EXTREME ROAD RAGE CBS46 REPORT

Road Rage: Misunderstandings turn dangerous with weapons involved

Posted: Nov 04, 2015 2:18 PM EST Updated: Nov 04, 2015 6:06 PM EST

ATLANTA (CBS46) –

With drivers in Atlanta ranked as some of the most discourteous on the road, commutes can turn into disputes.

When weapons are involved, a misunderstanding on the roadway can turn dangerous, and in the Atlanta area’s traffic, we’ve seen it happen all too often.

“Do you want to go home tonight?”

Richard Taylor with Atlanta Anger Management is an expert on rage.

“Is it worth it to get engaged with a driver who you don’t know has a gun or not?” Taylor said. “Do you want to eat tonight? Do you want to go home tonight? That becomes the question.”

Taylor said as we’re driving around the seemingly never-ending cluster of cars Atlanta is famous for incidents that drivers don’t like happen every day.

Some of those drivers come to see Taylor in his office daily and he sees news reports of angry people on the roads.

“They snap,” he said. “They’re losing their conscious ability to be reasonable and they just focus on the one person… That’s the big debate we have in the nation is over access to guns.”

Taylor said stress and anger play major roles in the road rage situation, but if you add a weapon into the mix and it can become a criminal case.

Incidents all too common

A witness to a road rage in Coweta County said, from what she saw, a suspect who pointed a gun at a car used the weapon as a first instinct.

CBS46 News

“Pulling a firearm, in just about every case, should be an absolute last resort and it seems like it was this guy’s first resort” the witness said.

In another incident, a baby was shot in the foot in what police determined was a dispute on the road in DeKalb County.

In the case of the aforementioned Corvette driver, she reportedly gestured to the car behind her to go around, and the driver of the Mustang opened fire.

So what can you to avoid road rage situations? Professionals suggest NOT flashing your lights and avoiding any sort of reaction to other drivers, including hand gestures.

Getting out of your car should never be an option, experts say.

If you’re prone to getting angry, officials say it’s best not to carry your gun in the car.

Copyright 2015 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Atlanta Is Rated The 2nd Least Courteous Drivers In US

AutoVantage Survey on Road Rage Identifies Atlanta as 2nd Least Courteous City in the US

Stamford, CT- May 12, 2014- When it comes to getting to and from work, a recent survey says Atlantans have it worse than citizens in just about any other city.

The 2014 In the Driver’s Seat Road Rage Survey identified Atlanta as having the second least courteous drivers across America’s largest cities. This represents an “increase” of two spots from the same survey in 2009.

Rankings were determined by measuring a wide array of driving actions that inhabitants admit to performing and acknowledge seeing, along with observations of their reactions to other drivers.

When compared to drivers in other cities,

Survey Participants in Atlanta are:

  • Most likely to admit purposely bumping another driver in reaction to perceived poor driving
  • Most likely to see another driver speeding
  • Most Likely to acknowledge tailgating someone else
  • 2nd most likely to see other drivers eating or drinking while behind the wheel

While drivers in Atlanta were identified as among the least courteous, Portland, OR was identified as having the most courteous drivers.

The survey’s best and worst cities were:

Least Courteous
2014 2009
Houston New York City
Atlanta Dallas
Baltimore Detroit
Washington DC Atlanta
Boston Minneapolis
Most Courteous
2014 2009
Portland Portland
Pittsburgh Cleveland
St. Louis Baltimore
San Francisco Sacramento
Charlotte Pittsburgh

“AutoVantage aims to provide peace-of-mind for our members, with world class technology that ensures rapid assistance in our customers’ time of need,” said Rob DiPietro, GVP of Product Services for AutoVantage. “The survey prepares our members for the things that they may encounter when driving in a new city.”

The In the Driver’s Seat Road Rage Survey, commissioned by AutoVantage, the complete car and roadside assistance service, measured behavior, observations and attitudes related to “road rage” as reported in America’s 25 largest cities, and provides an update to previous research completed in 2009.

Other cities surveyed in 2014 include Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York City, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, Seattle and Tampa Bay.

Observations for each city can be found at www.autovantage.com/roadrage.html

__________________________________________________________

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines
#roadrage as when a driver “commits moving traffic offenses so as to endanger other persons or property; an assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger of one motor vehicle on the operator or passengers of another motor vehicle”.

The NHTSA makes a clear distinction between road rage and aggressive driving, where road rage is a criminal charge and aggressive driving is a traffic offense. This definition places the blame on the driver.

Road Rage Behavior Among Drivers In U.S. 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

Atlanta Anger Management offers help for:

  • Road Rage
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Stress Management
  • Anger Management
  • Rage Management
  • Assertive Communication Skill Enhancement
  • Learning Self Control Of Emotions
  • Safe Driving


CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam
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About.Me www.about.me/richardtaylorAAM

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

CNN Special Report On #Being13

http://www.cnn.com/specials/us/being13

Watch a CNN Special Report, “#Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens,” Monday at 9 p.m. ET on CNN. Warning: This story contains explicit language.

Anderson Cooper and team did a great job on #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens. Social Media addiction applies to adults as well. Worth viewing the re-play on Cable or On Demand services. – Richard Taylor

(CNN)”I would rather not eat for a week than get my phone taken away. It’s really bad,” said Gia, a13-year-old. “I literally feel like I’m going to die.”

“When I get my phone taken away, I feel kind of naked,” said Kyla, another 13-year-old. “I do feel kind of empty without my phone.”

Both participated in “#Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens,” a first-of-its-kind CNN study on social media and teens.

More than 200 eighth graders from across the country allowed their social media feeds to be studied by child development experts who partnered with CNN. This is the first large scale study to analyze what kids actually say to each other on social media and why it matters so deeply to them.

“We see a lot of evidence of, if not out-right addiction to social media, a heavy dependence on it,” said sociologist Robert Faris, a school bullying and youth aggression researcher who co-authored the study. “There’s a lot of anxiety about what’s going on online, when they’re not actually online, so that leads to compulsive checking.”

Read the study: (Warning: Explicit language)

Why are teens so anxious about what’s happening online? #Being13 found that it’s largely due to a need to monitor their own popularity status, and defend themselves against those who challenge it.

61% of teens said they wanted to see if their online posts are getting likes and comments.
36% of teens said they wanted to see if their friends are doing things without them.
21% of teens said they wanted to make sure no one was saying mean things about them.

“This is an age group that has a lot of anxiety about how they fit in, what they rank, what their peer-status is. There is fear in putting yourself out there on social media and they hope for lots of likes and comments and affirmations but there is always the chance that someone could say something mean,” said child clinical psychologist Marion Underwood, the study’s other co-author.

The perils of lurking on social media

The study was conducted with eighth graders at eight different schools in six states across the country. Participating students, with the permission of their parents, registered their Instagram, Twitter and Facebook accounts through a secure server created by Smarsh, an electronic archiving company contracted by CNN. The study’s co-authors, along with their teams, analyzed an estimated 150,000 social media posts collected over a six month period. In addition, the teens also answered a number of survey questions about their use of social media.

‘If they’re talking about me, I’m going to talk about them’

The more teens look at social media, the study found, the more distressed they can become. The heaviest social media users admitted to checking their social media feeds more than 100 times a day, sometimes even during school hours. What’s more, some teens are so vigilant about those who might be casting them in a negative light, they follow the social media accounts of not only their friends, but also their enemies.

“I want to see what they’re talking about and if they’re talking about me. Because if they’re talking about me, I’m going to talk about them,” said Zack, one of this study’s teen subjects.

#Being13 also found that teens no longer see a distinction between their lives in the real world versus the online world. But they’ll still post online what they admit they’d never say in person.

“Go die. Stop trying to be popular. Holy s**t your (sic) ugly,” read one social media post sent to a girl in the study.

“On a serious level you are f**k bouta (sic) get your ass kicked,” read a post written by a boy in the study.

“Goddamn u dirty bitch u dirty bitch u dirty bitch,” read a post by another boy.

The level of profanity, explicit sexual language and references to drug use surprised the experts, considering the study’s subjects were only in eighth grade.

“I didn’t realize these kinds of behaviors trickled down. You see this at the high school level but these are kids, who I think of as children, and we saw a lot of adult content on these platforms,” Faris said.

Parents: Here’s how to stop the worst of social media

‘They’re sharing this stuff that was supposed to be kept private’

The adult content went far beyond the use of language. #Being13 found that even 13-year-olds are exposed to the sexualized side of the Internet. Fifteen percent of teens in this study reported receiving inappropriate photos, and those that did were nearly 50% more distressed than the rest of the students in this study.

“Receiving these pictures is upsetting, especially at such a young age, because it’s something you didn’t ask to see, it’s something you may have wished you did not open, but you can’t erase it out of your mind,” Underwood said. “It’s illegal, it’s worrisome, it’s scary, it’s dangerous, it’s loaded. If you tell an adult, everybody will get in a lot of trouble. So I think it puts them in a really tough position.”

In addition to receiving inappropriate photos, some teens in this study spoke about the prevalence of so-called revenge porn.

“What they like to call it is ‘exposing.’ It’s either, like, an ex-girlfriend or an ex-boyfriend, the majority of the time, and what they do is post … naked pictures of the person,” said Morgan, an eighth grade girl in this study. “They’re sharing this stuff that was supposed to be kept private between the two, and really shouldn’t have happened in the first place, but it did, and now they’re spreading it.”

Underwood explained that a break-up at age 13 can already be overwhelming, but to combine those feelings with this new, and malicious, form of payback can simply be devastating.

“To have the additional fear that incriminating pictures, that intimate pictures, are out there for others to see just adds to the shame and humiliation,” she said. “When they are hurt, when they are furious … unfortunately that’s just perfect ammunition.”

Parents ‘effectively erased the negative effects’

#Being13 also studied parents of the participating teens. Almost all parents — 94% — underestimated the amount of fighting happening over social media. Despite that finding, parents that tried to keep a close eye on their child’s social media accounts had a profound effect on their child’s psychological well-being.

“Parent monitoring effectively erased the negative effects of online conflicts,” Faris said.

Beyond discovering a number of posts and trends that parents might find alarming, #Being13 also found that social media can have plenty of benefits for 13-year-olds.

“It’s a way for them to connect with friends. It’s a way for them to see what people are doing. It’s a way for them to feel affirmed, supported, lifted up,” Underwood said. “Young people use social media to exercise positive leadership all the time.”

She cautioned though, “there is the occasional hurtful comment, the occasional painful period, experience of exclusion that looms large for most of them.”

Anderson Cooper on the new documentary

#Being13
anderson cooper reporters notebook being 13 ac_00023108

Anderson Cooper on the new documentary #Being13 02:32

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/05/health/being-13-teens-social-media-study/index.html

 

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
Atlanta, Georgia USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence