How Insecurity Leads to Envy, Jealousy, and Shame

Envy, Jealousy, Insecurity, and Shame
have been coming up frequently in Private Sessions.

Good article to reflect on and implement it’s suggestions. – Richard Taylor

How Insecurity Leads to Envy, Jealousy, and Shame

Envy, jealousy, and shame are inextricably intertwined. Envy and jealousy are primal emotions that frequently overlap. They’re commonly first felt in the form of sibling rivalry and Oedipal longings. A child innately wants mommy and daddy all to him — or herself and feels “excluded” from the marital bond, especially if there have been parenting deficits that have led to shame and emotional abandonment.

Typically, young children of heterosexual parents see their same-sex parent as a rival for their opposite parent’s love. They feel both envious and jealous of their same-sex parent. Similarly, an interloper in a marriage may feel both jealous and envious toward the spouse he or she wishes to replace, possibly re-enacting childhood feelings toward his or her parents.

Children are frequently envious and jealous of the attention showered on a newborn sibling. Belief that a sibling is favored can create lifelong feelings of shame and inadequacy.

Envy

Envy is a feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to someone ‘s advantages, possessions, or traits such as beauty, success, or talent. It’s also a common defense to shame, when we feel less than another in some respect. When the defense is working, we’re not aware of feeling inadequate. We may even feel superior and disparage the person we envy. A malignant narcissist might go so far as to sabotage, misappropriate, or defame the envied person, all the while unconscious of feeling inferior. Arrogance and aggression serve as defenses along with envy. Generally, the degree of our devaluation or aggression is commensurate with the extent of underlying shame.

Bill was chronically resentful and envious of his brother’s financial success, but because of unconscious shame, he spent or gave away his money. He was on the road to homelessness to fulfill his father’s shaming curse that he was a failure and would end up on the street.

I may envy my friend Barbara’s new Mercedes, knowing I can’t afford it, and feel inferior to her. I might have the funds, but feel conflicted about buying it, because I feel undeserving of owning it. Or, I might emulate Barbara and take steps to acquire a Mercedes. However, if envy motivated me to copy her, and I ignored my values or true desires, I won’t derive any pleasure from my efforts. In contrast, I can think about my needs, desires, and how to fulfill them. I may be happy for Barbara, or my envy may be fleeting. I might realize that I have competing values or desires and that what suits her isn’t right for me. These are all healthy responses.

Jealousy

Jealousy also stems from feelings of inadequacy, though they are usually more conscious than with envy. However, whereas envy is the desire to possess what someone else has, jealousy is the fear of losing what we have. We feel vulnerable to losing the attention or feelings of someone close to us. It is defined as mental uneasiness due to suspicion or fear of rivalry or unfaithfulness and may include envy when our rival has aspects that we desire. By discouraging infidelity, jealousy historically has served to maintain the species, certainty of paternity, and the integrity of the family. But it can be a destructive force in relationships — even lethal. Jealousy is the leading cause of spousal homicides.

Margot’s deep-seated belief that she was inadequate and undeserving of love motivated her to seek male attention and at times intentionally act in ways to make her boyfriend jealous and more eager. Her insecurity also made her jealous. She imagined that he desired other women more than her, when that wasn’t the case. Her beliefs reflect toxic or internalized shame common among codependents. It’s caused by the emotional abandonment in childhood and leads to problems in intimate relationships. (See What is Emotional Abandonment.) Studies show that insecure individuals are more prone to jealousy.

Jill had healthy self-esteem. When her boyfriend lunches with his female friend and work colleagues, she isn’t jealous because she’s secure in their relationship and her own lovability. If he had an affair, she would have feelings about his betrayal of trust, but not necessarily jealously, because she doesn’t hold the belief that his behavior reflects a deficiency in her.

Shame

Whether we’re in the position of have or have-not, essentially, both envy and jealousy involve comparisons that reflect a feeling of insufficiency — “I’m inferior to X who has what I want,” or “I’m inferior to X who may diminish (or is diminishing) my importance to someone.” Feeling “not enough” is the common thread. Comparisons are a red flag for underlying shame. The greater is the intensity or chronicity of these feelings, the greater shame.

Thus, codependents take rejection hard, because of low self-esteem, toxic shame, and history of emotional abandonment. (See my post about breakups.) Typically, shame leads to attacking oneself or another. While some people blame themselves when rejected, others think, “He or she wasn’t really worthy of my love anyway.”

We may also behave in ways that drive our partner to leave, because it validates a belief that we’re unworthy of love. It may be a variation of “I’ll give you a reason to leave” or, “I’ll leave before I’m left.” Either way, it’s a defensive move to prevent getting too attached. It gives us a sense of control over the anticipated inevitable abandonment that would hurt even more. (See breaking the cycle of abandonment.)

Safety in Numbers

Envy and jealousy should be examined in the broader context of a relationship among the three actors — even if one is imaginary, such as in Margot’s case. Each person plays a role that serves a function. It’s more stable and less emotionally intense than a dyad.

A third person in a close relationship can mediate unresolved intimacy issues by siphoning off some of the couple’s intensity and help maintain the primary relationship. To do this, parents often “triangulate” a child into the role of identified problem child or surrogate spouse, which mediates problems in the marriage. The latter case foments Oedipal desires in the child that can cause dysfunction in later adult relationships.

A paramour can provide an ambivalent spouse a sense of independence that allows him or her to stay in the marital relationship. The spouse may feel torn between two loves, but at least he doesn’t feel trapped or that he or she is losing him or herself in the marriage. Intimacy lacking in the marriage can be made up for in the affair, but the marital problems don’t get addressed.

Once an affair is exposed, the homeostasis in the marriage is disrupted. Remorse doesn’t necessarily solve the underlying intimacy and autonomy problems. Sometimes, when jealousy subsides, new conflicts arise to recreate distance between the partners. When individual autonomy and intimacy are established within the couple, the relationship is stronger, and interest in the third person generally evaporates. If infidelity leads to divorce, frequently the removal of the rival spouse, who mediated the affair, gives rise to new conflicts in the once-illicit relationship that result in its eventual demise.

The unfaithful spouse’s continued contact with his or her ex may simultaneously dilute yet allow the relationship with the new partner to survive. The drama of it all also adds an element of excitement, that while stressful, alleviates depression typical of codependency.

Do’s and Don’ts

The best insurance against jealousy and envy are to increase your self-esteem. For jealousy, improve the intimacy in your relationship. If you’re suspicious of your mate, journal about any times in prior relationships (including same-sex and family relationships) when you were betrayed or rejected. If you’re still concerned, tell your partner the behavior that bothers you with an open mind in a non-accusatory manner. Share your feelings of insecurity, rather than judging him or her. Respect your partner’s privacy and freedom. Don’t try to control or cross-examine your partner, or sneak into his or her email or phone, which creates new problems and can make your partner distrust you.

This post was inspired by an insightful article:

Stenner, P. (2013). Foundation by Exclusion: Jealousy and Envy. In Bernhard Malkmus and Ian Cooper (Eds.), Dialectic and Paradox: configurations of the third in modernity. Oxford: Lang 53-79.

See also Buss, D.M. (2000). The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy Is as Necessary as Love and Sex. Free Press.

©Darlene Lancer 2015

Source: https://psychcentral.com/lib/envy-jealousy-and-shame/

Thank you Darlene Lancer.
_________________________________________

Richard L. Taylor Atlanta Anger Management

Owner/Director Richard L Taylor, BS CART, CAME
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist™
Certified Anger Management Expert™
ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT
5555 Glenridge Connector, Suite 200
Atlanta, GA 30342
Phone: 678-576-1913
Email: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

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Richard is Certified as a Certified Anger Resolution Therapist (CART) by Newton Hightower of The Center Of Anger Resolution, Inc. of Houston, TX. His model of Anger Management is accepted in all 50 US States.

Richard L Taylor, BS, CART, CAME
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Private Sessions – Help With Individual Problems – Issues

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Help With Individual Problems – Issues

Definition: Meet with Director/Owner Richard Taylor In Private Meeting:

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For People Who Want To Work On:

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Richard TaylorDirector/Owner Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist
​Michele Weiner-Davis Divorce Busting Level I ​
Gottman Seven Principles Program Educator
Gottman Method Couple Therapy Level 1 Certificate of Completion
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Where:

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

5555 GLENRIDGE CONNECTOR, ATLANTA, GA 30342

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT 5555 Glenridge Connector, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30342

ATLANTA ANGER MANAGEMENT
5555 Glenridge Connector, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30342

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST MEN

Domestic Violence Against Men

Revised: May 31, 2013

Statistics About Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men

Very little in known about the actual number of men who are in a domestic relationship in which they are abused or treated violently by women.  In 100 domestic violence situations approximately 40 cases involve violence by women against men.  An estimated 400,000 women per year are abused or treated violently in the United States by their spouse or intimate partner.  This means that roughly 300,000 to 400,000 men are treated violently by their wife or girl friend.

For more information see www.dvmen.org  |  http://www.ejfi.org/DV/dv.htm

Why Do We Know So Little About Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men?

There are many reasons why we don’t know more about domestic abuse and violence against men.  First of all, the incidence of domestic violence reported men appears to be so low that it is hard to get reliable estimates.  In addition, it has taken years of advocacy and support to encourage women to report domestic violence. Virtually nothing has been done to encourage men to report abuse.  The idea that men could be victims of domestic abuse and violence is so unthinkable that many men will not even attempt to report the situation.

The dynamic of domestic abuse and violence is also different between men and women.  The reasons, purposes and motivations are often very different between sexes.  Although the counseling and psychological community have responded to domestic abuse and violence against women, there has been very little investment in resources to address and understand the issues of domestic abuse and violence against men.

In most cases, the actual physical damage inflicted by men is so much greater than the actual physical harm inflected by women.  The impact of domestic violence is less apparent and less likely to come to the attention of others when men are abused.

For example, it is assumed than a man with a bruise or black eye was in a fight with another man or was injured on the job or playing contact sports.  Even when men do report domestic abuse and violence, most people are so astonished men usually end up feeling like nobody believes them.

The Problem With Assumptions About Domestic Abuse And Violence

It is a widely held assumption that women are always the victims and men are always the perpetrators.   Between 50 and 60% of all domestic abuse and violence is against women.   There are many reasons why people assume men are never victims and why women often ignore the possibility.  For one thing, domestic abuse and violence has been minimized, justified and ignored for a very long time.   Women are now more organized, supportive and outspoken about the epidemic of domestic abuse and violence against women.  Very little attention has been paid to the issue of domestic abuse and violence against men – especially  because violence against women has been so obvious and was ignored for so long.

What Is Domestic Abuse And Violence Against Men?

There are no absolute rules for understanding the emotional differences between men and women. There are principles and dynamics that allow interpretation of individual situations.

Domestic abuse and violence against men and women have some similarities and difference.

For men or women, domestic violence includes:

  • pushing
  • slapping
  • hitting
  • throwing objects
  • forcing or slamming a door
  • striking the other person with an object
  • using a weapon
  • can also be mental or emotional.

 

However, what will hurt a man mentally and emotionally, can in some cases be very different from what hurts a woman.  For some men, being called a coward, impotent or a failure can have a very different psychological impact than it would on a women.  Unkind and cruel words hurt, but they can hurt in different ways and linger in different ways.  In most cases, men are more deeply affected by emotional abuse than physical abuse.

For example, the ability to tolerate and “brush off” a physical assault by women in front of other men can in some cases reassure a man that he is strong and communicate to other men that he can live up to the code of never hitting a woman.

A significant number of of men are overly sensitive to emotional and psychological abuse.  In some cases, humiliating a man emotionally in front of other men can be more devastating than physical abuse.  Some professionals have observed that mental and emotional abuse can be an area where women are often more “brutal” than men.  Men on the other hand are quicker to resort to physical abuse and they are more capable of physical assaults that are more brutal – even deadly!.

Why Does Domestic Abuse Against Men Go Unrecognized?

Domestic violence against men goes unrecognized for the following reasons:

  • The incidence of domestic violence against men appears to be so low that it is hard to get reliable estimates.
  • It has taken years of advocacy and support to encourage women to report domestic violence. Virtually nothing has been done to encourage men to report abuse.
  • The idea that men could be victims of domestic abuse and violence is so unthinkable to most people that many men will not even attempt to report the situation.
  • The counseling and psychological community have responded to domestic abuse and violence against women. Not enough has been done to stop abuse against women.  There has been very little investment in resources to address the issues of domestic abuse and violence against men.
  • In most cases, the actual physical damage inflicted by men is so much greater than the actual physical harm inflected by women.  The impact of domestic violence is less apparent and less likely to come to the attention of others.
  • Even when men do report domestic abuse and violence, most people are so astonished, men usually end up feeling like nobody would believe them.  It is widely assumed than a man with a bruise or black eye was in a fight with another man or was injured on the job or while playing contact sports.  Women generally don’t do those things.

What Are The Characteristics Of Women Who Are Abusive And Violent?

The characteristics of men or women who are abusive fall into three categories.

  • Alcohol Abuse.  Alcohol abuse is a major cause and trigger in domestic violence.  People who are intoxicated have less impulse control, are easily frustrated, have greater misunderstandings and are generally prone to resort to violence as a solution to problems. Women who abuse men are frequently alcoholics.
  • Psychological Disorders.  There are certain psychological problems, primarily personality disorders,  in which women are characteristically abusive and violent toward men.   Borderline personality disorder is a diagnosis that is found almost exclusively with women.  Approximately 1 to 2 percent of all women have a Borderline Personality disorder.  At least 50% of all domestic abuse and violence against men is associated with woman who have a Borderline Personality disorder. The disorder is also associated with suicidal behavior, severe mood swings, lying, sexual problems and alcohol abuse.
  • Unrealistic expectations, assumptions and conclusions.   Women who are abusive toward men usually have unrealistic expectations and make unrealistic demands of men.  These women will typically experience repeated episodes of depression, anxiety, frustration and irritability which they attribute to a man’s behavior.  In fact, their mental and emotional state is the result of their own insecurities, emotional problems, trauma during childhood or even withdrawal from alcohol.   They blame men rather than admit their problems, take responsibility for how they live their lives or do something about how they make themselves miserable.  They refuse to enter treatment and may even insist the man needs treatment.   Instead of helping themselves, they  blame a man for how they feel and believe that a man should do something to make them feel better. They will often medicate their emotions with alcohol.  When men can’t make them feel better, these women become frustrated and assume that men are doing this on purpose.

A Common Dynamic:  How Violence ERUPTS

There are a number of commonly reported interactions in which violence against men erupts.

Here is one example that illustrates a common dynamic.

The woman is mildly distressed and upset. The man notices her distress and then worries she may become angry.   The woman attempts to communicate and discuss her feelings.  She wants to talk, feel supported and feel less alone.   She initially attributes some of her distress or problems to him.  The man begins to feel defensive, shuts down emotionally and attempts to deal with the problems rationally.  He feels a fight is coming on.  The woman feels uncared for, ignored and then gets angry.  She wants him to share the problem and he doesn’t feel he has a problem.  The man will attempt to remain unemotional and stay in control of himself.  He avoids accepting any blame for how she feels.  He is also worried that she may explode at any moment and that she will certainly do so if he talks about his feelings. The man will start talking about her problem as if she could feel better if she would only listen to him and stop acting so upset.  He fails to understand how she feels and tries to remain calm.  He tells her to calm down and ends up looking insensitive.  She begins to wonder if he has any feelings at all.  She tells him that he thinks he’s perfect.   He says he is not perfect.  She calls him insensitive.  He stares at her and says nothing but looks irritated.

The woman is frustrated that he won’t reveal his feelings and that he acts like he is in control.  On the other hand, the man feels out of control and like there is no room for anybody’s feelings in the conversation but hers. Communication breaks down and the woman begins to insult the man.  When the man finally expresses his disapproval and attempts to end the fight.  The woman becomes enraged and may throw something.  The man will usually endure insults and interactions like this for weeks or months.  This whole pattern becomes a recurrent and all too familiar experience.   The man becomes increasingly sensitive to how the woman acts and becomes avoidant and unsupportive.  The man begins to believe that there is nothing he can do and that it may be all his fault.  His frustration and anger can build for months like this.

This risk of violence  increases when the woman insults the man in front of their children, threatens the man’s relationship with his children, or she refuses to control her abusive behavior when the children are present.  She may call him a terrible father or an awful husband in front of the children.  Eventually he feels enraged not only because of how she treats him, but how her behavior is harming the children.   At some point the man may throw something, punch a wall, or slam his fist down loudly to vent his anger and to communicate that he has reached his limits. Up till now she has never listened to what he had to say.  He decides that maybe she will stop if she can see just how angry he has become.  Rather than recognizing that he has reached his limits, expressing his anger physically has the opposite effect.  For a long time the man has tried to hide his anger.  Why should the woman believe he really means it?  After all, he has put up with her abuse for a long time and done nothing.  Instead of realizing that things have gotten out of control, the woman may approach him and say something like, “What are you gonna do.  Hit me?  Go ahead.  I’ll call the police and you’ll never see your children again.”  Once he expressed his anger physically, the situation became dangerous for him and for her.

The door to violence has opened wide. He should walk away. When he does walk away, she ends up more angry than ever, will scream obscenities at him and strike him repeatedly.  She may even strike him with an object.

Why Do Men Stay In Abusive And Violent Relationships?

Men stay in abusive and violent relationships for many different reasons.  The following is a brief list of the primary reasons.

  • Protecting Their Children.  Abused men are afraid to leave their children alone with an abusive woman.  They are afraid that if they leave they will never be allowed to see their children again.  The man is afraid the woman will tell his children he is a bad person or that he doesn’t love them.
  • Assuming Blame (Guilt Prone).  Many abused men believe it is their fault or feel they deserve the treatment they receive. They assume blame for events that other people would not.  They feel responsible and have an unrealistic belief that they can and should do something that will make things better.
  • Dependency (or Fear of Independence).  The abused man is mentally, emotionally or financially dependent on the abusive woman.  The idea of leaving the relationship creates significant feelings of depression or anxiety.  They are “addicted” to each other.

Who Can Help If You Are In An Abusive or Violent Relationship?

Help for men who are victims of domestic abuse and violence is not as prevalent as it is for women.  There are virtually no shelters, programs or advocacy groups for men.

Most abused men will have to rely on private counseling services.  Community resources for breaking the cycle of violence are scarce and not well developed.

National Domestic Abuse Hotline   1 (800) 799 – SAFE
National Child Abuse Hotline   1 (800) 4 – A – CHILD

Facts About Domestic Violence against Men

 

Must Read

Dating Violence At A Glance

Types of Family Violence

Violence against Women Impact on Society

http://domestic-violence.laws.com/domestic-violence-against-men

Need Help?

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence 

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENT HELPS IMPULSE CONTROL

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE FOR IMPULSE CONTROL IS GAINING POPULARITY IN GEORGIA

Emotional Intelligence for “impulse control” is booming in California and New York.

In Georgia, awareness of Emotional Intelligence is waking up and is being used to help separate yourself from others in job interviews and for the employer to screen applicants from a wide choice of great candidates.

The key to this trend is the power of Emotional Intelligence Assessments in identifying low levels of competence in a number of skills (15 competencies in all) that are important in successful impersonal relationships and greater performance in life. Documentation shows it improves annual salaries and school performance in any Emotional Intelligence book.

EQ-i 2.0 Scales

EQ-i 2.0 Scales

An increase in self-referrals for skill enhancement coaching for “impulse control” is happening. Satisfied clients are referring friends and colleagues.  EQ coaching is becoming more popular with college students and young professionals wanting to improve themselves, wanting a better “edge” in the job market.

COACHING BY RICHARD L. TAYLOR
The key is to actually invest in the coaching component using the 21 page EQ-i 2.0 Assessment Report for the basis of SMART GOAL enhancement. Your Report is awesome, however, just like at the gym you need someone to hold you accountable and keep doing the improving work. It also makes it personal to your individual situation and problems.

Without coaching a person soon return to old habits that do not enhance their lives.

EXAMPLE REPORT

Call or e-mail Director Richard Taylor of Atlanta Anger Management to set up a Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Emotional Intelligence Assessment today.

→ EQ-i 2.0 Pre-Assessment Only $150.00 USD

EQ-i 2.0 Pre-Assessment and One Hour Debrief $300.00

EQ-i 2.0 Pre-Assessment, 1 Hour Debrief and Two – 30 Minute Phone/Skype/Tango Consults $450.00

Add EQ-i 2.0 Post Assessment $100.00 USD

EQ-i 2.0 Pre and Post Assessment $250.00 USD

Customized Plans To Fit Your Needs and Budget. Call Richard at 678.576.1913

Spouses, parents, significant others. career coaches, and employers are encouraging their family members and employees to take advantage of the opportunity to increase their skills in self-awareness, self-control, social awareness, empathy, and relationship management.

Emotional Intelligence has been shown to be a better predictor of success in life, marriage, work and school than IQ. Even Monster.com is advocating for the volunteer completion of Emotional Intelligence Assessments on the part of job applicants seeking positions in sales, customer service and leadership positions.

Coaching for skill enhancement in all emotional intelligence EQ-i 2.0 15 scales actually works. Motivated clients willing to complete an average of six months of coaching that include a Pre and Post Test can improve their ability to manage stress, anger and the 15 competencies.

EQ-i 2.0 Emotional Intelligence Model

EQ-i 2.0 Emotional Intelligence Model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Case Example:

Let’s take a look at the results of coaching for this 21 year old  young man who had everything but positive emotional intelligence skills.  He was mandated by a court to take eight (8) classes of Anger Management after being arrested for punching a hotel casino manager in the face.  He took the Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Emotional Intelligence Assessment before he started his Anger Management program.  Once he received his results and saw how accurate they are, he decided to volunteer for Emotional Intelligence Coaching after he completed his required eight sessions of Anger Management.    He saw us once per week for five months.

We can conduct the Assessment anywhere in the world since it is an Online Assessment with 133 questions to answer. It takes 13-20 minutes to complete. The coaching can be done in person in Atlanta, GA or over phone or Skype.

His Pre Assessment & Test Scores on the Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Assessment:

PreAssessmentEQ-i2.0_a

His Post Assessment & Test Scores on the Bar On EQ-i 2.0 Assessment:

PostAssessmentEQ-i2.0_bCall or e-mail Director Richard Taylor of Atlanta Anger Management to set up a Bar-On MHS EQ-i 2.0 Emotional Intelligence Assessment today.

Customized Plans To Fit Your Needs and Budget. Call  Richard at 678.576.1913

PS: Often we take the time to address each of the 15 Scales so the length of coaching can be determined by how much time that takes.

Read more:

http://atlantaangermanagement.com/anger-management-assessments-for-business.htm

https://atlantaangermanagement.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-bar-on-eq-i-2-0-emotional-intelligence-assessments-available-at-atlanta-anger-management/

CONTACT

Emotional Intelligence

Director Richard Taylor BS, CART, CAME
Certified Anger Resolution Therapist™
Certified Anger Management Expert™
Certified MHS EQ-i 2.0 Provider

EQI2.0_CertifiedLogoLge-RT-300x132

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Be Kind

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

Atlanta #1 Certified Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

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