drivers –

You just experienced a driving episode of ” Road Rage”. You lost it and and a scary thing happened with another driver…it worked out but you admit it is time to find out how to control yourself better. You do not want to be charged with Road Rage and have to go to jail and be charged with an official Road Rage charge.

OR you have been charged with Road Rage and are required to attend Anger Management classes.

Call now and set things up with Richard at 678-576-1913.

Get help immediately before it is too late and consequences get out of hand. People are killed often in Road Rage incidents.

Do something now.

Richard understands, call 678-576-1913

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence