DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST MEN

Domestic Violence Against Men

Revised: May 31, 2013

Statistics About Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men

Very little in known about the actual number of men who are in a domestic relationship in which they are abused or treated violently by women.  In 100 domestic violence situations approximately 40 cases involve violence by women against men.  An estimated 400,000 women per year are abused or treated violently in the United States by their spouse or intimate partner.  This means that roughly 300,000 to 400,000 men are treated violently by their wife or girl friend.

For more information see www.dvmen.org  |  http://www.ejfi.org/DV/dv.htm

Why Do We Know So Little About Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men?

There are many reasons why we don’t know more about domestic abuse and violence against men.  First of all, the incidence of domestic violence reported men appears to be so low that it is hard to get reliable estimates.  In addition, it has taken years of advocacy and support to encourage women to report domestic violence. Virtually nothing has been done to encourage men to report abuse.  The idea that men could be victims of domestic abuse and violence is so unthinkable that many men will not even attempt to report the situation.

The dynamic of domestic abuse and violence is also different between men and women.  The reasons, purposes and motivations are often very different between sexes.  Although the counseling and psychological community have responded to domestic abuse and violence against women, there has been very little investment in resources to address and understand the issues of domestic abuse and violence against men.

In most cases, the actual physical damage inflicted by men is so much greater than the actual physical harm inflected by women.  The impact of domestic violence is less apparent and less likely to come to the attention of others when men are abused.

For example, it is assumed than a man with a bruise or black eye was in a fight with another man or was injured on the job or playing contact sports.  Even when men do report domestic abuse and violence, most people are so astonished men usually end up feeling like nobody believes them.

The Problem With Assumptions About Domestic Abuse And Violence

It is a widely held assumption that women are always the victims and men are always the perpetrators.   Between 50 and 60% of all domestic abuse and violence is against women.   There are many reasons why people assume men are never victims and why women often ignore the possibility.  For one thing, domestic abuse and violence has been minimized, justified and ignored for a very long time.   Women are now more organized, supportive and outspoken about the epidemic of domestic abuse and violence against women.  Very little attention has been paid to the issue of domestic abuse and violence against men – especially  because violence against women has been so obvious and was ignored for so long.

What Is Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men?

There are no absolute rules for understanding the emotional differences between men and women. There are principles and dynamics that allow interpretation of individual situations.

Domestic abuse and violence against men and women have some similarities and difference.

For men or women, domestic violence includes:

  • pushing
  • slapping
  • hitting
  • throwing objects
  • forcing or slamming a door
  • striking the other person with an object
  • using a weapon
  • can also be mental or emotional.

 

However, what will hurt a man mentally and emotionally, can in some cases be very different from what hurts a woman.  For some men, being called a coward, impotent or a failure can have a very different psychological impact than it would on a women.  Unkind and cruel words hurt, but they can hurt in different ways and linger in different ways.  In most cases, men are more deeply affected by emotional abuse than physical abuse.

For example, the ability to tolerate and “brush off” a physical assault by women in front of other men can in some cases reassure a man that he is strong and communicate to other men that he can live up to the code of never hitting a woman.

A significant number of of men are overly sensitive to emotional and psychological abuse.  In some cases, humiliating a man emotionally in front of other men can be more devastating than physical abuse.  Some professionals have observed that mental and emotional abuse can be an area where women are often more “brutal” than men.  Men on the other hand are quicker to resort to physical abuse and they are more capable of physical assaults that are more brutal – even deadly!.

Why Does Domestic Abuse Against Men Go Unrecognized?

Domestic violence against men goes unrecognized for the following reasons:

  • The incidence of domestic violence against men appears to be so low that it is hard to get reliable estimates.
  • It has taken years of advocacy and support to encourage women to report domestic violence. Virtually nothing has been done to encourage men to report abuse.
  • The idea that men could be victims of domestic abuse and violence is so unthinkable to most people that many men will not even attempt to report the situation.
  • The counseling and psychological community have responded to domestic abuse and violence against women. Not enough has been done to stop abuse against women.  There has been very little investment in resources to address the issues of domestic abuse and violence against men.
  • In most cases, the actual physical damage inflicted by men is so much greater than the actual physical harm inflected by women.  The impact of domestic violence is less apparent and less likely to come to the attention of others.
  • Even when men do report domestic abuse and violence, most people are so astonished, men usually end up feeling like nobody would believe them.  It is widely assumed than a man with a bruise or black eye was in a fight with another man or was injured on the job or while playing contact sports.  Women generally don’t do those things.

What Are The Characteristics Of Women Who Are Abusive And Violent?

The characteristics of men or women who are abusive fall into three categories.

  • Alcohol Abuse.  Alcohol abuse is a major cause and trigger in domestic violence.  People who are intoxicated have less impulse control, are easily frustrated, have greater misunderstandings and are generally prone to resort to violence as a solution to problems. Women who abuse men are frequently alcoholics.
  • Psychological Disorders.  There are certain psychological problems, primarily personality disorders,  in which women are characteristically abusive and violent toward men.   Borderline personality disorder is a diagnosis that is found almost exclusively with women.  Approximately 1 to 2 percent of all women have a Borderline Personality disorder.  At least 50% of all domestic abuse and violence against men is associated with woman who have a Borderline Personality disorder. The disorder is also associated with suicidal behavior, severe mood swings, lying, sexual problems and alcohol abuse.
  • Unrealistic expectations, assumptions and conclusions.   Women who are abusive toward men usually have unrealistic expectations and make unrealistic demands of men.  These women will typically experience repeated episodes of depression, anxiety, frustration and irritability which they attribute to a man’s behavior.  In fact, their mental and emotional state is the result of their own insecurities, emotional problems, trauma during childhood or even withdrawal from alcohol.   They blame men rather than admit their problems, take responsibility for how they live their lives or do something about how they make themselves miserable.  They refuse to enter treatment and may even insist the man needs treatment.   Instead of helping themselves, they  blame a man for how they feel and believe that a man should do something to make them feel better. They will often medicate their emotions with alcohol.  When men can’t make them feel better, these women become frustrated and assume that men are doing this on purpose.

A Common Dynamic:  How Violence ERUPTS

There are a number of commonly reported interactions in which violence against men erupts.

Here is one example that illustrates a common dynamic.

The woman is mildly distressed and upset. The man notices her distress and then worries she may become angry.   The woman attempts to communicate and discuss her feelings.  She wants to talk, feel supported and feel less alone.   She initially attributes some of her distress or problems to him.  The man begins to feel defensive, shuts down emotionally and attempts to deal with the problems rationally.  He feels a fight is coming on.  The woman feels uncared for, ignored and then gets angry.  She wants him to share the problem and he doesn’t feel he has a problem.  The man will attempt to remain unemotional and stay in control of himself.  He avoids accepting any blame for how she feels.  He is also worried that she may explode at any moment and that she will certainly do so if he talks about his feelings. The man will start talking about her problem as if she could feel better if she would only listen to him and stop acting so upset.  He fails to understand how she feels and tries to remain calm.  He tells her to calm down and ends up looking insensitive.  She begins to wonder if he has any feelings at all.  She tells him that he thinks he’s perfect.   He says he is not perfect.  She calls him insensitive.  He stares at her and says nothing but looks irritated.

The woman is frustrated that he won’t reveal his feelings and that he acts like he is in control.  On the other hand, the man feels out of control and like there is no room for anybody’s feelings in the conversation but hers. Communication breaks down and the woman begins to insult the man.  When the man finally expresses his disapproval and attempts to end the fight.  The woman becomes enraged and may throw something.  The man will usually endure insults and interactions like this for weeks or months.  This whole pattern becomes a recurrent and all too familiar experience.   The man becomes increasingly sensitive to how the woman acts and becomes avoidant and unsupportive.  The man begins to believe that there is nothing he can do and that it may be all his fault.  His frustration and anger can build for months like this.

This risk of violence  increases when the woman insults the man in front of their children, threatens the man’s relationship with his children, or she refuses to control her abusive behavior when the children are present.  She may call him a terrible father or an awful husband in front of the children.  Eventually he feels enraged not only because of how she treats him, but how her behavior is harming the children.   At some point the man may throw something, punch a wall, or slam his fist down loudly to vent his anger and to communicate that he has reached his limits. Up till now she has never listened to what he had to say.  He decides that maybe she will stop if she can see just how angry he has become.  Rather than recognizing that he has reached his limits, expressing his anger physically has the opposite effect.  For a long time the man has tried to hide his anger.  Why should the woman believe he really means it?  After all, he has put up with her abuse for a long time and done nothing.  Instead of realizing that things have gotten out of control, the woman may approach him and say something like, “What are you gonna do.  Hit me?  Go ahead.  I’ll call the police and you’ll never see your children again.”  Once he expressed his anger physically, the situation became dangerous for him and for her.

The door to violence has opened wide. He should walk away. When he does walk away, she ends up more angry than ever, will scream obscenities at him and strike him repeatedly.  She may even strike him with an object.

Why Do Men Stay In Abusive And Violent Relationships?

Men stay in abusive and violent relationships for many different reasons.  The following is a brief list of the primary reasons.

  • Protecting Their Children.  Abused men are afraid to leave their children alone with an abusive woman.  They are afraid that if they leave they will never be allowed to see their children again.  The man is afraid the woman will tell his children he is a bad person or that he doesn’t love them.
  • Assuming Blame (Guilt Prone).  Many abused men believe it is their fault or feel they deserve the treatment they receive. They assume blame for events that other people would not.  They feel responsible and have an unrealistic belief that they can and should do something that will make things better.
  • Dependency (or Fear of Independence).  The abused man is mentally, emotionally or financially dependent on the abusive woman.  The idea of leaving the relationship creates significant feelings of depression or anxiety.  They are “addicted” to each other.

Who Can Help If You Are In An Abusive or Violent Relationship?

Help for men who are victims of domestic abuse and violence is not as prevalent as it is for women.  There are virtually no shelters, programs or advocacy groups for men.

Most abused men will have to rely on private counseling services.  Community resources for breaking the cycle of violence are scarce and not well developed.

National Domestic Abuse Hotline   1 (800) 799 – SAFE
National Child Abuse Hotline   1 (800) 4 – A – CHILD

Facts About Domestic Violence against Men

 

Must Read

Dating Violence At A Glance

Types of Family Violence

Violence against Women Impact on Society

http://domestic-violence.laws.com/domestic-violence-against-men

Need Help?

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence 

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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE MISUSE OFTEN ABUSES MEN

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE MISUSE OFTEN ABUSES MEN

More and more men are coming to Atlanta Anger Management with similar stories as below. Worth the read and reflection for those now involved in Couple Conflicts or involved with an unstable emotionally charged partner.

Please POST your comments and own experience as it will add greatly to this very needed discussion. Change in attitudes, laws, support groups, needs to happen so men have rights and justice too. Tell your story truthfully please. Thank you. – Director Richard Taylor of Atlanta Anger Management

False Allegations To Gain Advantage In Divorce

by Steve Cloer

At first I didn’t believe the stories were true. It wasn’t that I thought the stories I heard were lies or the people telling them were not being truthful, but the rational and logical areas of my mind wouldn’t let me believe them.

After all, this is America, synonymous with freedom, civil rights and justice. I discounted the stories as unusual situations or atypical. Then, I began to meet more people who told similar stories. I still could not rationally believe them. Their stories didn’t seem real. How could they be factual? Certainly something would have been done about it if any of these stories were true.

Because of the erratic behavior and problem drinking by my wife, I was warned many times to expect to become an actor, a victim in one of these stories. Still it was too unreasonable for me to imagine. Too farfetched to believe. I did not disbelieve the people who told me of their parts in these stories. However, reason would not allow me to believe the stories could be true.

It was a shock my beliefs could not recognize. “This is America,” I thought, “Millions of American men and women have sacrificed, some giving their lives to guarantee my freedom, rights and justice.” “You are innocent until proven guilty.” “Due process!” my beliefs echoed. The phrases of our freedom stuck in my mind, implanted continuously since childhood. I recalled the phrase “with liberty and justice for all.” I remembered saying that phrase thousands of time growing up, as all school children in America had each morning in their classrooms and many other places. As my son does now at each of his Boy Scout meetings. Certainly there is “liberty and justice for all” in America?

But my time had come.

I was coaching my son’s soccer team one Saturday when his mother came by the field and convinced him to leave with her after practice. While she was there waiting for the practice to end she was talking on her cell phone with a very serious, business like demeanor. I went on home alone, instead of going to eat at one of my son’s favorite places with him, as we usually did after soccer practice.

Shortly after I got home there was a knock at my door. I peered out the window and could see two sheriff’s deputies. My first thoughts were that someone had been hurt. Naively, with curiosity, I answered the door.

Their first words set my mind numb. After I heard the initial words “ Domestic Violence Complaint” I could only hear a few of the words they said, and they were mixed in the racing of my numb mind. They told me they were here to serve me.

It must be a mistake!

My thoughts raced, searching for the reasons, the source, the cause. There were none I could attribute to this ridiculous charge.

The deputy read on. I could still not hear his words. Life had immediately become a slow motion fog, the warnings of the stories I had heard rang in my head as the deputy read.

Some neighbors, seeing the sheriff’s car, had gathered across the street, watching and listening as the deputy talked loudly. When he finished he asked: “Do you understand this?” I had no idea what he had just said. I answered, “No. I hardly heard a word you said.” The deputy very loudly repeated:

  • “If you come near your residence you will be arrested.”
  • “You can have no contact with any of the members of your family, no phone calls, no letters, no emails, no notes sent through a third party, you can’t go to your children’s school to see them.”
  • “Violate any of this and you will be charged with a felony.”
  • “You have twenty minutes to pack some clothes.”

The sheriff went on, my mind went numb again, not hearing his words. I interrupted, “What is this about?” He answered, “Your wife has filed a family violence complaint against you.”

“For what?”, I asked. “You can read it in the complaint we’ll give you when you leave here,” was his answer.

The two sheriff deputies followed me throughout my house, inspecting my every move and examining each item I chose to take with me. After a short while one deputy hurried me along saying, “Finish up, we have several more places to go.” After I packed a few items they escorted me to my vehicle, took the keys to my house, workshop, and other vehicle, and, with the threat of arresting me if I returned, watched while I drove away.

For a moment I felt that I knew what it was like in 1940’s Europe, the authorities had come to my house with no evidence or proof of any wrong doing and forced me from my home and family without any pretense of a hearing or trial.

I drove to an all night restaurant and stopped in the parking lot, shaking, feeling like I was in a dream. My mind was engulfed in a mental fog, working in slow motion, churning with a thousand images running through it. I tried to read the complaint, but I had to read each word or sentence several times before my mind would concentrate enough to grasp the meaning.

The complaint was signed by Judge Gene Reeves, who I had never seen nor heard of before.

I sat in my car all night, staring out the window, unable to sleep, unable to stop the tears. I felt like a man without a country. I was instantly transformed into a homeless person with no access to my child, my belongings or my means of supporting myself. This was the first of many similar nights to follow.

As soon as I was able to concentrate on the complaint, I began to piece things together.

I remembered that ten days before my wife had pulled up into the driveway and came out to my shop where I was working. It was apparent to me that she had been drinking and she had our 7-year-old son with her as she commonly took the boy out with her driving while she was drinking! She was angry, as she frequently was when she indulged in her frequent drinking bouts.

I noticed her angry behavior and was expecting her to become physically violent, as she had many times before when she was drinking and angry. To protect myself, and save my son from observing more family conflict, I closed and locked the workshop door to prevent her entry. I was trying to avoid another one of her drunken verbal and physical attacks. Her primary statement in the complaint was that I pushed her during this incident.

Prudence and the law allow self-defense when assaulted, and leaving the conflict is strongly recommended. The law considers it child abuse when children are exposed to family violence.

Previous to this incident I had repeatedly endured verbal abuse from her when she was drinking, demands that I not associate with my friends, accusations when I wanted to leave the house, and she consistently tried to alienate our son from me.

She frequently became belligerent as a result of the alcoholic binges. That led to numerous incidents of her pushing, slapping, punching, kicking, and throwing things at me.

Despite her repeated abusive behavior I had never reported her. I found the idea of my son’s mother enduring the humiliation of being taken to jail repugnant. How could I allow my son to bear the effects of his mother being taken by the police?

From the stories I had heard from other men I felt no one would listen to me, a man, even if I made a report. If I did report her, and she was arrested, I knew she would likely seek revenge by telling my son how I had sent Mommy to jail. Her intentions were consistently to punish me by attempting to further alienate my son from me as she had already been actively doing. She had already successfully alienated my stepdaughter.

At home I had emails written by my wife to her friends describing how she had hit or kicked me, video tapes of her aggressive (a suggestion from the police), abusive, threatening physical behavior toward me. I had also kept phone contact information of people who had witnessed her abusing me, a police report filed when her mother called me on the phone and threatened to “blow me away.” But, conveniently for her, after she reported me I was not allowed into my house to retrieve these things before the court date. Even my being near my own house would result in an arrest and a felony conviction.

In the papers I was served there were several complaints other than the workshop incident, all fabrications. One such complaint was that “I held her arms,” neglecting to mention that the reason I “held her arms” was to keep her from continuing to hit me during several incidents where she had been drinking.

In my wife’s deposition, taken after the time these alleged incidents took place, there was naturally no mention of any of these drunken affrays. In fact, in the deposition my wife referred to me as “pretty perfect” when questioned about my behavior.

The compliant the sheriff served me with required that I be evaluated by a court-approved psychologist. I made an appointment, paid the fee, and attended the evaluation. I took written tests and underwent a verbal interview. The evaluation stated that there was no indication of a violent potential and that any further treatment or evaluation was not prescribed.

I went to court the first time in my life expecting serious consideration of the allegations to be examined by the judge. After all there is “justice for all” in America. A judge who cared about his duty and who stood for justice would expose the truth. The judge would have fairness, justice and the best interest of my son in mind. My thinking was that no responsible person would advocate a drunken woman becoming violent toward a father in front of the child, especially a person in such an esteemed position as a judge.

My wife had no proof or evidence of any kind to indicate that any violence took place. She had no police reports, no medical reports, no witnesses, no pictures of bruises or scrapes, nothing!

I attended the court hearing at Gwinnett Justice Center, 75 Langley Drive, Lawrenceville, Georgia 30045, telephone: (770) 822-8000, Case Number 00-A-08605-0, in front of Magistrate Judge Robert Mitchum. My lawyer advised me to play down anything that happened that would be considered violence because, no matter who was guilty, the man would be the one put out of the house.

I made a mistake. I told the truth instead.

During the hearing I was rushed through a busy court system. The judge commented “We have a lot of people here and I want to finish and get home in time for dinner.” The judge looked at me and told me, “Give me your Readers Digest condensed version of what happened.” The judge read my wife’s list of complaints. He didn’t ask me, “ Did you do this?” What is your side of the story?” “Do you dispute these allegations?” I started telling my side of the workshop incident. The judge started writing up the order before I had hardly begun my story. The Judge appeared to listen to everything my wife said and ignore anything I presented. The psychological evaluation was never brought up.

The judge told me, as he had told others that day, “It’s only for six months,” seemingly justifying his decision, as if getting thrown out of your house and work for six months was a minor inconvenience.

The judge took the usual course of “When in doubt, throw him out.” It appeared he never even considered that the woman might have been the aggressor. I was removed from my home where I made my living in my workshop and home office. I was forced to pay my abuser $500 a month and to make the $950 house payment. I was ordered to pay her credit card bill. I was not allowed near my house under threat of a felony conviction.

The 5 th and 14 th Amendments of the United States Constitution, which requires that no State shall “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, or deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the law,” was cast aside and ignored for both my son and myself.

My wife had lived in the same house with me for ten days after my “violent act” before she filed her complaint. She had several friends and relatives in the area but apparently didn’t feel terrified enough of me to flee to one of those places in that ten days.

Later, my son’s guardian ad litem (a court appointed person to investigate the children’s situation and recommend custody, typically a crony of the judge) stated in court and in a report that she found it strange that the complaint was filed ten days after the supposed incident. It was clear the guardian ad litem was very suspicious about the allegations. My wife’s lawyer invented the excuse that: “She couldn’t get a hold of me to find out what to do for those ten days.”

Days later I went to the court clerk’s office and looked through the case file. The judge had a paper in the file he was apparently using to take notes as my hearing took place. The notes were incorrect on several subjects; such as I prevented her from coming in the house (not the workshop). The paper was covered with doodles, indicative of the disinterest to find the facts the judge showed in my case and reflects the boredom and disinterest the judge had with the whole procedure.

Because I worked out of the workshop at my house I suffered a loss from several projects I was working on that I could not finish. That cost me thousands and damaged my company’s reputation. To pay everything the court ordered I would still have been $33 a month short after I paid my entire average monthly income. But I was barred from the shop where I derived that income.

Most importantly, my son was deprived of a very good and active father with whom he had a strong, close relationship. All this with no evidence whatsoever! I was able to see my son only because the guardian ad litem recommended 50/50 shared custody, one week with me and one week with the mother. This didn’t seem to indicate that I was a violent threat from the guardian ad litem’s perspective. However, for this to be allowed I had to secure an appropriate residence.

The cost of this residence was $1,400 a month, a one-room motel, for eight months on top of the $950 house payment and $500 support I was forced to make.

While I was out of the house, my wife pillaged my belongings, financial documents, business papers, and computer data. She took what she wanted including $7,200 from the company account. She removed my property from the house, slandered me to the neighbors and friends, and continued actively attempting to alienate my son from me.

The effect on my son was immediate. He had been on a soccer team for five seasons but quit playing because, according to comments his mother made to him: “It is too much trouble and it is too expensive.” In his second year with Boy Scouts he showed no progress with activities involving parents. He stopped doing the things he and I had enjoyed together that provided exercise; walking to school, riding bikes, hiking, soccer, and more. These physical activities were replaced by his mother with watching cartoons and playing Nintendo. My son immediately gained weight, which his young peers teased him about.

The year before, when he was in first grade and I was in the house, he was recommended for the gifted program. In the second grade, with me out of the house and unable to see him regularly, he was recommended for summer school for failing several subjects.

This situation didn’t have anything to do with the family violence associated with my wife’s drinking binges. It had to do with control. It had to do with the impending property settlement. It had to do with a future court hearing and judgment. It was the only way to get me out of the house that my wife hoped would become hers. The charge of domestic violence against me was nothing more than a way to place a face card in a hand that was yet to be played. This was a calculated move by a woman that was experiencing her third divorce, as well as being coached by her mother who had involved herself and assisted her three daughters in a total of seven divorces.

The divorce that followed effectively used the “Domestic Violence Conviction” to maximum advantage. The divorce and the results of it were even more devastating than the domestic violence case. In the divorce I was permanently forced from my home, prevented from seeing my son, and forced to pay my accuser, all with no evidence.

If someone came to anyone’s house with a gun and forced them from it, prevented them from seeing their children, and forced the occupants to pay the intruders money, this would be considered a crime of great brutality and abuse, exploitation, greed, vengeance, and a miscarriage of justice.

Since this happened to me I have met many men falsely accused of domestic violence. The number is surprising. The motivations for the accusations are the same; for the wife to gain control over the property and finances and to degrade the living standards and the emotional strength of the man to the point where he is at the mercy of the wife, her lawyer and the court.

I have seen men who were forced out of their house because of false accusations living in their cars, homeless, or accepting the favor of friends or of a church for a place to stay. These men have no money and are unable to see their children. Some of these men have committed suicide. Some have done worse.

I’ve learned that domestic violence accusations are widespread. I spent the better part of a day recently in the clerk’s office at the courthouse. There was a steady stream of women coming into the clerk’s office for domestic violence complaints. All were women. Not one man came in even though statistics show women initiate or participate in the violence in 50% of these incidents. The women were told to wait until 1:30 PM that day and then they could go to the magistrate judge’s court and he would look at their complaint. At 1:30 there were about eight women in the court waiting to have the magistrate look at their complaint. The judge came in and asked each what her problem was and filled out the complaint as the women told him their story.

He signed all of the complaints without further question or any proof whatsoever, like he was handing out Halloween candy.

I went back to the clerk’s office again and looked at the calendar for domestic violence hearings. I noticed hearings on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

When I’d had my hearing, about a year and a half before, they were only having them on Tuesdays. I asked why the extra days and she informed me that the cases have grown from about 20 per week to anywhere from 50 to 80 per week at present.

In my experience, domestic violence laws produce a misuse and abuse of the system by lawyers and unhappy spouses to gain power, increase financial gains, and attain vengeance.

Although men are commonly victims of domestic violence, the laws, attitudes, resources and actions dealing with family violence greatly favor women in a way detrimental to men.

Domestic violence laws are weapons of mass destruction in the divorce and custody wars. A woman can be assured of an ally in the judicial system to assist her in abusing a man. The judiciary has hardened their hearts against men, and fathers in particular.

The imbalance and injustice of the family violence laws and attitudes result in the continued degradation of the foundation of the American society, our families.

The day has come when the multitudinous cries of “wolf” dilutes the pleas of those few who are truly abused. Our society is already undermined by internal strife such as this between families and government. The misuse of family violence laws isn’t just an issue of one person, men in general, or noncustodial parents, this is an issue of the survival of our society.

Steve Cloer

Norcross, Georgia

Email: sacs1@mindspring.com

Source: http://www.ejfi.org/DV/dv-105.htm#false

_______________________________________________________________

Atlanta Anger Management do not offer services in Domestic Violence or Family Violence.

Atlanta Anger Management does offer Individual Sessions and Classes for Anger Management, Anger and Rage Issues, Custody Battles Issues, Divorce/Conflict In Couples, Improved Communication, Emotional Intelligence, Stress Management and Coaching For High Conflict Interpersonal Problems.

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence 

 

 

DeKalb County Raising Awareness Over Domestic Violence

DeKalb County Raising Awareness Over Domestic Violence

Friday, Oct. 18, 2013

DeKalb County leads state in domestic violence deaths

DEKALB COUNTY, GA. —

DeKalb County leads the state in the number of women murdered in domestic violence incidents. Now, county leaders are taking steps to raise awareness and help give victims a way out.

Tamiko Lowery said at first it was emotional abuse, then it turned physical by her husband of three years. She’s now an advocate against domestic violence.

“I remember him hitting me. I don’t remember anything else after that. The next thing I know, I was in the middle of Interstate 85 with cars swerving around me,” Lowery said. “When you’re raised in that environment and you see it, you just don’t know how to get help.”

The same is true for Sabrina McKenzie whose husband of 20 years abused her and it ran in her family.

“My sister was murdered by her husband. She was stabbed 22 times in front of her kids,” McKenzie said.

Both women are survivors. And both are sharing their story in an effort to help others. Especially in DeKalb County.

Domestic violence deaths have increased in DeKalb in recent years. Last year, the county had the highest number of deaths in the entire state, which is why solicitor Sherry Boston said her number one priority is to get that number down.

“To know that I am here serving in a county where traditionally we are at the top at the list for the state of Georgia, it means that I know I have to work extra hard to get the message out,” Boston said.

Boston’s office is collecting cell phones to give victims the opportunity to call for help. And they’re getting businesses to help them.

“It’s hard when you have to hide even those emotional scars,” Boston said. “But when you think you can potentially save someone else’s life…”

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The Solicitor’s Office is having a symposium that’s open to the public to talk about the issue.

It’s on Thursday, Oct. 24 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Manuel Maloof Auditorium in Decatur.

Source:
http://www.wsbtv.com/videos/news/dekalb-county-raising-awareness-over-domestic/vCGCt3/

GEORGIA FREES JAIL SPACE WITH ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES

GEORGIA FREES JAIL SPACE WITH ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES

Georgia Judges are ruling in favor of criminal defendants who enroll in anger  management classes prior to arraignment in simple battery, battery, simple assault, assault, disorderly conduct, affray, terroristic threats cases of non-political/security nature,  child custody cases, divorce, and some family violence cases.

This strategy is designed to convince the courts to show leniency in favor or defendants who are able to demonstrate that they acknowledge the need of anger management and are moving proactively to seek improvement.

Current overcrowding in jails are also a factor in avoiding jail sentences in favor of rehabilitation through Pre-Trial Diversion Programs use of anger management classes and criminal defense attorneys and family attorneys suggesting proactive attendance in anger management classes before appearing in court before the judge.

Each Georgia County has different requirements for number of hours or weeks of required anger management classes usually ranging from 8-12 hours/weeks in Georgia.

At Atlanta Anger Management we have seen courts require from 1 hour up to 32 hours of Anger Management Classes. In my humble opinion the minimum should be 4 hours of anger management for a case of injustice where the court/prosecuting attorney knows the defendant should not have been arrested. This would allow enough time for the participant to learn some emotional intelligence skills in anger management, communication, and stress management that aids in better choices in decision making at home, work and public life. Often requiring an Anger Assessment Evaluation might be called for in cases like these. These are used to determine if any anger management classes are needed.

In Georgia, most clients take 8-12 hours of classes in anger management to fulfill court requirements. A few we have worked with have been ordered longer time frames.

There still seems to be a few Georgia Courts that do not understand what anger management is as compared to regular psychotherapy counseling for anger.

Anger Management uses psycho-education in classes using an approved/certified program with workbook teaching concepts, principles, and coping strategies to alter the participants beliefs and subsequent behaviors with better choices for better outcomes. This reduces recidivism and increases public safety if the participant uses what is learned. More…

Traditional Counseling often does not teach coping strategies using education based learning to address anger/violence issues and therefore is not effective helping such individuals. According to the American Psychiatric Association, anger is a normal human emotion. It is not a mental disorder, consequently it is not responsive to traditional counseling, psychotherapy or psychotropic medication. Additionally anger is not listed in The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) DSM-IV-TR.

AA type talk anger management groups often do not teach these type skills either so are not effective in reducing recidivism. Anger Management in the movies/TV is for entertainment not actually how anger management actually works.

Atlanta Anger Management is Atlanta’s #1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson Provider offering a internationally/nationally recognized Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Curriculum with workbooks .

Atlanta Anger Management offer Anger Management Classes:

  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday to meet every court need.

Anger/Violence Assessment Evaluations are ordered for individuals the court determines may or may not need anger management classes. There are many Evaluations in use in Atlanta with the standard determined by the Certification Provider in most cases.

An accurate Assessment Evaluation can determine:

  • the proficiencies of the individual in the areas taught in anger management
  • family history of anger/violence
  • information regarding the actual incident that caused the arrest
  • communication style of participant
  • participant’s attitude in choices
  • empathy quotient
  • amount of stress
  • often impulse control

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT SERVICES

CERTIFIED IN 50 US STATES IN ANGER MANAGEMENT

ASSESSMENTS FOR ANGER MANAGEMENT
ATLANTA COURT ORDERED ANGER VIOLENCE ASSESSMENTS

COURT ORDERED ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES

ANGER MANAGEMENT MONDAY NOON CLASSES
ANGER MANAGEMENT TUESDAY 6:30PM CLASSES
ANGER MANAGEMENT WEDNESDAY 6:30PM CLASSES
ANGER MANAGEMENT THURSDAY 6:30PM CLASSES
ANGER MANAGEMENT FRIDAY NOON CLASSES
SATURDAY ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES

ACCELERATED ONE DAY ANGER MANAGEMENT COURSE

SCHEDULE OF ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES
TEEN ANGER HELP

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT CLASS IN ATLANTA
COUPLES CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
COUPLES COMMUNICATION CLASS
EXECUTIVE COACHING
VIP CONCIERGE ANGER MANAGEMENT COACHING SERVICES

RAGE MANAGEMENT – HELP
ROAD RAGE ANGER MANAGEMENT

ANGER MANAGEMENT BY TELEPHONE  Not Court Ordered.
WORKSHOPSONE DAY SATURDAY CLASSES – DISCOUNT RATES
COURT ORDERED ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES HOME
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR BUSINESS

ANGER MANAGEMENT SEMINARS ONSITE

STRESS MANAGEMENT HELP
STRESS MANAGEMENT SEMINARS ONSITE
SPEAKER ENGAGEMENTS

ABOUT
ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT BLOG

RESOURCES – BOOKS
LINKS

MARTA MEDICAL CENTER STATION WALKING DIRECTIONS
MARTA MEDICAL CENTER STATION WALKING DIRECTIONS PDF

VIDEO – 1 Minute About Anderson and Anderson™ Curriculum

 

CONTACT:

Richard Taylor BS, CAMF

Richard Taylor BS, CAMF

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam
About Me: http://about.me/richardtaylorAAM

#1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider In Atlanta
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – Domestic Violence Hotline 1.800.334.2836

People call stating they need 24 hours of classes.

I ask them to check their paperwork to see if it states they need Family Violence (Domestic Violence) or Anger Management. Most often it will state Family Violence (Domestic Violence). Most states require 24 (26) weeks or longer for Domestic Violence. Other Domestic Violence descriptors used are: Family Violence, Batter’s Program.

As a service to the community I site the  Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

If you are a victim of Domestic Violence be careful and get help. If you the one doing domestic violence get help before you go to jail. Domestic Violence is not right. Act. Do Something. Do not commit violence. Read below.

FIND A DOMESTIC FAMILY VIOLENCE CENTER NEAR YOU

http://gcadv.org/general-resources/domestic-violence-centers/

ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

The abuse you or someone you know is experiencing or have experienced is not your fault.  Our network of domestic violence programs is here to help people stay safe.

What Is Domestic Violence?

Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior or coercive control in any relationship that is used by one person to gain or maintain power and control over another.

Common Ways Abusers Gain or Maintain Power and Control

Often domestic violence can be subtle and can happen slowly in a relationship.  Anyone can be abused, and sometimes leaving can be very hard and dangerous due to the abuser’s actions.  Abusers gain or maintain power and control in many ways.  The more the abused person tries to pull away from the relationship, the more an abuser tries to gain and maintain power and control, often in more dangerous ways.  The following is a list of some ways in which someone abusing their partner people that abuse their partners try to gain and maintain power and control.

Domestic violence can be:

  • Emotional Abuse
    • calling their partner names like fat, ugly, stupid, crazy, sensitive or lazy
    • controlling their partner’s everyday life
    • blaming their partner when things go wrong
    • preventing their partner from talking to people that can help
    • humiliating their partner in public or when with friends and family
    • manipulating their partner
    • acting jealous and isolating their partner from friends and family
    • acting in ways that make their partner feel afraid
  • Psychological Abuse
    • brainwashing their partner or trying to make them confused about reality, “crazy-making”
    • secretly monitoring their partner through technology or other means so that the abuser seems to have omnipresence and know everything about their partner
    • forcing their partner to stay awake for long hours leading to chronic exhaustion
    • using religion or other belief system to promote or defend their abusive behavior
    • forcing children to engage in verbal or physical abuse of their partner
    • threatening to “out” their partner if they are gay or lesbian
    • threatening to have their partner deported if they are undocumented
    • switching from violent behavior to kind behavior in order to regain trust of their partner (and ultimately power and control over their partner)
  • Economic Abuse
    • controlling the family money
    • forcing their partner to give paychecks to the abuser
    • not allowing their partner to work, go to school or attend other activities that would promote economic independence
    • depriving their partner of money to pay for basic expenses, such as for personal hygiene items
    • trying to get their partner fired from work by calling repeatedly, showing up or starting conflict with their partner’s co-workers
    • taking away their partner’s passport, social security card, driver’s license or other documents so they are unable to establish independence, financial or otherwise
  • Sexual Abuse
    • causing their partner to be hurt during sex
    • forcing their partner to perform sexual acts
    • having affairs outside of the intimate relationship
    • forcing their partner to have sex for money
    • purposely infecting their partner with HIV/AIDS or a sexually transmitted illness (STI)
  • Physical Abuse
    • pinching, poking, slapping, biting, pushing, punching, strangling, burning or cutting their partner
    • forcing their partner to take drugs
    • hurting their partner’s pet
    • taking away their partner’s assistance devises, such as their TTY, glasses, medicine or ramp

This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt or injure someone.

Anyone can be abused, and the abuse is not the fault of the victim. Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of their class, religion, ethnic background, education, age, gender, disability status, sexual orientation, gender presentation, or immigration status.  Sometimes individuals being abused blame themselves for the abuse that is happening to them, but nothing that a person says or does justifies their partner’s use of violence.

Is It Abuse?

If you or someone you know is experiencing any of the abusive actions above, it could be a sign of domestic violence in the relationship.  Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behaviors that some individuals use to control others in their family or home, and it tends to get worse over time.   If a victim’s partner has ever threatened them, physically harmed them or otherwise made their partner afraid for their safety, taking action to leave, separate or divorce may put a victim in greater danger. Please call Georgia’s 24-Hour domestic violence hotline, 1.800.33.HAVEN (1.800.334.2836) V/TTY to talk to an advocate about how to plan for safety or how you can assist a friend that may be experiencing domestic violence.

Domestic Violence Is Hard and Dangerous To Escape

The abuser in a relationship can make it very difficult or dangerous for a victim to find safety or leave a relationship.  Some of the tactics used above are repeated or intensified when a victim leaves.  In fact, a victim’s risk of getting killed by an abuser greatly increases when they are in the process of leaving or have just left a relationship.  If you are thinking of leaving a relationship or know of someone who is thinking about or trying to leave a relationship, please share the 24-Hour Statewide Domestic Violence Hotline number with them, 1.800.33.HAVEN (1.800.334.2836) V/TTY. A domestic violence advocate will answer the phone and can offer some plans for safety and other resources.

Common Feelings People Have When They Are Being Abused

A person that is abused may feel confused, depressed, alone, scared, hopeless, angry, wired, humiliated, tired, anxious or numb.  An abused person may feel nothing at all or flooded with a lot of emotions.  Some people that are abused have physical symptoms, such as headaches, stomach aches, skin problems or pain throughout the body.  Domestic violence advocates understand that being in an abusive relationship is hard and that leaving can be dangerous.  When you feel the time is right, you can call 1.800.33.HAVEN (1.800.334.2836) V/TTY to talk to a domestic violence advocate about how you are feeling and what you need to stay safe.  You do not have to handle abuse alone.

 

FIND A DOMESTIC FAMILY VIOLENCE CENTER NEAR YOU

http://gcadv.org/general-resources/domestic-violence-centers/

ABOUT GCADV

Mission

The Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Inc. (GCADV) brings together member agencies, allied organizations and supportive individuals who are committed to ending domestic violence. Guided by the voices of survivors, we work to create social change by addressing the root causes of this violence. GCADV leads advocacy efforts for responsive public policy and fosters quality, comprehensive prevention and intervention services throughout the state.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2009-ED-S6-0034 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this website are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.
Other Resources:
Do search for Domestic Violence, erase your history of searches if in an abusive relationship.