A FORCE FOR GOOD – The Dalai Lama’s Vision For Our World – New Book

A note from Dan Goleman:

As I was interviewing the Dalai Lama for my book A FORCE FOR GOOD: The Dalai Lama’s Vision for Our World, Paul Ekman’s work came up repeatedly. The Dalai Lama places great importance, for one, on Paul’s mapping the emotions – a tool that can help people get a better grip on their own. Then there’s the Cultivating Emotional Balance program¹, which has helped countless teachers and others mange their inner world better.

DanGolemanAs Paul makes clear in his book, there is the challenge the Dalai Lama poses to all of us, moving toward the ideal of universal compassion, an attitude that values every person on Earth equally.

In A FORCE FOR GOOD the Dalai Lama suggests we start with an emotional transformation toward greater calm, clarity, and compassion. Then, with this inner rudder, act to improve the world he spells out what our world needs in many spheres – ranging from transparency to dispel corruption in government and business, to a more caring economics, to healing the planet.

And he urges us to act now, in whatever way we can – even if we won’t see the results in our lifetime. We can change the future over the course of this century, if we all act to create this force for good, he urges.
Intriguingly, the arguments the Dalai Lama makes are not based in Buddhism, but rather in science.  He supports his views by drawing on the countless meetings he has had over the decades with world-class scientists – especially Paul’s work.

Paul Ekman Group Website

P.E.G.

Paul has spent more than 60 hours in one-on-one conversation with the Dalai Lama. As Paul puts it, they are like brothers.

Dr. Paul Ekman

Dr. Paul Ekman

Of all the many achievements over the course of Paul’s career, this may be the most remarkable. For one, even those close to the Dalai Lama’s inner circle find it difficult to schedule time with that ceaseless world traveler. For another, when Richard Davidson and I were considering which scientists to invite to participate in the Mind and Life meeting on “Destructive Emotions,” we had misgivings about Paul, despite his being at the top of our list.

Our hesitation had to do with Paul’s tough-mindedness as a scientist – we were unsure what his chemistry might be with the Dalai Lama – and we know that beyond first-class science, personal rapport made these meetings work. And, as Paul has said himself, at first during the meeting he had his own doubts. But on the third day there was a personal encounter with Paul and the Dalai Lama – when Paul introduced his daughter Eve, and the Dalai Lama held on to Paul’s hand as they spoke.

There was an almost electrical charge, as Paul has put it – and a subsequent deep change in Paul’s being. Where he had been quick to anger, as Paul describes, after that encounter he didn’t even have an angry thought for about nine months.

While most of us can’t hope for such a drastic inner transformation, any of us can begin the inner journey toward more peace and clarity.  As for myself, I find that meditation has offered a way to renew that state daily.

Cultivating Emotional Balance offers a range of approaches to emotional hygiene. There are countless methods.

But as the Dalai Lama emphasizes, that’s a first step. By also enhancing our own compassion, we become better able to act in ways that will add our energy to the force for good he calls us to create.

A Force For Good

A Force For Good

 

Daniel Goleman’s book A FORCE FOR GOOD: The Dalai Lama’s Vision for Our World, can be ordered at www.JoinAForce4Good.org/book.

 

Amazon Books

A Force for Good: The Dalai Lama’s Vision for Our World

by Daniel Goleman (Author), Dalai Lama (Introduction)

His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama  Of Tibet

His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama Of Tibet

For more than half a century, in such books as The Art of Happiness and The Dalai Lama’s Little Book of Inner Peace, the Dalai Lama has guided us along the path to compassion and taught us how to improve our inner lives. In A Force for Good, with the help of his longtime friend Daniel Goleman, the New York Times bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, the Dalai Lama explains how to turn our compassionate energy outward. This revelatory and inspiring work provides a singular vision for transforming the world in practical and positive ways.

Much more than just the most prominent exponent of Tibetan Buddhism, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama is also a futurist who possesses a profound understanding of current events and a remarkable canniness for modern social issues. When he takes the stage worldwide, people listen.

A Force for Good combines the central concepts of the Dalai Lama, empirical evidence that supports them, and true stories of people who are putting his ideas into action—showing how harnessing positive energies and directing them outward has lasting and meaningful effects. Goleman details the science of compassion and how this singular guiding motivation has the power to

• break such destructive social forces as corruption, collusion, and bias
• heal the planet by refocusing our concerns toward our impact on the systems that support all life
• reverse the tendency toward systemic inequity through transparency and accountability
• replace violence with dialogue
• counter us-and-them thinking by recognizing human oneness
• create new economic systems that work for everyone, not just the powerful and rich
• design schooling that teaches empathy, self-mastery, and ethics

Millions of people have turned to the Dalai Lama for his unparalleled insight into living happier, more purposeful lives. Now, when the world needs his guidance more than ever, he shows how every compassion-driven human act—no matter how small—is integral for a more peaceful, harmonious world, building a force for a better future.

Revelatory, motivating, and highly persuasive, A Force for Good is arguably the most important work from one of the world’s most influential spiritual and political figures.

Understand the Force

 Understand the Force

EMBODY COMPASSION

EDUCATE THE HEART

OPPOSE INJUSTICE

CHOOSE HUMANE ECONOMICS

HELP THOSE IN NEED

HEAL THE EARTH

CONNECT ACROSS DIVIDES

 

For local help managing your emotions through:

  • Emotional Intelligence Development
  • Anger Management
  • Stress Management
  • Improved Communications
  • Conflict Management
  • Developing Sound Relationships
  • Coping Strategies
  • Conscious Breathing
  • Laughter Yoga
  • Introduction to Mindfulness
  • Balance of Physical, Mental, Emotional, Spiritual Domains

CONTACT

Richard TaylorDirector Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

Atlanta’s #1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

 

______________________________________________
REFERENCES
¹ Cultivating Emotional Balance Research Project

About Cultivating Emotional Balance

Cultivating Emotional Balance is a research project, which arose from a dialogue between biobehavioral scientists studying emotion and the Dalai Lama, Buddhist monks, and scholars at the Mind and Life Institute in Dharamsala, India in March of 2000. This meeting was one in a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute to foster an interchange between Buddhist tradition and Western science.

At this meeting, the Dalai Lama asked scientists if they could conduct research to determine whether or not secularized Buddhist practices would be helpful to Westerners dealing with “destructive” emotional experiences. In response to this request, Dr. Paul Ekman and Dr. B. Alan Wallace, developed a training program that integrated Buddhist contemplative practices with Western techniques for dealing with negative emotional experiences. The training’s purpose is to reduce emotional responses that are destructive to self and others and enhance compassion and empathy. This research project, “Cultivating Emotional Balance In Challenging Times” (CEB), is the result of that interchange.

Over the centuries, Buddhism has refined meditation methods which probe the nature of the mind and promote positive states of mind, including compassion. Decades of scientific research has been conducted on altruism, empathy, pro-social behavior, and other concepts that relate directly to compassion. However, there are almost no studies in scientific literature that have found any form of training or intervention that can increase compassion. In fact, there is no agreed upon definition of compassion in the scientific literature.

In these challenging times, the development of methods for “cultivating emotional balance” and promoting compassion for others is a tremendously important scientific and humanitarian goal. By integrating wisdom derived from two very different traditions, the CEB project investigators hope to contribute to this important goal.

Visit Website: http://www.cultivatingemotionalbalance.org/?q=content/home

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SERIES I

Emotional Intelligence – What is it anyway?
 
Emotional Intelligence – Series Part I
 
The term “Emotional Intelligence” is used today as if “everyone” knew what the term means with all of its ramifications. As I introduce the term and concept in our Atlanta Anger Management, Anderson and Anderson™ , Anger Management Classes very few people have actually heard the term and know what it means.

This Emotional Intelligence Series will try to investigate the term and expand on its meaning and practical applications in everyday life. Join in the investigation if you have anything to add, ask, or correct.

“Emotional Intelligence” the term, was coined and formally defined by John (Jack) Mayer of the University of New Hampshire and Peter Salovey of Yale University in 1990.  1

They expanded on the concept by Howard Gardner (1983) while at Harvard University that multiple intelligences may exist in humans including an aptitude for introspection and “personal intelligence.”

Mayer and Salovey joined with their fellow colleague David Caruso to create a Emotional Intelligence (EQ) measuring instrument they named Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

Also working in the field was Dr. Reuven Bar-On and by 1985 developed the concept of Emotional Quotient (EQ). He believed that our intelligence was made up both IQ but also of overlapping distinct attitudes and skills that he later defined into an instrument for measurement he called Emotional Quotient Inventory or for short EQ-i®

Of course there were many others all working separately on different concepts related to intelligence other than Intelligence Quotient (IQ). IQ had already been accepted and used in schools in many countries to measure students cognitive or rational aptitudes to determine “how smart” they were.

NOTE: This article is not a complete history of Emotional Intelligence. It is to open up the term to the “public” everyday person, so this portion is brief to keep things moving.

Daniel Jay Goleman is an author, psychologist, and science journalist who was writing for The New York Times (12 years) specializing in psychology and brain sciences. He studied and complied years worth of research in the field of psychological functioning and personal skills and in 1995 authored the book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. 2

As they say, “the rest is history”. The book was on the New York Times Best Sellers list for more than 1 1/2 years explaining that Emotional Intelligence existed with lots of research to back up the premise that EQ often is more important to the individual than one’s IQ as a determining factor for success in life.

There was a time when IQ was considered the leading determinant of success. In this fascinating book, based on brain and behavioral research, Daniel Goleman argues that our IQ-idolizing view of intelligence is far too narrow. Instead, Goleman makes the case for “emotional intelligence” being the strongest indicator of human success.  He defines emotional intelligence in terms of self-awareness, altruism,  personal motivation, empathy, and the ability to love and be loved by
friends, partners, and family members. People who possess high emotional  intelligence are the people who truly succeed in work as well as play, building flourishing careers and lasting, meaningful relationships. Because emotional intelligence isn’t fixed at birth, Goleman outlines how adults as well as parents of young children can sow the seeds. 3

So Mr. Goleman defines a set of skills: self-awareness, including control of one’s impulses, self-motivation, empathy and social competence in interpersonal relationships that determine one’s effectiveness in negotiating life.

Peter Salovey and Jack Mayer describe Emotional Intelligence as “the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional meanings, and to reflectively regulate emotions in a way that promote emotional and intellectual growth.” 4

For people who need anger management, Emotional Intelligence is a key in learning to increase self-awareness and control one’s impulses along with many other skill sets that we will be looking at in the upcoming article series.
 

Next in series (II)
 
Emotional Intelligence – What is it anyway? Part Two

 

George Anderson of Anderson and Anderson is a pioneer in the field of Anger Management and has Emotional Intelligence as one of the key four “anchors’ of his model of anger management curriculum. He now has become one of the forerunners in using Emotional Intelligence testing instruments such as the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 to help determine an individual’s strengths and weaknesses in Emotional Intelligence and provides coaching to help improve deficient areas. All Anderson and Anderson™ Certified Anger Management Providers (CAMF) are now trained in administering the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0 through Anderson and Anderson™ .

Mr. George Anderson also uses it in his Disruptive Physicians work.
 
Richard Taylor also offers Emotional Intelligence coaching in Atlanta to the public
and can fly to your location or do phone/Skype consults for Individuals – Attorneys – Business – Corporations –  Government – Universities & Colleges – Hospital Staff (not Physicians).
 
CONTACT:
 
Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

A Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Trusted Name In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence
 
 
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1. P. Salovey and J.D. Mayer, “Emotional Intelligence”, Imagination, Cognition, and Personality, 9 (1990): 185-211.

2. Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (New York: Bantam, (1995)

3. Amazon.com Review
Source: http://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Intelligence-Matter-More-Than/dp/055338371X

4. J.D. Mayer, P. Salovery, and D. Caruso, Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCIET) User’s Manual (Toronto: Multi-Health Systems, 2002).

Emotional Intelligence The Next Generation

Emotional Intelligence, The Next Generation.

By Mr. George Anderson of Anderson and Anderson™
Edited by Richard Taylor for Atlanta Anger Management Application

The Anderson & Anderson™ Anger Management Model includes Emotional Intelligence as one of its key components.

  • Emotional Intelligence Training – Personal Coaching One on One
  • Emotional Intelligence Training – Business Organizational Seminars Training Conclaves
  • Anger Management – Personal Coaching One on One
  • Anger Management Group Classes Week Night Evenings
  • Anger Management Saturdays One Day Course (Program)
  • Anger Management Accelerated One Day Trainings (Intensives).

For information about training classes in Emotional Intelligence and / or Anger Management, please contact Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF of Atlanta Anger Management in Atlanta, GA. Please call: 678-576-1913

Emotional Intelligence has become one of the hottest buzz words in the business world. When Harvard Business Review published an article on the topic a few years ago, it attracted a higher percentage of readers than any other article published in that periodical in the last 40 years.

Emotional intelligence is the capacity to appropriately respond to emotional stimuli in a way which leads to positive outcomes in yourself and others. (EQ) is a learned ability to identity, experience, understand, and express human emotions in healthyand productive ways.

It is a relatively new concept which was popularized in 1995 by Dr. Daniel Goleman in two books; “Emotional Intelligence” and “Emotional Intelligence At Work”.

My own interest in emotional intelligence began about 7 years ago. At that time, I was conducting research for a curriculum for anger management classes. Previous anger management models tended to focus on what happens to the body and mind

when a person is under stress or anger. Emotional intelligence provided an intervention with a different set of skills which includes managing anger, stress, improving communication and emotional intelligence.

Emotional Intelligence is a key component in the Anderson & Anderson™ Model of Anger Management Intervention.

In contrast to IQ, which is the ability to manipulate objects and master precision learning, emotional intelligence can be changed, improved at any stage of life. In contrast, IQ remains stable over time and does not predict success in life or relationships.

Research by Goleman and others have shown that success in life and work is not determined by IQ but rather by emotional intelligence (EQ). The brightest students do not necessarily become the most successful. The emotionally intelligent person is the one who is aware of his own feelings, moods, assets and limitations and is sensitive, empathic and compassionate to others. He or she has the capacity to actively listen to others, give feedback and positively influence others that lead to win – win situations.

By improving your emotional intelligence you will be better able to positively influence both your overall performance and well-being, and get incredible results from your work and life. A growing body of research suggests that emotional intelligence is a better predictor of success that the more traditional measures. In fact, EQ may be the single most important factor in predicting success.

There is now a considerable body of research suggesting that a person’s ability to perceive, identify, and manage their emotions provides the basis for the kinds of social and emotional competencies that are important for success in almost any job.

This research indicated that only 20% of your success is contributed by your IQ. With 36% attributable to your emotional intelligence. At least 90% of the difference between outstanding and average leaders is related to emotional intelligence and explains why some people excel while others of the same caliber lag behind. It has been clearly established that emotional intelligence is linked to important work-related outcomes such as individual performance and organizational productivity.

Emotional Intelligence matters most in times of change. It is a measure of your ability to recognize and manage your own feelings and those of other people (staff, colleagues and customers) to produce results and traditional management skills. It is equally important when selecting the next generation of leaders.

The skills taught in an emotional intelligence coaching or classes
may include some or all of the following:

  • interpersonal awareness
  • self control
  • anger management
  • interpersonal assertion
  • listening skills
  • empathy, compassion
  • improving communication style for better outcomes
  • self-esteem
  • stress management
  • commitment
  • motivation
  • social awareness
  • flexibility
  • relationship management
  • problem solving – decision making
  • time management
  • leadership

How do issues like substance abuse, anger management and violence relate?

They are the result of unresolved conflicts relating to personal growth and a lack of knowledge about the process of making positive personal changes. Self-defeating and destructive living patterns are the result of learned behavior, any behavior which is learned can be unlearned.

When you work with other people, your relationship with them can really matter.

Using emotional intelligence is all about getting the most out of these relationships in ways that benefit everyone. Whenever you need to work with other people to deliver business outcomes, having the skills to work effectively with them will help you create a better solution and stronger relationships.

When you learn to recognize other’s emotions, you immediately begin to have greater empathy with them and to better connect with them. This gives you an advantage when working in a team.

Sometimes we respond to situations and people in ways that we may regret. It’s harder to rebuild bridges than it is to establish them. Using emotional intelligence allows you to develop strategies to respond to others comments, incidents and events that would normally push your emotional buttons.

It’s never easy to deal with conflict, but when you are aware of what drives conflict, you will be able to not just cope with the situation, but be able to diffuse the emotions that always accompanies conflict. When you know your own skills and abilities, you can focus on developing in areas that will benefit you most.

Here are some of the skills that can be developed through Emotional Intelligence:

  • Emotional Competency: constitutes the capacity to tactfully respond to emotional stimuli elicited by various situations, having high self-esteem and optimism, communication, tackling emotional upsets such as frustration, conflicts, inferiority complexes, enjoying emotions, doings what succeeds, ability to relate to others.
  • Emotional Maturity: constitutes evaluating your own emotions and those of others. The capacity to identity and express feelings. The ability to balance the state of your heart and mind. Being adaptable and flexible, appreciating other’s point of view, developing others, and delaying gratification of immediate psychological satisfaction.
  • Emotional Sensitivity: constitutes understanding the threshold of emotional arousal, managing the immediate environment, maintain rapport, harmony and comfort with others, letting others feel comfortable in your company while you feel comfortable in your own skin, empathy.
  • Customer Service: learning how to help your customers feel heard, understood, helped, served, respected, valued and important.
  • Hiring: Selecting employees with relatively high emotional intelligence, emotionally sensitive, aware, optimistic, resilient, positive, and responsible.
  • Turnover: Reducing turnover, reduction through helping employees feel appreciated, recognized, supported challenged, rewarded and respected.
  • Training: Raising emotional intelligence at all levels of the business through emotional literacy and emotional intelligence workshops.
  • Corporate Culture: Creating an environment where employees feel safe, trusted, special, needed, included, important, cooperative, focused, productive, motivated, respected and valued.
  • Productivity: Developing intrinsic motivation. Increasing employee commitment, cooperation and cohesion. Reducing lost time spent on conflict, turf-battles, defensiveness and insecurity.
  • Goal Setting: Setting goals based on feelings and hard data. For example, stating the goal that we want customers to feel satisfied, appreciated, and setting similar goals for employees. By adding emotions to Goal Settings it keeps direction appealing to the human side of goals and for better outcomes. Seek feedback on feelings, measuring and tracking performance. Often a second round is required with adjusted goals to get to the expected finish line.
  • Leadership: A leader with high emotional intelligence is emotionally aware. This means that he or she is aware of his own feelings and is not limited to logic, intellect and reasons when making decisions and managing people.

For information about training classes in Emotional Intelligence and / or Anger Management, please contact  Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF of Atlanta Anger Management in Atlanta, GA. Please call: 678-576-1913

Note:
Inquires for “Disruptive Physicians” call Mr. George Anderson directly at 310-207-3591

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator™

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam