Stress Affects Your Health, Mind and Body

Stress Affects Your Health, Mind and Body

Stress can be highly personal, with one person’s unpleasant experience and another person’s who is unaffected by the experience. About 70 percent of doctor visits and 80 percent of serious illnesses may be exacerbated or linked to stress.

Stress Management long term fixes:

  • Exercise – 30″ Day / 5 Days
  • Yoga
  • Meditation – Daily
  • Conscious Breathing – Daily
  • Mindfulness
  • Progressive Relaxation – Daily
  • Journaling – Daily
  • Guided Meditation- Daily
  • Visualization
  • Biofeedback
  • Tai Chi
  • Qiqong
  • Tae Bo
  • Boxing
  • Short Term Fixes
  • More…

 

Stress Can Affect Your Health and Body in 23 Ways:

 

1. Fight or flight 50-60 times a day. The adrenals output hormones, such as cortisol & adrenaline that raises blood pressure and blood sugar. Not needed in most cases today. Over time it can be harmful to health.

2. Cravings Studies have linked cortisol to cravings for sugar and fat. Eat healthy meals/snacks when an attack of emotional eating occurs.

3. Fat storage “You can clearly correlate stress to weight gain,” says Philip Hagen, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The stress hormone cortisol may increase the amount of fat tissue your body hangs onto and enlarge the size of fat cells. Higher levels of cortisol have been linked to more abdominal belly fat.

4. Heart A recent study of 200,000 employees in Europe found that people who have stressful jobs and little decision-making power at work are 23% more likely to have a first heart attack than people with less job-related stress. Lead a heart-healthy lifestyle and focus on reducing stress in your life.

5. Insomnia Stress can cause hyper-arousal, a biological state in which people just don’t feel sleepy. See our Insomnia Blogs.

6. Headaches “Fight or flight” chemicals like adrenaline (epinephrine) and cortisol can cause tension headaches or migraines, either during the stress or in the “let-down” period afterwards. Stress also makes your muscles tense, which can make the pain of a migraine worse.

7. Memory Too much of the stress hormone cortisol can interfere with the brain’s ability to form new memories. During acute stress, the hormone also interferes with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that brain cells use to communicate with each other. That can make it hard to think straight or retrieve memories. A meditation practice should be implemented.

8. Hair Severe stress may even harm your hair. While the research is mixed, stress is thought to play a role in triggering hair loss in the autoimmune condition called alopecia areata. Stress and anxiety can also contribute to a disorder medically known as trichotillomania, in which people have a hard-to-resist urge to pull out the hair from their own scalp.

9. Pregnancy – Remain Calm. Stress may affect the ability to get pregnant. One study found that women with the highest levels of a stress-related substance called alpha-amylase were about 12% less likely to get pregnant each cycle than those with the lowest concentrations. During pregnancy severe stress, like losing a job or going through a divorce, can increase the chances of premature labor. There’s even some research suggesting that very high levels of stress can affect the developing fetal brain. Prenatal yoga and other stress-reduction techniques can help, so talk to your doctor if you’re severely stressed and pregnant.

10. Blood sugar Stress is known to raise blood sugar, and if you already have type 2 diabetes you may find that your blood sugar is higher when you are under stress.

One study of obese black women without diabetes found that those who produced more stress-related epinephrine when asked to recall stressful life events had higher fasting glucose and bigger blood sugar spikes than those with lower epinephrine, suggesting it might raise your risk for getting diabetes too. High swings in blood sugar equals early death.

11. Digestion Heartburn, stomach cramping, and diarrhea can all be caused by or worsened by stress. Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, which is characterized by pain and bouts of constipation and diarrhea is thought to be fueled in part by stress.

12. Blood pressure A stressful situation can raise your blood pressure temporarily. Chronic stress can cause more permanent changes in your blood pressure.

13. Brain tissue Brain-imaging research shows that major stresses can reduce the amount of tissue in regions of the brain that regulate emotions and self-control. This damage may make dealing with future stresses even harder. Reverse with effective stress-management techniques and neuroplasticity  practices.

14. Skin Stress can give you zits. Research suggests that students with acne are more prone to outbreaks during exams compared to less stressful time periods. An increase of male hormones known as androgens could be a culprit, particularly in women. Stress can also trigger psoriasis to appear for the first time or make an existing case more severe. Stress Management such as biofeedback and meditation can help.

15. Back pain Stress can set off an acute attack of back pain as well as contribute to ongoing chronic pain, due to the “fight or flight” response tensing your muscles. One European study found that people who are prone to anxiety and negative thinking are more likely to develop back pain, while a U.S. study tied anger and mental distress to ongoing back pain.

16. Sex appeal One study found that women were less attracted to men with high levels of the stress hormone cortisol compared to men with lower levels. Low levels of stress suggest strength, health and control which are desirable traits to be passed on to offspring.

17. Stroke A study of 20,000 people who had never had a stroke or heart disease found that stress was linked to an increased risk of stroke. In another recent study, healthy adults who had experienced a stressful life event within the past year were four times as likely to suffer a stroke than their less-stressed counterparts. Narrowing of the arteries (known as atherosclerosis) due to stress-related high blood pressure and diet.

18. Premature aging Traumatic events and chronic stress can both shorten telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of cell chromosomes, causing your cells to age faster.

19. Colds  Researchers believe stressed people’s immune cells may be less sensitive to a hormone that turns off inflammation reducing the immune system fight against the common colds and bronchitis.

20. Asthma Stress seems to exacerbate asthma in people who have the lung condition. In one study, children who experienced severe stress such as the death of a loved one had a nearly two-fold increase in the risk of an asthma attack over the following two weeks compared to those not under stress. Stress may amplify the immune response to asthma triggers such as pollen, animal dander, or dust.

21. Job performance Studies of employees ranging from military personnel to bankers show that stress reduces productivity and satisfaction at work, and is linked to depression too.

One solution is to ask your employer to offer stress-management training, which can address company-wide stressors like weak communication channels as well as focusing on stress busters for individuals. “Stress clearly has an effect on productivity, and the costs of that for employers can be very high,” Dr. Hagen points out.

22. Seizures Johns Hopkins Hospital Doctors have found that some people who are especially sensitive to stress can experience seizure-like symptoms, such as far-off staring and convulsions. Up to one-third of people treated for seizures at the hospital didn’t respond to standard anti-seizure medication and doctors concluded that they had stress-induced symptoms. Known as conversion disorder, some people can subconsciously express emotional trauma as physical symptoms, they say.

23. Sex drive Stressed out people have less sex and enjoy it less when they do get it as compared to people who aren’t under stress. Reducing and managing stress can often turn things around. If not, sexual dysfunction can have medical causes so it’s important to talk to a doctor.

–By Kate Fodor, Health.com – Edited by Richard Taylor

See Whole Article:
Courtesy of Health.com
http://t.healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/stress/23-surprising-ways-stress-affects-your-health#image=1
Copyright © 2013 Health Media Ventures, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

See our Stress Management Blogs for ways to reduce stress
or contact Richard Taylor, Principle Director of Atlanta Anger Management
to chat about your stress management needs and questions.

He offers One on One Private Sessions
as well as Stress Management Business On-site Seminars.

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate AAAMP

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

About.Me about.me/richardtaylorAAM
Atlanta’s #1 Oldest Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

INSOMNIA RELIEF

Stress – The Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep

Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind,  strengthen memory, results in more creativity,  improve your performance, curbs inflammation, improves your grades, affects weight loss, sharpens attention,  helps avoid accidents, lowers cortisol therefore lowers stress, keeps depression at bay.

INSOMNIA RELIEF – STRESS MANAGEMENT
Insomnia: Tips for Better Sleeping

1. Free Your Mind at Bedtime
Establish a “winding down” period in the evenings about an hour before bedtime. Read something calm, meditate, listen to soft music, or take a warm bath. Try making a list of any worries, along with a plan to deal with them, to bring closure to your day.

Tip: Even a 10-minute pre-sleep ritual may help when time is short.

2. Ban Blue Light in the Bedroom
Insomnia feeds on soft blue glow from a cell phone, PDA, speakers, clocks, etc. located in your sleeping room. The short waves of blue light may interfere with sleep.

Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue light producers an hour before sleep. Cover any blue displays you can’t shut off.

3. Avoid Naps
Napping makes matters worse if you have trouble falling asleep. But if you must nap, keep it brief, 20 minutes or less — and do it early in the day. Any shut-eye within eight hours of your bedtime can sabotage a good night’s sleep.

Tip: When an afternoon slump hits, go for a short walk, drink a glass of ice water, or call a friend.

4. Block the Clock
When you glance at the clock in the wee hours of the night, your sleep will suffer. You worry about how few hours are left before your busy day begins. Clock watchers should put their alarm away from view.

Tip: Use black tape for the blue LED digital clocks on the bedroom DVR.

5. Try a Leg Pillow for Back Pain
Mild low back pain may not wake you, but it can disrupt the deep, restful stages of sleep. Place a thin pillow between the legs for better alignment of the hips and reduced stress on the low back.

Tip: Back sleepers can tuck a pillow under their knees to help ease pain at night.

6. Put Your Neck in Neutral
If you wake tired with a stiff neck, blame your pillow. Pillows that are too fat or too flat cause problems. Your pillow should be just the right size to support your neck in a neutral position. For side sleepers, the nose should align with the center of the body. Stomach sleeping twists the neck and is best avoided.

Tip: Keep your neck neutral before bed, too. Don’t crane your neck to watch TV.

7. Reset Your Body Clock/Sleep Cycle
Go to sleep and wake up at about the same time every day — including weekends. This routine will put your brain and body on a healthy sleep-wake cycle. In time, you’ll be able to fall asleep quickly and sleep soundly through the night. Research says 8 Hours and 15 minutes permits the nature sleep cycle to be completed for best stress relieve and lower cortisol levels that lead to diabetes. Try to get at least 7 hours of sleep. Try to get to sleep before midnight. This also is important as 2:00AM is a critical time in the sleep/cortical cycle.

Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you rise. Light is the most powerful regulator of the biological clock.

8. Exercise Right, Time It Right
Regular exercise has been shown to improve sleep quality, as long as you don’t work out too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you go to sleep.

Tip: Gentle mind/body exercises are fine just before sleep. Yoga, meditation, tai chi, and similar routines are a perfect, sleep-inducing nightcap.

9. Eat Right at Night
Avoid heavy foods and big meals late in the day; Last meal before 8:00PM. They tax the digestive system and make it hard to get high-quality sleep. Some people do well with a light evening snack of sleep-inducing foods. Not junk food.

Tip: Finish any snack at least an hour before bed.

10. Stop Sipping After 8 pm
Nothing to drink within two hours of bedtime. It’ll help prevent those sleep-wrecking middle-of-the-night bathroom trips. And it can be difficult to get back to sleep quickly after hitting the cold bathroom floor.

Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to avoid bright light at night.

11. Rethink Your Drink
Although the tranquilizing effects of alcohol may make you sleepy at bedtime, after the initial effects wear off, alcohol actually causes more frequent awakenings at night and less restful sleep.

Tip: Warm milk or chamomile decaff tea are better beverage choices in the evening.

12. Skip Smoking
Nicotine is a stimulant, just like caffeine. Smoking can keep you from falling asleep and worsen insomnia.

Tip: While you’re planning your quit strategy, you may sleep a little better if you smoke fewer cigarettes in the four hours before bed.

13. Lower the Lights
Starting two to three hours before bedtime, dim the lights around the house and put aside any work, arguments, or complicated decisions. It takes time to turn off the emotional and intellectual “noise” of the day. Lowering the lights signals your brain to produce melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.

Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb when reading in the last hour before bed.

14. Neutralize Noise
A dripping faucet, a child’s cough, or a barking dog can add up to big-time sleep loss. And parents may be hypersensitive to noises in the night long after children outgrow the baby stage.

Tip: Soothing “white noise” covers up bumps in the night. You can use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise generator available in stores. Ear plugs also work.

15. Keep Pets Off the Bed
A cat or dog’s night moves can prevent you from settling into the deep sleep you crave. They can also bring fleas, fur, dander, and pollen to your bed, triggering sleep-wrecking allergies.

Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how to recondition your pet to sleep, happily, in its own bed.

16. Reserve the Bed for Sleep and Sex
Experts say sleep and sex should be the only pastimes pursued in the bedroom. Everything about the ‘bed room’ should be associated with rest and relaxation. Don’t balance the checkbook, talk on the phone, or watch TV.

Tip: The best sleep temperature for most people is between 68-72 degrees. Many like it colder with more blankets. Do what works for you.

17. Cut the Caffeine
Coffee in the morning is fine for most people, but as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks. Caffeine interferes with the deeper stages of sleep, so even small amounts found in chocolate and decaffeinated coffee may impact your rest.

Tip: Read labels: Lots of things we eat/drink contain caffeine.

18. Seal the Mattress
The sneezing, sniffling, and itching of allergies can cause fragmented sleep — and your mattress may be to blame. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Avoid these sleep wreckers by sealing your mattress, box springs, and pillow.

Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust proof covers work best.

19. Use Caution with Sleeping Pills
Sleeping pills may be tempting on those nights when sleep just isn’t coming, but use caution. Some sleep medicines can be habit forming and may have bothersome side effects. Ideally, they should be used as a very short-term solution, while other lifestyle and behavior changes are put in place.

20. When Insomnia Means Something More
Sleep tips are nice when your insomnia is fleeting. But if your sleeplessness persists for at least a month, it’s time to delve deeper into what’s going on. Insomnia may be a symptom of an underlying problem. Depression is notorious for causing insomnia, as are other medical conditions, such as acid reflux, asthma, arthritis, and some medications. Chronic insomnia deserves a closer look and evaluation by a doctor.

Source: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-benefits-10/slideshow-sleep-tips

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management 
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in:http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

A Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence