5 Breathing Techniques For Weight Loss

Five Breathing Techniques For Weight Loss
(Anger Management & Stress Management)

Conscious Breathing
By Elizabeth Biscevic
eHow Contributor

When it comes to losing weight and boosting our metabolism, we tend to focus on fad diets and supplements rather than thinking about our breath. Surprisingly, the breath plays a major role in fat loss and metabolism.

Taking 15 minutes a day to just breathe a little deeper could help aid in weight loss.

Fat is made up of oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen. When oxygen makes its way to the fat molecules, it breaks them down into carbon dioxide and water. The blood filters out the carbon dioxide and gives it to the lungs to be exhaled.

Oxygen also thins the blood, which lowers your blood pressure and speeds up metabolism. That’s a pretty cool perk for something the body does on its own.

Add some conscious breathing to your daily routine with one of these five methods.

Method 1: Deep Breathing For Relaxation
1. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
2. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts.
3. Hold at the top of your inhale for six counts.
4. Exhale slowly for six counts.
5. Check your posture. Are you slouching with your exhale? If you’re slouching, readjust your position to ensure a straight spine and repeat steps 2 through 5.

Do this 10 times each evening or when you start to feel stressed or overwhelmed. You can do the exercise sitting up straight on hard chair or standing.

Method 2: Deep Breathing For Energy
1. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
2. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts. When you feel like your lungs are completely filled, take one more sip of air.
3. Hold your breath for eight counts. Work toward eventually holding it for 12 counts.
4. Exhale through the mouth for eight counts. Do not release all the air at once. Try pursing your lips to release air more slowly. When you feel like you have no more air in your lungs, exhale one breath more.
5. Hold your breath again for 8 counts, keeping your ribcage and abdomen tight and contracted. If you can’t hold your breath for eight counts without feeling overwhelmed, hold your breath for less time and try to work toward eight counts.

Repeat these steps 10 times in the morning and anytime during the day for a burst of energy. You can do this exercise sitting or standing.

Method 3: Alternate Nostril Breathing for Cleansing
1. Sit up straight and place your left hand comfortably on your left knee.
2. Place the tip of your right index finger and middle finger on the space between your eyebrows. Place your right thumb on your right nostril. Position your right ring finger near your left nostril.
3. Press your thumb down on your right nostril and exhale through the left nostril until there’s no more air in your lungs. Breathe in deeply through your left nostril.
4. Release the pressure on your right nostril, press down with your ring finger on your left nostril, and exhale through your right nostril until there’s no more air in your lungs.
5. Release the pressure on your left nostril, and breathe in through your right nostril.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5. In other words, alternate nostrils in/out.

Remain in a comfortable seat position and repeat this sequence five to seven times.

Method 4: The Breath of Fire For Metabolism
1. Sit up very straight and place your fists on your core center. This will encourage you to keep your core contracted.
2. Exhale all the air from your lungs.
3. Inhale slowly through the nose for six counts.
4. Purse your lips and make short, powerful exhalations. Do not inhale in between exhalations. The force of the exhalations will naturally bring air back into your lungs. Exhale 50 to 100 times, gradually increasing the number of exhales.
5. On the last exhale, force all of the air from your lungs and hold for one count.
6. Relax and breathe normally.

Do this sitting on your knees or in a comfortable seated very straight position.

Method 5: Vacuum Breathing For Toning the Core
1. Place your knees and hands on the ground. Animal Style.
2. Exhale all the air from your lungs while sucking your belly in.
3. Hold your breath and expand your lungs without an inhaling. Try to pull your stomach to your spine.
4. Hold this position for 10 seconds.
5. Release your breath slowly and repeat.

Do this for five minutes each day.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_5481782_deep-breathing-weight-loss.html

Above is the best how to I’ve seen. Nice. Do it. Try different ones to alleviate boredom.

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA
Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence
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Ralph Smart Anxiety Wisdom

Ralph Smart Anxiety Wisdom

ANXIETY

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CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Private Sessions – Help With Individual Problems – Issues

Private Sessions 

Help With Individual Problems – Issues

Definition: Meet with Director/Owner Richard Taylor In Private Meeting:

  • One on One (You and Me)
  • As Couple
  • As Family

For People Who Want To Work On:

  • Anger Issues (Anger Management)
  • Couple Conflict Issues
  • Couples Wanting To “Save” Their Relationships (Heterosexual, Lesbian, Gay)
  • Last Effort To Not Get Divorced
  • Improving Communication Skills
  • Stress Management
  • Building Emotion Skills (Emotional Intelligence)
  • Improve Golf Performance
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Road Rage
  • Rage Management
  • Impulse Control Issues
  • Lower Anxiety, Fear
  • Increase Empathy
  • Learn To Be Less Reactive
  • Build Soft Skills in Emotional Intelligence for Work
  • Build Soft Skills in Emotional Intelligence for Home
  • Executive Coaching
  • Court Ordered Anger Management Counseling/Coaching
  • Assertion Building Skills
  • Learning to Tone Down Aggressiveness
  • Become More Extroverted and Less Introverted
  • Become More Optimistic Less Pessimistic
  • Learn To Live A Fuller Live With Goals
  • Depression~Anger Battle – Beat It
  • Performance Enhancement
  • Laugh More
  • Become More Socially Aware -Improve People Skills
  • Be Less Vindictive, Wrathful
  • Be Less Jealous (Jealousy Issues)
  • Stop Lying
  • Control Rumination (Thinking Loop Control)
  • Mindfulness Development
  • Laughter Yoga Private Session

What To Do?

When ready call Richard Taylor at 678-576-1913 and set up appointment.

Define what You want to work on. Brief Presenting Issues. 

Length Of Sessions:

  • 60   Minutes | 1 Hour
  • 90   Minutes | 1.5 Hours
  • 120 Minutes | 2 Hours
  • 150 Minutes | 2.5 Hours
  • 180 Minutes | 3 Hours
  • 240 Minutes | 4 Hours
  • 360 Minutes | 6 hours
  • 480 Minutes | 8 Hours

When:

  • Monday Through Friday 10:00AM to 5:00PM  (Except Monday at Noon-1:30PM)
  • Monday Evenings 5:00PM to 10:00PM

With Whom:

Richard TaylorDirector/Owner Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
​Michele Weiner-Davis Divorce Busting Level I ​
Gottman Seven Principles Program Educator
Gottman Method Couple Therapy Level 1 Certificate of Completion
Certified ​MHS ​Bar-On Emotional Intelligence​ EQ-i 2.0 ​Provider
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Where:

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT 5555 Glenridge Connector, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30342

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT
5555 Glenridge Connector, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30342

FOCUS – A KEY TO SELF CONTROL

FOCUS – Is one of the keys to self control and improved Social Intelligence.

Richard Taylor of Atlanta Anger Management uses the Anderson and Anderson Contrasting Wheels of Behavior to help clients move quickly into more positive constructive relationship patterns.

Today we look at FOCUS or Paying Attention with Awareness.

Is your mind wandering?

The Practice

Pay attention.

Why?

Moment to moment, the flows of thoughts and feelings, sensations and desires, and conscious and unconscious processes sculpt your nervous system like water gradually carving furrows and eventually gullies on a hillside. Your brain is continually changing its structure. The only question is: Is it for better or worse?

In particular, because of what’s called “experience-dependent neuroplasticity,” whatever you hold in attention has a special power to change your brain. Attention is like a combination spotlight and vacuum cleaner: it illuminates what it rests upon and then sucks it into your brain – and your self.

Therefore, controlling your attention – becoming more able to place it where you want it and keep it there, and more able to pull it away from what’s bothersome or pointless (such as looping again and again through anxious preoccupations, mental grumbling, or self-criticism) – is the foundation of changing your brain, and thus your life, for the better.

As the great psychologist, William James, wrote over a century ago: “The education of attention would be the education par excellence.”

But to gain better control of attention – to become more mindful and more able to concentrate – we need to overcome a few challenges. In order to survive, our ancestors evolved to be stimulation-hungry and easily distracted, continually scanning their interior and their environment for opportunities and threats, carrots and sticks. There is also a natural range of temperament, from focused and cautious “turtles” to distractible and adventuresome “jackrabbits.” Upsetting experiences – especially traumatic ones – train the brain to be vigilant, with attention skittering from one thing to another. And modern culture makes us accustomed to an intense incoming fire hose of stimuli, so anything less – like the sensations of simply breathing – can feel unrewarding, boring, or frustrating.

To overcome these challenges, it’s useful to cultivate some neural factors of attention – in effect, getting your brain on your side to help you get a better grip on this spotlight/vacuum cleaner.

How?

You can use one or more of the seven factors below at the start of any deliberate focusing of attention – from keeping your head in a dull business meeting to contemplative practices such as meditation or prayer – and then let them move to the background as you shift into whatever the activity is.

You can also draw upon one or more during the activity if your attention is flagging. They are listed in an order that makes sense to me, but you can vary the sequence. (There’s more information about attention, mindfulness, concentration, and contemplative absorption inBuddha’s Brain.)

7 Things To Help Keep Focus:

1.  Set the intention to sustain your attention, to be mindful. You can do this both top-down, by giving yourself a gentle instruction to be attentive, and bottom-up, by opening to the sense in your body of what mindfulness feels like.

2.  Relax. Use Conscious Breathing. For example, take several exhalations that are twice as long as your inhalations. This stimulates the calming, centering parasympathetic nervous system and settles down the fight-or-flight stress-response sympathetic nervous system that jiggles the spotlight of attention this way and that, looking for carrots and sticks.

3.  Without straining at it, think of things that help you feel cared about – that you matter to someone, that you belong in a relationship or group, that you are seen and appreciated, or even cherished and loved. It’s OK if the relationship isn’t perfect, or that you bring to mind people from the past, or pets, or spiritual beings. You could also get a sense of your own goodwill for others, your own compassion, kindness, and love. Warming up the heart in this way helps you feel protected, and it brings a rewarding juiciness to the moment – which support #4 and #5 below.

4.  Think of things that help you feel safer, and thus more able to rest attention on your activities, rather than vigilantly scanning. Notice that you are likely in a relatively safe setting, with resources inside you to cope with whatever life brings. Let go of any unreasonable anxiety, any unnecessary guarding or bracing.

5.  Gently encourage some positive feelings, even mild or subtle ones. For example, think of something you feel glad about or grateful for; go-to’s for me include my kids, Yosemite, and just being alive. Open as you can to an underlying sense of well-being that may nonetheless contain some struggles or pain. The sense of pleasure or reward in positive emotions increases the neurotransmitter, dopamine, which closes a kind of gate in the neural substrates of working memory, thus keeping out any “barbarians,” any invasive distractions.

6.  Get a sense of the body as a whole, its many sensations appearing together each moment in the boundless space of awareness. This sense of things as a unified gestalt, perceived within a large and panoramic perspective, activates networks on the sides of the brain (especially the right – for right-handed people) that support sustained mindfulness. And it de-activates the networks along the midline of the brain that we use when we’re lost in thought.

7.  For 10-20-30 seconds in a row, stay with whatever positive experiences you’re having or lessons you’re learning. Since “neurons that fire together, wire together,” this savoring and registering helps weave the fruits of your attentive efforts into the fabric of your brain and your self. [You change.]

by

Rick Hanson, Ph.D.
25 Mitchell Blvd.
San Rafael, California 94903

Used With Permission

My latest book is adapted from this newsletter and is titled Just One Thing: Developing a Buddha Brain One Simple Practice at a Time. In the book, I present 52 of my favorite practices – simple actions inside your mind – to light up the neural networks of deep well-being and resilience.

Just One Thing: Developing A Buddha Brain One Simple Practice at a Time

by Rick Hanson by New Harbinger Publications
Paperback

List Price: $15.95
Our Price: $9.62

Buy Now

RICHARD TAYLOR’S FAVORITE BOOKS, DVDS ON: REWIRE YOUR BRAIN, MEDITATION, MINDFULNESS, PATHS TO SELF IMPROVEMENT, BRAIN SCIENCE, BRAIN NEUROPLASICITY

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & ANGER MANAGEMENT go hand in hand.
First Step: Self Awareness
Second Step: Self Control
Third Step: Social Intelligence & Awareness
Fourth Step: Relationship Management

FOCUS – Using Mindful Attention To What We Are Doing is key to rewire the brain
to become more (slower) responsive then caveman fight, flight, freeze instant reactivity.

My Suggestion:

1. Stop Multi-Tasking when you can.

2. Turn off TV and Radio when you can. Embrace silence.

3. Silence allows us to hear our inner brain (ego) chatter.

4. Catch Negative thoughts. Change them to Positive thoughts. Click -> Change the channel! Called: 3 C’s -> Catch It. Check It. Change It.

5. Linger 10-20-30 seconds on these positive thoughts or experiences to rewire the brain.

For Class Information
For Individual Private Session

For Saturday One Day Class

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

A Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence