Sleep Deprivation: Why It Wrecks Your Waistline. Video: 25 Effects

7 Signs You Need More Sleep And Why It Wrecks Your Waistline

How many hours of sleep did you get last night, or the night before? In our go, go, go society, many of us end up shortchanged on snooze time.

Of course you already know that sleep is a necessary part of life, but you may not realize how much it actually affects your health, and even your waistline.

In addition to increasing stress levels and making us feel like we’re walking around in a fog, when we don’t get enough shut-eye, it can result in increased weight gain.

While it may seem like the more hours you’re up and around, the less you’d weigh due to the extra calorie burn, the opposite is actually true.

Surprising?

It’s all because hormones like ghrelin and leptin are thrown off balance, and, those hormones influence your appetite!

Ghrelin, sometimes referred to as the “hunger hormone,” is responsible for stimulating appetite. The higher level of ghrelin you have in your body, the hungrier you’ll feel.

Leptin, on the other hand, is in charge of letting the brain know when the body is full.

When your levels are normal, leptin helps to counteract ghrelin, which keeps hunger in check.

Sleep deprivation causes an increase in ghrelin levels, signaling hunger, while lowering leptin levels, which keeps you feeling hungry, even if you’ve just eaten.

Sleep deprivation also interrupts Cortisol level regulation, increasing cortisol adding stress!

Now it makes sense, right?

Gaining weight is one of the signs that you’re not getting enough rest.

In fact, those who sleep less than six hours each night, are more likely to be overweight.

Most adults need seven to nine hours of sleep, and the increasing use of laptops, tablets and other electronics are one of the factors contributing to the massive, collective slept debt. Of course, the long list of daily responsibilities that most of us have don’t help either.

If you aren’t sure whether or not sleep deprivation is affecting you, there are 7 tell-tale signs that signal it may be time to start heading to bed a bit earlier – and to avoid late-evening use of electronics, which increases alertness, making it more difficult to fall asleep.

  • 1 You’re constantly hungry

As I mentioned, sleep affects the production of the hormone grehlin, which is in charge of hunger as well as satiety. That means too little sleep makes you hungrier the next day – and, it also makes you crave less healthy foods, a double whammy so to speak.

  • 2 You’re getting drowsy during the day, and caffeine doesn’t cut it.

While this may seem obvious, many people think that feeling exhausted in the afternoon is normal. It’s not. It’s a big red flag that you’re not getting enough ZZZs at night. Sometimes the symptoms are more subtle, like yawning every five minutes or feeling the need to constantly refill your coffee cup.

  • 3 You aren’t looking your best.

Even a small amount of sleep deprivation can affect how you look. If your eyes are red, puffy, or you have dark under-eye circles, you probably need more rest.

  • 4 Your performance and/or productivity isn’t what it used to be.

Sleep deprivation can negatively affect the ability to focus, concentrate, make decisions and even find the right words to describe something simple. If your work is suffering, getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis may be one of the best ways to improve your overall performance and productivity levels.

  • 5 You keep losing your keys, your glasses or other important items.

Forgetfulness is a common sign of sleep deprivation. While getting eight hours of rest won’t magically tell you where in the world those glasses went, it might help you remember the next time you put them down.

  • 6 You’re more sensitive than usual.

If you’re crying at the drop of a hat, or just more sensitive to things than you usually are, it may not be PMS or other hormonal issues – try getting more sleep to see if it helps you feel more balanced.

  • 7 Your libido has disappeared.

The loss of libido, or the urge to have sex, is another sign of a lack of sleep. Getting some quality rest is likely to equal a happier, healthy sex life.

 If you’re having trouble falling asleep at night, try to:

  • set aside an hour before bed to prepare your body for rest.
  • Nix all electronic gadgets during that last 60 minutes of the day and do something to calm and relax.
  • You might take a warm bath, practice meditation or read a good book – just not on your Kindle as that little light signals the brain to be more alert.
  • Be sure your room is completely dark when it’s time to close your eyes, and that it’s free of noise. Investing in an eye mask and/or a pair of ear plugs can help too.

Hope you will use these tips and I wish you all sweet dreams!

Yours in Health,  Danette

Source: http://danettemay.com/7-signs-you-need-more-sleep-and-why-it-wrecks-your-waistline/

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Here’s the list:

25 It increases your risk of cancer
24 It causes you to gain weight
23 It increases inflammation throughout your body
22 It depresses you
21 It makes it harder to control your emotions
20 It makes it harder to read other people’s emotions
19 It weakens your immune system
18 It increases your risk of diabetes
17 It permanently damages your skin
16 It makes your brain “dirty”
15 It decreases your life expectancy
14 It reduces the effect of vaccines
13 It increases your risk of heart disease – 48% Increase
12 It tricks you
11 It causes high blood pressure
10 It causes irregular heart beats
9 It increases your risk of stroke
8 It makes you weaker
7 It destroys your bones
6 It increases chronic pains
5 It decreases your ability to cope with stress
4 It decreases your ability to respond under pressure
3 It kills creativity
2 It increases your risk of dying in a car accident exponentially
1 It causes memory loss

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STRESS AND BETTER SLEEP

STRESS AND BETTER SLEEP

Try To Get 7.5 to 8 Hours Of Sleep A Night To Feel Rested and Reduce Cortisol Levels
Cortisol is the stress hormone**.

Strategies that may help you sleep:

  • Reduce your caffeine intake. Caffeinated beverages can keep you up at night and increase the urge to urinate throughout the night. If you can’t cut caffeine out entirely, Hatipoglu* recommends to at least eliminate your intake of caffeine in the afternoon and evening.
  • Curb the use of electronics in the bedroom. Television is a no-no in the bedroom, as it will keep you up when you need to be focusing on resting. Watch TV in another room, and turn it off at least an hour before you want to nod off. Try reading a book or listening to relaxing music instead.
  • Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and calm. Removing all light from the room, using light-blocking curtains, and outfitting your bed with appropriate bedding helps to create an atmosphere that is conducive to sleep.
  • Create a regular bedtime schedule. Hatipoglu says you need to train your body to get a good night’s sleep. One of the most important ways you can do this is to create a scheduled bedtime and stick to it as closely as possible each night. You can incorporate things into this routine that get your body ready for bed, such as having a few sips of relaxing chamomile tea, meditating, or doing deep breathing exercises before you close your eyes.

“You need to identify the sources of your stress so you can start to deal with them in positive ways,” says Garcia-Banigan♦. Here are some suggestions:

  • Exercise more. Increasing the amount of exercise you get is a great way to burn off stress. Exercise can also help you reach or maintain a healthy weight and control your blood sugar. “If you can, you might want to bump up your exercise to about 60 minutes a day,” Garcia-Banigan advises.
  • Eat well. Maintaining good nutrition when you’re stressed helps control blood sugar levels. “You need to make sure to get the right nutrition so you have the energy to deal with stress,” Garcia-Banigan says.
  • Improve your coping style. Try replacing negative thoughts with positive thoughts, reducing the stress triggers you can, and being good to yourself. “Learn to manage your time well and make yourself a priority,” Garcia-Banigan says.
  • Learn stress reduction techniques. Breathing exercises, meditation, and progressive relaxation are all techniques that people have found to be helpful for stress management. Practice stress-relieving activities that work for you.
  • Get support. Talk to friends and loved ones about your feelings. Ask your caregivers about stress management assistance, and consider joining a support group where you can share feelings, ideas, and advice. Journaling helps.

* Betul Hatipoglu, MD, is a physician in the Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism.

♦ Dinamarie C. Garcia-Banigan, MD, MPH, an endocrinologist and diabetes specialist at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, MA

** “Stress hormones include cortisol, adrenalin, and growth hormone,” Dr. Arafah says. They all have the ability to increase blood sugar levels.”

STRESS MANAGEMENT HELP

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Stress Affects Your Health, Mind and Body

Stress Affects Your Health, Mind and Body

Stress can be highly personal, with one person’s unpleasant experience and another person’s who is unaffected by the experience. About 70 percent of doctor visits and 80 percent of serious illnesses may be exacerbated or linked to stress.

Stress Management long term fixes:

  • Exercise – 30″ Day / 5 Days
  • Yoga
  • Meditation – Daily
  • Conscious Breathing – Daily
  • Mindfulness
  • Progressive Relaxation – Daily
  • Journaling – Daily
  • Guided Meditation- Daily
  • Visualization
  • Biofeedback
  • Tai Chi
  • Qiqong
  • Tae Bo
  • Boxing
  • Short Term Fixes
  • More…

 

Stress Can Affect Your Health and Body in 23 Ways:

 

1. Fight or flight 50-60 times a day. The adrenals output hormones, such as cortisol & adrenaline that raises blood pressure and blood sugar. Not needed in most cases today. Over time it can be harmful to health.

2. Cravings Studies have linked cortisol to cravings for sugar and fat. Eat healthy meals/snacks when an attack of emotional eating occurs.

3. Fat storage “You can clearly correlate stress to weight gain,” says Philip Hagen, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The stress hormone cortisol may increase the amount of fat tissue your body hangs onto and enlarge the size of fat cells. Higher levels of cortisol have been linked to more abdominal belly fat.

4. Heart A recent study of 200,000 employees in Europe found that people who have stressful jobs and little decision-making power at work are 23% more likely to have a first heart attack than people with less job-related stress. Lead a heart-healthy lifestyle and focus on reducing stress in your life.

5. Insomnia Stress can cause hyper-arousal, a biological state in which people just don’t feel sleepy. See our Insomnia Blogs.

6. Headaches “Fight or flight” chemicals like adrenaline (epinephrine) and cortisol can cause tension headaches or migraines, either during the stress or in the “let-down” period afterwards. Stress also makes your muscles tense, which can make the pain of a migraine worse.

7. Memory Too much of the stress hormone cortisol can interfere with the brain’s ability to form new memories. During acute stress, the hormone also interferes with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that brain cells use to communicate with each other. That can make it hard to think straight or retrieve memories. A meditation practice should be implemented.

8. Hair Severe stress may even harm your hair. While the research is mixed, stress is thought to play a role in triggering hair loss in the autoimmune condition called alopecia areata. Stress and anxiety can also contribute to a disorder medically known as trichotillomania, in which people have a hard-to-resist urge to pull out the hair from their own scalp.

9. Pregnancy – Remain Calm. Stress may affect the ability to get pregnant. One study found that women with the highest levels of a stress-related substance called alpha-amylase were about 12% less likely to get pregnant each cycle than those with the lowest concentrations. During pregnancy severe stress, like losing a job or going through a divorce, can increase the chances of premature labor. There’s even some research suggesting that very high levels of stress can affect the developing fetal brain. Prenatal yoga and other stress-reduction techniques can help, so talk to your doctor if you’re severely stressed and pregnant.

10. Blood sugar Stress is known to raise blood sugar, and if you already have type 2 diabetes you may find that your blood sugar is higher when you are under stress.

One study of obese black women without diabetes found that those who produced more stress-related epinephrine when asked to recall stressful life events had higher fasting glucose and bigger blood sugar spikes than those with lower epinephrine, suggesting it might raise your risk for getting diabetes too. High swings in blood sugar equals early death.

11. Digestion Heartburn, stomach cramping, and diarrhea can all be caused by or worsened by stress. Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, which is characterized by pain and bouts of constipation and diarrhea is thought to be fueled in part by stress.

12. Blood pressure A stressful situation can raise your blood pressure temporarily. Chronic stress can cause more permanent changes in your blood pressure.

13. Brain tissue Brain-imaging research shows that major stresses can reduce the amount of tissue in regions of the brain that regulate emotions and self-control. This damage may make dealing with future stresses even harder. Reverse with effective stress-management techniques and neuroplasticity  practices.

14. Skin Stress can give you zits. Research suggests that students with acne are more prone to outbreaks during exams compared to less stressful time periods. An increase of male hormones known as androgens could be a culprit, particularly in women. Stress can also trigger psoriasis to appear for the first time or make an existing case more severe. Stress Management such as biofeedback and meditation can help.

15. Back pain Stress can set off an acute attack of back pain as well as contribute to ongoing chronic pain, due to the “fight or flight” response tensing your muscles. One European study found that people who are prone to anxiety and negative thinking are more likely to develop back pain, while a U.S. study tied anger and mental distress to ongoing back pain.

16. Sex appeal One study found that women were less attracted to men with high levels of the stress hormone cortisol compared to men with lower levels. Low levels of stress suggest strength, health and control which are desirable traits to be passed on to offspring.

17. Stroke A study of 20,000 people who had never had a stroke or heart disease found that stress was linked to an increased risk of stroke. In another recent study, healthy adults who had experienced a stressful life event within the past year were four times as likely to suffer a stroke than their less-stressed counterparts. Narrowing of the arteries (known as atherosclerosis) due to stress-related high blood pressure and diet.

18. Premature aging Traumatic events and chronic stress can both shorten telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of cell chromosomes, causing your cells to age faster.

19. Colds  Researchers believe stressed people’s immune cells may be less sensitive to a hormone that turns off inflammation reducing the immune system fight against the common colds and bronchitis.

20. Asthma Stress seems to exacerbate asthma in people who have the lung condition. In one study, children who experienced severe stress such as the death of a loved one had a nearly two-fold increase in the risk of an asthma attack over the following two weeks compared to those not under stress. Stress may amplify the immune response to asthma triggers such as pollen, animal dander, or dust.

21. Job performance Studies of employees ranging from military personnel to bankers show that stress reduces productivity and satisfaction at work, and is linked to depression too.

One solution is to ask your employer to offer stress-management training, which can address company-wide stressors like weak communication channels as well as focusing on stress busters for individuals. “Stress clearly has an effect on productivity, and the costs of that for employers can be very high,” Dr. Hagen points out.

22. Seizures Johns Hopkins Hospital Doctors have found that some people who are especially sensitive to stress can experience seizure-like symptoms, such as far-off staring and convulsions. Up to one-third of people treated for seizures at the hospital didn’t respond to standard anti-seizure medication and doctors concluded that they had stress-induced symptoms. Known as conversion disorder, some people can subconsciously express emotional trauma as physical symptoms, they say.

23. Sex drive Stressed out people have less sex and enjoy it less when they do get it as compared to people who aren’t under stress. Reducing and managing stress can often turn things around. If not, sexual dysfunction can have medical causes so it’s important to talk to a doctor.

–By Kate Fodor, Health.com – Edited by Richard Taylor

See Whole Article:
Courtesy of Health.com
http://t.healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/stress/23-surprising-ways-stress-affects-your-health#image=1
Copyright © 2013 Health Media Ventures, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

See our Stress Management Blogs for ways to reduce stress
or contact Richard Taylor, Principle Director of Atlanta Anger Management
to chat about your stress management needs and questions.

He offers One on One Private Sessions
as well as Stress Management Business On-site Seminars.

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate AAAMP

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

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