HOW TO BE KIND

How to Be Kind

Three Parts:Developing a Kinder Perspective Developing Kind Qualities Taking Action Community  Q&A

Being kind is a vital way of bringing meaning to our own lives as well as the lives of others. Being kind allows us to communicate better, be more compassionate, and also to be a positive force in people’s lives. Kindness has its true source deep within you, and while some people are innately kind, it’s something that everyone can cultivate by choice.

Part 1

Developing a Kinder Perspective

  1. Care for others genuinely. At its most basic, kindness is about caring genuinely for others around you, wanting the best for them, and recognizing in them the same wants, needs, aspirations, and even fears that you have too. Kindness is warm, resilient, patient, trusting, loyal, and grateful.[1] Piero Ferrucci sees kindness as being about “making less effort” because it frees us from getting knotted up in negative attitudes and feelings such as resentment, jealousy, suspicion, and manipulation.[2] Ultimately, kindness is deep caring for all beings.
    • Practice kindness and generosity toward others. Being out of practice, being shy, or not knowing how to reach out to others can only be overcome in the doing, by continually trying until it becomes a natural impulse to be kind and giving to others.
    • Ask for nothing in return. The greatest kindness expects nothing, comes with no strings attached, and places no conditions on anything done or said.

 

  1. Don’t be kind for the sake of getting what you want. Beware of deluded kindness. Kindness is not about “self-interested politeness, calculated generosity, superficial etiquette”.[3] Simply being nice to other people because you believe that this will manipulate them into giving you what you want in life, or as a means of controlling them, is not kindness. Nor is kindness about pretending to care for someone all the while repressing anger or contempt; hiding our rage or frustration behind false pleasantries is not kindness.
    • Finally, being a people pleaser is not kindness; that’s simply behavior designed to give in and not rock the boat because you’re afraid that taking a step forward will sink the ship.

 

  1. Be kind to yourself. Many people make the error of trying to be kind to others while at the same time not focusing on being kind to themselves. Some of this can stem from not liking aspects of yourself, but more often than not, it’s sourced in the inability to know yourself better. And unfortunately, when you don’t feel rock solid within yourself, your kindness to others risks falling into the deluded types of kindness described in the previous step. Or, it can lead to burn-out and disillusionment because you’ve put everyone else first.
    • Self-knowledge allows you to see what causes you pain and conflict, and enables you to embrace your contradictions and inconsistencies. It allows the space to work on things about yourself that you’re not happy with. In turn, self-knowledge helps to prevent you from projecting your negative aspects onto other people, thereby empowering you to treat other people with love and kindness.[4].
    • Take time to become more self-aware and use this learning to be kinder to both yourself (remembering that we all have weaknesses) and to others. In this way, your inner angst is being dealt with rather than fueling your need to project the hurt and pain.
    • Avoid viewing time taken to become more aware of your own needs and limits as an act of selfishness; far from it, it is a vital pre-condition to being able to reach out to other people with great strength and awareness.
    • Ask yourself what you think it means to be kinder to yourself. For many people, being kinder to themselves includes monitoring the chatter in your thoughts and stopping your negative thinking.

 

  1. Learn kindness from others. Think about the truly kind people in your life and how they make you feel. Do you carry their warm glow around in your heart every time you think of them? It is likely that you do because kindness lingers, warming you even when the hardest challenges face you. When other people find a way to love you for who you are, it’s impossible to forget such trust and confirmation of worthiness, and their kindness lives on forever.
    • Remember how other people’s kindness “makes your day”. What is it about their kindness that makes you feel special and cherished? Are there things that they do that you can replicate from your own heart?

 

  1. Cultivate kindness for the good of your own health. Improved psychological health and happiness comes from thinking more positively, and kindness is a positive mental state. While kindness is about giving and being open to others, giving kindness returns a sense of well-being and connection to us that improves our own mental state and health.
    • Although simple, the very ability to be kind is in itself a powerful and consistent reward, a self-esteem booster.[5]

 

  1. Make a habit of focusing on kindness. Leo Babauta says that kindness is a habit and is one that everyone can cultivate. He suggests focusing on kindness every day for a month. At the end of this directed focus, you’ll be aware of profound changes in your life, you’ll feel better about yourself as a person, and you’ll find that people react to you differently, including treating you better. As he says, in the long run, being kind is karma in practice.[6] Suggestions to help cultivate your kindness include:
    • Do one kind thing for someone every day. Make a conscious decision at the beginning of the day what that kind act will be and make time to do it during the day.
    • Be kind, friendly, and compassionate when you interact with someone, and even more so where that person normally makes you angry, stressed, or bothered. Use kindness as your strength.
    • Build up your small acts of kindness into larger acts of compassion. Volunteering for those in need and taking the initiative to relieve suffering are bigger acts of compassion.[7]
    • Meditate to help spread kindness. Read Practice Loving Kindness Meditation (Metta) for more details.

 

  1. Be kind to everyone, not just people “in need”. Expand your circle of kindness. It can be very easy to be kind when we’re unconsciously doing what Stephanie Dowrick terms “patronizing kindness”.[8] This refers to kindness given to those people we feel are truly in need (the sick, the poor, the vulnerable, and those who align with our own ideals). Being kind to people close to us, emotionally (like family or friends) or in other ways (from the same country, of the same color, gender etc.), is also easier than being kind to those the philosopher Hegel called “the other”. It can be more difficult to be kind to people we may consider our equals, but it will be worth it.
    • The trouble with restricting our kindness to “convenient” cases is that we fail to recognize that we need to be kind to everyone, no matter who they are, their level of wealth or fortune, their values and beliefs, their behavior and attitudes, their place of origin, their likeness to ourselves, etc.
    • By choosing to be kind only to those we feel are deserving of kindness, we are unleashing our own biases and judgment, and only practicing conditional kindness. Natural kindness encompasses all beings and while the challenges you’ll face when trying to put this broader notion of kindness into practice will sometimes be trying, you’ll never stop learning about the depths of your ability to be truly kind.
    • If you’re neglecting being kind to someone else just because you think they can cope without your support or understanding, then you’re practicing selective kindness.

 

  1. Minimize judgment. If you really want to be kind, then you have to kick your judgment to the curb. Instead of spending your time being critical of other people, work on being positive and compassionate. If you tend to think poorly of others, wish other people could step up their game, or feel like the people around you are needy or clueless, then you’ll never learn true kindness. Stop judging people and realize that you’ll never fully understand where they’re coming from unless you walk a day in their shoes. Focus on wanting to help others instead of judging them for not being better than they are.
    • If you’re judgmental, prone to gossip, or just always bad-mouthing the people around you, you’ll never be able to move past your reservations to be kind.
    • Being kind means giving people the benefit of the doubt instead of expecting perfection.

Be Kind

Part 2

Developing Kind Qualities

  1. Be compassionate toward others. It’s important to take in the message, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle”. Attributed to Plato, this saying is a recognition that everyone is undergoing some challenge or other in their lives and that sometimes, it’s all too easy for us to lose sight of that when embroiled in our own problems or anger against them. Before committing an action that might impact another person negatively, ask yourself a simple question: “Is this kind?”. If you cannot answer this in the affirmative, this is a reminder to change your action and approach immediately.
    • Even where you’re feeling at your very worst, remember that other people are also feeling uncertainty, pain, hardship, sadness, disappointment, and loss. In no way does this belittle your own feelings but it does allow you to realize that people often react from their hurt and pain rather than from their whole self, and kindness is the key to seeing past the raging emotions and connecting with the real person inside.

 

  1. Don’t expect perfection. If you have a tendency toward perfectionism, competitiveness, or a driven sense of urgency, self-kindness can often be a victim of your ambition and fast pace, as well as your fear of being seen to be lazy or selfish.[9] Remember to slow down and to forgive yourself when things don’t work out as wished.
    • Learn from your mistakes rather than beating yourself up over them, or comparing yourself to others.[10] It is through self-compassionate responses that you can start to see other people’s needs in a compassionate light.
  2. Be present. The greatest gift of kindness to another person is to be in the moment in their presence, to be listening with care, and to be genuinely attentive to them. Schedule your day differently, and stop being known as the person who always rushes off. Being present means being available; you can only do this if you’re not rushing or squeezing in people and activities.
    • Ease off the technical means of communicating with others. Impersonal and hurried technical communications like text and email have their place in life, but not as your only means of communicating. Take time to connect with people face-to-face, or via an uninterrupted phone call. Send a letter instead of an email and surprise someone with the kindness of your having taken time out of your day to put pen to paper.

 

  1. Be a good listener. The act of listening is easier said than done in our fast-paced world, where rushing and being busy are seen as virtues; where cutting someone off because you’re too busy, or you need to get somewhere in a hurry, is the norm. Making being busy into a habit is no excuse for unkindness, however. When talking to someone, learn to listen with your whole being and sincerely pay attention to them until they’re done revealing their thoughts and story.
    • Truly listening to someone, making eye contact, avoiding all distractions, and giving a person the time of day is one of the greatest acts of kindness. Take the time to truly absorb what the person is saying before responding with a pre-made answer or interrupting. Show the person that you appreciate the unique situation he’s in and that you’re there to lend an ear.
    • Being a good listener doesn’t mean being a great problem solver. Sometimes, the best thing you can do is just be there to listen, while acknowledging that you don’t know what the person should do.

 

  1. Be optimistic. Happiness, joy, and gratitude rest at the heart of kindness, allowing you to see the good in others and the world, enabling you to press through the challenges, despair, and cruelty you witness and experience, continuously restoring your sense of faith in humanity. Maintaining an optimistic attitude ensures that acts of kindness are committed with genuine joy and cheerfulness rather than with reluctance or out of a sense of duty or service. And keeping your sense of humor ensures that you don’t take yourself too seriously and take life’s contradictory and contrary moments with good faith.
    • It’s not always easy to be optimistic, especially when you’ve had a crummy day. But with enough practice, anyone can cultivate optimism by focusing on the positive instead of the negative, thinking ahead to happy things in the future, and living a life that is filled with more joy than sadness. And it doesn’t cost a dollar to look on the brighter side of things, either.
    • Being optimistic and staying positive will not only put you in more of a mindset to be kind, but it will also bring joy to those around you. If you spend much of your time complaining, then it will be more difficult to bring happiness to the people in your orbit.
    • Read How to be happy, How to be funny, and How to be thankful for more information on how to cultivate optimism.

 

  1. Be friendly. People who are kind tend to also be friendly. This doesn’t mean they are the most outgoing people in the room, but that they make an effort to get to know new people and to make them feel at home. If there’s someone new at your school or workplace, you can try to talk to that person, explain how things work, and even invite him or her to social events. Even if you’re not outgoing, just smiling and making small talk with people can go a long way in making you friendlier, and this kindness will not go unnoticed.
    • Friendly people are kind because they expect the best from people. They talk to new people and friends alike in an easygoing, reassuring way that makes them feel at home.
    • If you’re naturally shy, you don’t have to change your personality completely. Just make a bit more of an effort to be nice to people by giving them your attention, asking them how they are, and showing an interest in them.

 

  1. Be polite. Although being polite is not an indication of kindness in itself, genuine politeness demonstrates your respect for those you’re interacting with. Being polite is the kind way of getting people’s attention and putting your point across. Some simple ways to do this include:
    • Find ways to rephrase your requests or responses to others. For example, say “May I?” instead of “Can I?”; say “I’m surprised” instead of “That’s not fair”; say “Let me explain that another way” instead of saying “That’s not what I said”. Rephrasing your language speaks volumes.
    • Have excellent manners. Hold doors open for people, avoid being overly vulgar in person, and don’t be overly familiar with new people.
    • Make compliments and mean them.
    • Read How to practice courtesy and kindness for more ideas.

 

  1. Be grateful. People who are truly kind are easily able to express gratitude. They don’t take anything for granted and always thank people for helping them out. They know how to say “thank you” and really mean it, they write thank-you cards, and they are comfortable with acknowledging when they have been helped. People who are grateful also thank people just because, for things like making their days brighter, instead of only thanking them for completing specific tasks. If you make a habit of being more grateful to the people around you, you’ll see that your capacity for kinds will increase.
    • If you’re more observant of all the nice things other people do for you, then you’ll be more ready to do nice things for others. You’ll be more aware of how good the kindness of others makes you feel and will feel more inclined to spread the love.

Be Kind

Part 3

Taking Action

  1. Love animals and the living world. Loving animals and caring for pets is kindness in action. Nothing compels you to care about beings of another species, especially in a day and age where the tools of human domination are so powerful. And yet, the very act of loving an animal and respecting the animal for its own value is an expression of deep kindness. As well, being kind to the world that sustains and nurtures us is sensible as well as kind, ensuring that we don’t poison the very elements that assure us a healthy life.
    • Adopt or foster a pet. Your kindness will be rewarded by letting another being into your life who will bring you joy and love.
    • Offer to pet-sit for a friend who is going away. Give your friend the reassurance that someone loving and caring will be tending to her pet while she’s away.
    • Respect the species you’re caring for. Humans don’t “own” animals; rather, we stand in a relationship of being responsible for their well-being and care.
    • Take time to restore parts of your local environment with the local community. Go for walks in nature with family, friends, alone, and commune with the world that you’re a part of. Share your love for nature with others, to help reawaken their sense of connection with nature.

 

  1. Share. People who are kind are happy to share with others. You can share your favorite sweater, half of your delicious enchilada, or even words of career advice to someone younger than you. The important thing is that you’re sharing something that you actually care about, instead of giving away something you don’t really need. It’s much more meaningful to let your friend borrow your favorite sweater than to give her an old hand-me-down you never wear. Sharing with people will make you more generous and thus, more inclined towards kindness.
    • Keep an eye out for people who would really benefit from some of the things you have. They may not always ask for them, but you can offer them readily before they admit that they need something from you.

 

  1. Smile more. Smiling is a simple act of kindness that can go a long way. Make a habit of smiling at strangers, or at your friends or acquaintances. Though you don’t have to walk around with a smile plastered on your face, smiling at people will make them smile back, and will bring even a modicum of joy to their days. What’s more, smiling can actually trick your mind into feeling happier than it previously was. Everybody wins when you smile, and your capacity for kindness will grow in the process.
    • Smiling at people will also make them more comfortable and will make you look more approachable, which is another way of being kind. Being welcoming to others, and even giving strangers the benefit of the doubt by smiling at them, is another way of being kind.

 

  1. Take an interest in people. People who are truly kind are genuinely interested in other people. They aren’t kind to them just because they want to get what they want or because they are fishing for a favor. They do it because they genuinely care about how people are doing and want those around them to be happy and healthy. To be more kind, work on developing an interest in other people and show them that you care by being attentive, asking questions, and paying attention to them. Here are some ways to take an interest in people:
    • Ask people how they are and mean it.
    • Ask people about their hobbies, interests, and families.
    • If someone you cared about had a big life event, ask that person how it went.
    • If someone you know has a big exam or interview coming up, wish him or her luck.
    • When you talk to people, make sure they are doing at least about half of the talking. Don’t dominate a conversation and focus more on the other person than yourself.
    • Make eye contact and put away your cell phone when you talk to people. Show that they are your first priority.

 

  1. Call up a friend just because. You don’t always need a reason to call up a good friend. Make a goal of calling one friend per week, or even two friends per week, just to catch up and see how that person is doing. Don’t call to make plans or to ask that person something specific; call just because you miss your friend and have been thinking about him or her. Getting in touch with your friends out of the blue will make them feel cared for and will make you feel good; this shows kindness and thoughtfulness.
    • If you’re really short on time, you can start by making a habit of calling up your friends on their birthdays. Don’t be lazy and send a text message or even a Facebook post, but give your friend a phone call from the heart.

 

  1. Donate your things. Another way to be kind is to donate some of your belongings to charity. Instead of throwing out your old things or selling them for 50 cents at a garage sale, donate the things you don’t need to a good cause. If you have clothes, books, or other household items that are in good condition, then making a habit of donating these things to charity instead of storing them up or tossing them is a great way to spread your kindness to others.
    • If you have some clothes or books that someone you know would want, then don’t be shy about donating those items to that person. This is another way of being kind.

 

  1. Do a random act of kindness. “Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.” These are the words once said by Princess Diana. The practice of random acts of kindness is alive and well as a conscious effort to spread more kindness; there are even groups that have established themselves to perform this essential civic duty! Here are some great random acts of kindness you can do:
    • Shovel a neighbor’s driveway as well as your own.
    • Wash a friend’s car.
    • Put money into an expired meter.
    • Help someone carry a heavy bag.
    • Leave a gift on someone’s doorstep.
    • For more details on practicing random acts of kindness, read How to practice random acts of kindness.

 

  1. Transform your life through kindness. Changing how you live and how you view the world might seem daunting. But take a note of Aldous Huxley’s prescription for transforming your life: “People often ask me what is the most effective technique for transforming their life. It is a little embarrassing that after years and years of research and experimentation, I have to say that the best answer is–just be a little kinder.”[11] Take Huxley’s many years of research to heart and allow kindness to transform your life, to transcend all feelings and actions of aggression, hate, despising, anger, fear, and self-deprecation, and to restore strength worn away by despair.
    • Through being kind, you take a stand by affirming that caring for others, for our environment, for yourself is the right way to live life.[12] It isn’t about immediate effectiveness; kindness is a lifestyle choice, a constant hum and rhythm accompanying every single thing that you think and do.
    • Through being kind, you let go of the burden of worrying that others have more than you, are less or more deserving than you, or are in a position of superiority or inferiority to you. Instead, kindness assumes everyone is worthy, you included.
    • Through being kind, you recognize that we are all in this together. When you harm another person, you also harm yourself. What you do to support others also supports you.

Community Q&A

  • How do I be kind when I am upset, sad, or grumpy?

Recognize your emotional state and find ways to calm yourself: deep breaths, taking some alone time, et cetera. Focus entirely on the other person. If you’re too upset to handle it, say “I’m upset and I can’t be a good listener right now.” Give yourself patience and time, and don’t push things before you’re ready.

 

  • How can I be kind to others when I feel empty or don’t care about others?

If you feel this way, you need to start by being kind to yourself first. You’re projecting what you feel deep inside about yourself — empty and without self care. Spend some time caring for your own self and needs first, perhaps getting counseling for unresolved issues that are holding you back from being your best self. When you learn to love yourself and take good care of you, then you’ll find it much easier to be kind to others.

 

  • How do you be nice to people when they are always attacking you, physically or emotionally?

Rise above and do your best to remove those people from your life. Dealing with not nice people isn’t always fun or fair, but you will thank yourself for staying true to your kind self.

  • How do I remain calm when I feel like someone’s using me?

If you feel like someone is using you, tell them your feelings directly. If they are your friend, they will not be mad at you for sharing your opinion. If you’re having trouble staying calm around this person, you may want to take a break from spending time with them.

 

  • Do I have to be kind even when some people never appreciate my kindness?

Being kind for the sake of being kind doesn’t require appreciation in return. If you place a condition on kindness, then it’s not really being kind. There are many reasons why people aren’t instantly or obviously appreciative, including astonishment, exhaustion, slowness to respond, obtuseness, quiet appreciation, etc. Some people are rude but that just means more kindness is needed. It may also help you to understand that it’s more about your karma, not theirs, without being a doormat, of course.

  • Am I ever too old to make this change?

No, you’re never too old. Everyone of every age can benefit from being kinder. If you’ve been mean your whole life, it might take people some time to adjust to your change of heart, but it’s worth it!

  • Why do we need to learn kindness from others?

It’s not so much about learning kindness as about unlearning all the defensiveness that socializing teaches us. We feel safer being defensive and self/family protective, and this is part of our ancient ancestral understandings that enhance survival. Kindness often forces us to put ourselves in other people’s shoes, to understand where they’re coming from even if we don’t usually think like them. It also requires a spirit of generosity and care for strangers, which can sometimes be difficult when we worry about our own/own family’s needs. Yet, kindness begets kindness, so it is often through seeing others’ kindness that we learn it has beneficial, supportive and caring outcomes that each of us aspires to in the greater scheme of life.

Source: http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Kind

 

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EXTREME ROAD RAGE CBS46 REPORT

Road Rage: Misunderstandings turn dangerous with weapons involved

Posted: Nov 04, 2015 2:18 PM EST Updated: Nov 04, 2015 6:06 PM EST

ATLANTA (CBS46) –

With drivers in Atlanta ranked as some of the most discourteous on the road, commutes can turn into disputes.

When weapons are involved, a misunderstanding on the roadway can turn dangerous, and in the Atlanta area’s traffic, we’ve seen it happen all too often.

“Do you want to go home tonight?”

Richard Taylor with Atlanta Anger Management is an expert on rage.

“Is it worth it to get engaged with a driver who you don’t know has a gun or not?” Taylor said. “Do you want to eat tonight? Do you want to go home tonight? That becomes the question.”

Taylor said as we’re driving around the seemingly never-ending cluster of cars Atlanta is famous for incidents that drivers don’t like happen every day.

Some of those drivers come to see Taylor in his office daily and he sees news reports of angry people on the roads.

“They snap,” he said. “They’re losing their conscious ability to be reasonable and they just focus on the one person… That’s the big debate we have in the nation is over access to guns.”

Taylor said stress and anger play major roles in the road rage situation, but if you add a weapon into the mix and it can become a criminal case.

Incidents all too common

A witness to a road rage in Coweta County said, from what she saw, a suspect who pointed a gun at a car used the weapon as a first instinct.

CBS46 News

“Pulling a firearm, in just about every case, should be an absolute last resort and it seems like it was this guy’s first resort” the witness said.

In another incident, a baby was shot in the foot in what police determined was a dispute on the road in DeKalb County.

In the case of the aforementioned Corvette driver, she reportedly gestured to the car behind her to go around, and the driver of the Mustang opened fire.

So what can you to avoid road rage situations? Professionals suggest NOT flashing your lights and avoiding any sort of reaction to other drivers, including hand gestures.

Getting out of your car should never be an option, experts say.

If you’re prone to getting angry, officials say it’s best not to carry your gun in the car.

Copyright 2015 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Supermoon Blood Moon Eclipse Viewing Sept 27, 2015


NASA VIDEO

As Space.com explains: “Supermoons occur when the moon reaches its full phase at or near the satellite’s closest approach to Earth, and appears abnormally large and bright as a result. The Sept. 27 event is quite special; the last supermoon eclipse occurred in 1982, and the next won’t take place until 2033.”

The total eclipse will also feature a blood moon.

Sunday’s event is also the culmination of a “tetrad” — the last of four successive lunar eclipses that started with the April 15, 2014, eclipse, followed by one on Oct. 8, 2014, and again on April 4 of this year.

As Sky & Telescope writes: “Observers in the eastern half of North America can watch every stage of the eclipse, from beginning to end of the partial phases (3 1⁄3 hours in all) during convenient hours of late twilight or darkness with the Moon mostly high in the sky. If you’re in the Far West, the first partial stage of the eclipse is already in progress when the Moon rises (due east) around the time of sunset. Those in Europe and Africa see the eclipse on the local morning of the 28th.”

Totality (when the moon is completely in Earth’s shadow) arrives at 10:10.7 p.m. ET for those in the country’s East, or 9:11 p.m. CT for those in the Midwest.

Total eclipse of the Moon
Delta T: 68.0s

ATLANTA, GEORGIA
o ‘ o ‘
W084 25, N33 46

Eastern Daylight Time

Moon’s
Azimuth Altitude
h m o o
Moonrise 2015 Sep 27 19:20 89.1 —-
Moon enters penumbra 2015 Sep 27 20:10.3 95.8 9.5
Moon enters umbra 2015 Sep 27 21:06.8 103.8 20.7
Moon enters totality 2015 Sep 27 22:10.7 114.3 33.0
Middle of eclipse 2015 Sep 27 22:47.1 121.7 39.6
Moon leaves totality 2015 Sep 27 23:23.5 130.5 45.6
Moon leaves umbra 2015 Sep 28 00:27.4 151.0 54.1
Moon leaves penumbra 2015 Sep 28 01:24.0 174.9 57.7
Moonset 2015 Sep 28 07:58 273.9 —-

Combat Anxiety Video

http://www.today.com/video/how-to-combat-anxiety-hint-its-not-deep-breathing-522188355699

Study says workplace stress is as bad as secondhand smoke

Tips on how to cope

Sep. 10, 2015 at 12:10 PMJordi Lippe
TODAY

We all know that spending hours a day behind a desk can be stressful, tiring and boring. How many times have you found yourself looking at the minute hand on the clock begging for it to be 5 p.m.?

Now, more than ever, those eight hour days are stretching into 10- and even 11-hour days, causing the U.S. workforce to spend less time with their families, exercise less frequently, and feel greater overall stress. A recent study from Stanford and Harvard universities found that workplace stress is about as dangerous to one’s health as secondhand smoke.

RELATED: 17 easy ways to relax from people who know how to chill

In fact, 90 percent of visits to primary care physicians are stress-related and this pressure is considered the epidemic of the 21st century, according to Kathleen Hall, founder and CEO of the Mindful Living Network and the Stress Institute. She added that over 60 percent of American workers say their jobs are a very significant source of stress and it’s leading to an increase in heart disease, insomnia, obesity, hypertension, depression and decreasing your life expectancy.

“Employee’s chronic stress costs corporations billions of dollars each year because of lack of productivity, poor performance, increased absenteeism, negative attitudes and health-care costs,” Hall told TODAY.com. “We sit at computer screens all day instead of moving and working with our bodies. This causes a host of mental and physical health problems today.”

This new wave of technology and use of computers and emails is the catalyst, along with Americans not trusting the companies they work for any more, according to Hall. Work-life balance, something millennial workers are striving for, is lacking at many companies, leaving employees feeling objectified and creating an unfriendly, demanding and cold workplace that breeds this stress.

The problem manifests both physical and mentally from two common types of stress in an office environment: internal and external. “Internal are the emotional conflict and pressures we place on ourselves, which can cause enough stress to manifest in physical ailments like back pain,” Todd Sinett, a New York-based chiropractor and author of 3 Weeks to a Better Back told TODAY.com.

“It isn’t surprising then that the greatest number of heart attacks occur on Monday mornings, as people physically respond to the thought of the weekend being over and the start of the work week.”

Meanwhile, external factors include events, temporary stress and outside influences that people feel are beyond their control. “This can be anything from a meeting not starting on time to a co-worker’s pessimistic personality creating a toxic environment,” he said. “Ultimately, negative energy and emotions can impact both your daily routine as well as your health.”

What are some simple changes you can make in your everyday work routine to ease that stress? Sinett offered these quick exercises to help get you through the next hour, day or week:

Find a quiet spot.

Just close your office door if you have to. Sit in a comfortable pose, take off your glasses if you wear them, and close your eyes. Press the fingertips of both hands lightly along the ridge above your brow. Take five slow breaths.

Take full, deep breaths, inhaling and exhaling completely.

This exercise is extremely cleansing and calming. When people become stressed, their breathing rate speeds up, and in order to relax, the breath needs to be slowed down. Inhale slowly for a count of four. Hold it for a count of four. Exhale for a count of four.

Walk around and move.

Walking is not only a great stress reliever, but it’s also helpful in relieving back pain. You don’t have to power walk, just get up during the day to not only move your body, but also clear your mind.

Have good, nutritional snacks on hand.

Avoid sugary drinks and snacks, as well as too much caffeine. Instead, balance your foods and blood sugar throughout the day by incorporating healthy foods like nuts, fruit and cheese.

Incorporate regular stretches into your day.

Too often, we think of stress as something affecting us emotionally, but there is also the physical stress of sitting at your computer all day. To counteract this posture, try a Bruegger’s stretch, a pose that involves rotating your arms out and opening up your posture, or the following:

Standing abdominal stretch: Stand with your feet about hip distance apart, with knees slightly bent. Lift arms in front of you until they are extended straight overhead. Bend back slightly, stretching the abs. Repeat 10 times.

Thumbs to pits: Sit on a chair with your back straight. With your fingers spread out, place your thumbs under your armpits and push in with slight pressure. Tilt your face up with your sternum out to feel the stretch across your chest.

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Stress Management

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Office Phone: 678-576-1913
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Fizzy Soda Linked To Cardiac Arrest; Aspartame Study

Fizzy Soda Linked To Cardiac Arrest
• Diana Herrington
• September 12, 2015
A recent study is now showing us that soda is not only just unhealthy, it can also be deadly. The average American drinks over 40 gallons of soft drinks per year. This is down from 53 gallons in 2000, but guess what? – that is still a LOT of pop!

Carbonated beverages are associated with Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA) according to European Society of Cardiology research done by the cardiology department at Fukuoka University in Japan.

What is a Cardiac Arrest?

Cardiac arrest is when the heart suddenly stops pumping blood around the body. It is not the same as a heart attack. When having a heart attack, the supply of blood to the heart is suddenly blocked, usually by a blood clot. This is a circulation problem whereas cardiac arrest is more of an electrical problem.

Over 424,000 people experience OHCA yearly as assessed by emergency medical services.
A cardiac arrest strikes without warning. The person can be feeling just fine one minute, then unconscious the next. With loss of consciousness comes stoppage of breath. If not immediately treated with CPR, death can occur within minutes.
The numbers that survive a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting are only 10 percent according to Heart.Org statistics.

The Study

Beverage consumption of almost 800,000 people between the years of 2005 and 2011 was tracked in Japan.
They found that those who spent more money on carbonated beverages were more likely to suffer cardiac arrests outside of a hospital.
This study is the first to make a link between drinking large amounts of carbonated beverages and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), says the principal investigator Professor Keijiro Saku, Dean at Fukuoka University.

Many carbonated beverages contain acids which might play an important role in this link, says Professor Saku.

Drinking green tea, black tea, coffee, cocoa, fruit or vegetable juice, fermented milk beverage, milk and mineral water were not found to be associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin.

“We already know that sweet drinks can lead to obesity and Type 2 Diabetes, which is a major cause of heart disease.” says Prof Peter Weissberg, medical director of the British Heart Foundation.

Just Drop The Pop

Many people drink diet pop since they think the lack of sugar will be healthier and help them lost weight. Put in the context of cardiac arrests, it’s still a fizzy pop whose acids are potentially fatal. Diet pop is also full of aspartame which many studies have shown that it is not good for us.

Learn more about Artificial Sweeteners.

How To Avoid OHCA
1. Double or triple the victim’s chance of survival by performing CPR immediately after cardiac arrest.
To learn more about hands only CPR, visit American Health Association HandsOnlyCPR.org [ SEE BELOW VUDIO ] where there is a brief demonstration video on how to perform hands only CPR.
2. Try some healthy beverages to replace those unhealthy pops. Here are some ideas:
Sugar Free Lemon Aid: the easy fast way to alkalize your body.
Sparking Cucumber Lemon Water: Cooling and refreshing!
Wonderful Watermelon Juice: So easy so yummy!
5 Caffeine-Free Iced Tea Recipes
The Tasty Milk Alternative You Haven’t Tried
Enjoy! What healthy drinks do you prefer?

Source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/fizzy-soda-linked-to-cardiac-arrest.html#ixzz3lgKE6VIM

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Watch and learn the simple steps in this new 60-second demo video to help save a life with Hands-Only CPR. The two steps for Hands-Only CPR, (Call 9 – 1 -1, then pump chest 100 beats a minute until help arrives).

HandsOnlyCPR.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aspartame Studies -When are YOU going to STOP?

• Spread The Word to Friends And Family By Sharing This Article.

Here is a list of 68 studies. (see below)

Health Problem: Brain damage/Cognitive skills disruption/Retardation/Neurochemical changes in the brain/Behavioral and Mood Changes/Problems
1. Year Published: 1970
Full Reference: Brain Damage in Infant Mice Following Oral Intake of Glutamate, Aspartate, or Cysteine; Nature 1970;227-609-610
Funded By: Washington University
Conclusion/Findings: Irreversible degenerative changes and acute neuronal necrosis
Hyperlink to Study http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v227/n5258/pdf/227609b0.pdf

2. Year Published: 2008
Full Reference: Direct and Indirect Cellular Effects of Aspartame on the Brain. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2008) 62, 451-462; P. Humphries, E. Pretorius, and H. Naude
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Excessive aspartame ingestion might cause certain mental disorders, as well as compromised learning and emotional functioning
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/sepp/aspartamebrain.pdf

3. Year Published: 2007
Full Reference: Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning During Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats, Morando Soffritti, Fiorella Belpoggi, Eva Tibaldi, Davide Degli Esposti, Michelina Lauriola; Environmental Health Perspectives, 115(9) Sep 2007; 115:1293-1297. doi:10.1289/ehp.10271.
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Carcinogenicity proven a second time; with effects increased when exposure to aspartame begins during fetal life.
Hyperlink to Study: http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info:doi/10.1289/ehp.10271

4. Year Published: 1984
Full Reference: Effects of Aspartame and Glucose on Rat Brain Amino Acids and Serotonin. Yokogoshi H, Roberst CH, Caballero B, Wurtman RJ. American Journal of clinical Nutrition. 1984 July, 40(1):1-7
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: High aspartame doses can generate major neurochemical changes in rats, especially when consumed along with carbohydrate-containing foods
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6204522

5. Year Published: 1984
Full Reference: Revelance of Animal Studies to Human Safety. Olney, JW. Neurobehavioral Toxicology and Teratology. 1984; 6:455-462
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Excitotoxins, as used in foods today, may produce blood elevations high enough to cause damage to the nervous system of young children, damage which is not detectable at the time of occurrence but which may give rise to subtle disturbances in neuroendocrine function in adolescence and/or adulthood.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6152304

6. Year Published: 1996
Full Reference: Increasing Brain Tumor Rates: Is There a Link to Aspartame? Olney JW, Farber NB, Spitznagel E, Robins LN. Journal of Neuropatholgy & Experimental Neurology. 1996 Nov; 55(11):1115-23
Funded By: NIH
Conclusion/Findings: Brain tumor incidence in the US implicates the introduction of aspartame into the American diet.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8939194

7. Year Published: 2000
Full Reference: Glutamate and Aspartate Impair Memory Retention and Damage Hypothalamic Neurons in Adult Mice. Cheol Hyoung Park, Se Hoon Coi, et al. Toxicology Letters, Vol. 115, Issue 2, May 19, 2000, pp. 117-125
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Found that aspartate shortens the memory response, impairs memory retention and damages hypothalamic neurons in mice
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TCR-408BJC1-4&_user=10&_coverDate=05%2F19%2F2000&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view
=c&_searchStrId=1456058577&
_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=395a2fc9d4ef0ffceeea475146341607
&searchtype=a

8. Year Published: 2002
Full Reference: Effect of Aspartame on N-Methyl-D Asparate Sensitive L-(311) Glutamate Binding Sites in Rat Brain Synpatic Membranes, AV Glushakov, DM Dennis, et al. Molecular Psychiatry, 2002, Vol. 7, No. 4, pp. 359-367.
Funded By: University of Florida
Conclusion/Findings: Shows that aspartate has a role in causing mental retardation, but the mechanism by which it does that is still unknown.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/v7/n4/full/4000976a.html

9. Year Published: 2006
Full Reference: The Effect of Aspartame Metabolites on Human Erythrocyte Membrane Acetylcholinesterase Activity. Stylianos Tsakiris, Aglaia Giannoulia-Karantana, et al., Pharmacological Research, Volv. 53, Issue 1, Jan. 2006. pp. 1-5.
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Found that high concentrations of aspartame can cause neurological symptoms, including memory and learning problems.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16129618

10. Year Published: 2008
Full Reference: Direct and Indirect Cellular Effects of Aspartame on the Brain, P Humphries, E Pretorius and H Naude, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 2008, 62, 451-462
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Asserts that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v62/n4/abs/1602866a.html

11. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Evaluation of Reactions to Food Additives: The Aspartame Experience. MK Bradstock, MK Serdula, JS Marks, RJ Barnard, Nt Crane, PL Remington and FL Trowbridge. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 43, pp. 464-469, 1986
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Identified some case reports in which the symptoms may be attributable to aspartame in commonly-consumed amounts. Headache, mood alterations (anxiety, agitation, irritability, or depression), insomnia, dizziness, and fatigue were the most frequently reported symptoms, with one case of a child in a double-blind test who became hyperactive after consuming products with aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/43/3/464 and http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/43/3/464

12. Year Published: 1990
Full Reference: Aspartame: Clinical Update, Potenza DP, el-Mallakh RS, Connecticut Medicine, 1990 Apr;54(4):235-6.
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Raises concern that so many reports of headaches, seizures, blindness, and cognitive and behavioral changes with long-term, high-dose aspartame have been reported that health officials need to be concerned.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2667892

13. Year Published: 1993
Full Reference: Adverse Reactions to Aspartame: Double-Blind Challenge in Patients from a Vulnerable Population. Ralph G. Walton, Robert Hudak, Ruth J. Green-Waite. Psychiatry. July 1, 1993. Vol. 34, Issue 1, pp. 13-17.
Funded By: Dept. of Psychiatry Northeastern Ohio,Universities College of Medicine and University Hospital of Cleveland
Conclusion/Findings: Found that individuals with mood disorders are particularly sensitive to this artificial sweetener and its use in this population should be discouraged. In the clinical study, the project was halted by the Institutional Review Board after a total of 13 individuals had completed the study because of the severity of reactions within the group of patients with a history of depression
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/0006-3223%2893%2990251-8/abstract

14. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Seizure and Mania After High Intake of Aspartame
Funded By: Jamestown General Hospital, Jamestown, New York
Conclusion/Findings: Case report of a woman who drank in excessive of 1 gallon per day of iced tea sweetened with aspartame, resulting in manic episode and seizure that led to hospitalization.
Hyperlink to Study: http://psy.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/pdf_extract/27/3/218

15. Year Published: 1991
Full Reference: Effect of Aspartame and Protein, Administered in Phenylalanine-Equivalent Doses, on Plasma Neutral Amino Acids, Aspartate, Insulin and Glucose in Man, Svend E. Moller; Pharmacology & Toxicology, Vol. 68, Issue 5, pp. 408-412.
Funded By: Clinical Research Laboratory, Denmark
Conclusion/Findings: The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122214234/abstract

16. Year Published: 1994
Full Reference: Effects of Diets High in Sucrose or Aspartame on the Behavior and Cognitive Performance of Children. Mark L. Wolraich, Scott D. Lingren, et al. New England Journal of Medicine, Feb. 3, 1994; pp. 330:301-307
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Reported that it is possible that there are some children who respond adversely to sugar or aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199402033300501#articleResults

17. Year Published: 1985
Full Reference: Loss of Intellectual Function in Children with Phenylketonuria After Relaxation of Dietary Phenylalanine Restriction, Margretta R. Seashore, Estelle Friedman, Robert A. Novelly P, Vijaya Bapat MD. Pediatrics vol. 75, No. 2, Feb. 1985, pp. 226-232
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Shows decrease in intellectual function in children with PKU who have phenylalnine introduced into their diets.
Hyperlink to Study: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/75/2/226

18. Year Published: 1987
Full Reference: Aspartame Effects on Brain Serotonin, RI Wurtman, Letter in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1987 April; 45(4):799-803
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Argues that using rodents to disprove aspartame’s harm to humans is not relevant, and that it reacts more negatively in humans than in mice
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/45/4/799.pdf

19. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Acute Effects of Oral or Parenteral Aspartame on Catecholamine Metabolism in Various Regions of Rat Brain, Hidehiko Yokogoshi and Richard J. Wurtman, The Journal of Nutrition, November 1986
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Found higher plasma tyrosine and phenylalanine ratios and other effects on the brain.
Hyperlink to Study: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/116/3/356

20. Year Published: 1992
Full Reference: Aspartame Exacerbates EEG Spike Wave Discharge in Children with Generalized Absence Epilepsy, PR Camfield, CS Camfield, JM Dooley, et al;
Funded By: Ontario Ministry of Health
Conclusion/Findings: Neurology 1992:42:1000
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/42/5/1000

21. Year Published: 1993
Full Reference: The Effect of Food Chemicals on Cell Aging of Human Diploid Cells in Vitro Culture, Kasamaki A and Urasawa S, The Journal of Toxicological Sciences, 1993 Aug; 18(3):143-53
Funded By: Toxicological Sciences, 1993 Aug; 18(3):143-53. Sapporo
Conclusion/Findings: Showed aging of cells when treated with aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8246307

22. Year Published: 1994
Full Reference: Neuropharmacological Evaltuation of Movement Disorders that are Adverse Reactions to Specific Foods Including Aspartame, John W. Gerrard, J Steven Richardson and Jeffrey Donat; International Journal of Neuroscience, 1994, Vol. 76, No. 1-2, pp. 61-69
Funded By: University of Saskatchewan, Canada
Conclusion/Findings: Shows that in susceptible individuals, certain foods or additives, including aspartame, can trigger movement disorders through an action on dopamine and other neurotransmitter pathways in the brain.
Hyperlink to Study: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00207459408985992

23. Year Published: 1995
Full Reference: Effects of Aspartame on 45 CA Influx and LDH Leakage from Nerve Cells in Culture, Sonnewald U, Unsgard G, Petersen SB; Neuropharmacology and Neurotoxicology, 1995, Vol. 6, Issue 2
Funded By: Research Council of Norway
Conclusion/Findings: Showed signs of severe cell damage and other neurological events with aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://journals.lww.com/neuroreport/Abstract/1995/01000/Effects_of_aspartame_on_45Ca_influx_and_LDH.23.aspx

24. Year Published: 1996
Full Reference: Increasing Brain Tumor Rates: Is There A Link to Aspartame? JW Olney, Nuri B Farber, et al.; Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology, Nov. 1996, Vol. 55, Issue 11
Funded By: NIH
Conclusion/Findings: Evidence implicates aspartame as a causative agent of high incidence of brain tumors in aspartame-fed rats.
Hyperlink to Study: http://journals.lww.com/jneuropath/Abstract/1996/11000/Increasing_Brain_Tumor_Rates__Is_There_a_Link_to.2.aspx

25. Year Published: 1998
Full Reference: Formaldehyde Derived from Dietary Aspartame Binds to Tissues Components in Vivo, C. Trocho, R. Pardo, I. Rafecas, et al
Funded By: University of Barcelona, Spain
Conclusion/Findings: Showed that aspartame consumption may constitute a hazard because of its contribution to the formation of formaldehyde adducts.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.wnho.net/formaldehyde_from_aspartame.pdf
Health Problem: Headache/Migraines

26. Year Published: 1985
Full Reference: Aspartame: Possible Effect on Seizure Susceptibility. Wurtman, RJ. Lancet. Vol. 2, no. 8463, 1060 p. 1985
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Woman who drank large amounts of Diet Coke and other aspartame-flavored beverages experienced headaches, nausea, visual hallucinations, and a grand-mal seizure.
Hyperlink to Study: http://md1.csa.com/partners/viewrecord.php?requester=gs&collection=ENV&recid=1354938&q=Aspartame%3A+Possible+Effects+on+Seizure+Suspectibility&
uid=789675711&setcookie=yes

27. Year Published: 1987
Full Reference: The Effect of Aspartame on Migraine Headache. Shirley M. Koehler, Alan Glaros. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain. Vol 28, Issue 1, Nov. 12, 1987
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Ingestion of aspartame by migraine sufferers causes significant increases in headache frequency
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119449495/abstract

28. Year Published: 1998
Full Reference: Aspartame as a Dietary Trigger of Headache. Richard B. Lipton, MD, Lawrence C. Newman, MD, Joel S. Cohen, MD, Seymour Solomon, MD. The Journal of Head and Face Pain. Vol. 29, Issue 2, pp. 90-92. Sept. 1998
Funded By
Conclusion/Findings: Finds that aspartame may be an important dietary trigger of headache in some people.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119429393/abstract

29. Year Published: 1991
Full Reference: Platelet Glycine, Glutamate and Aspartate in Primary Headache, D’Andrea, G., et al., 1991. Cephalalgia, Vol. 11, pp. 197-200.
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: High levels of these amino acids were found in patients with migraine with aura compared to normal subjects and other headache groups
Hyperlink to Study: http://cep.sagepub.com/content/11/4/197.abstract

30. Year Published: 1997
Full Reference: Chewing Gum Headaches, Blumenthal, H.J., D.A. Vance, Headache, Volume 37, Number 10, pages 665-666. 1997
Funded By: Department of Neurology, University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Tulsa
Conclusion/Findings: Chewing gum with aspartame provokes headaches
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119166706/abstract

31. Year Published: 2003
Full Reference: The Diet Factor in Pediatric and Adolescent Migraine, Millichap JG, Yee MM. Pediatric Neurology, 2003 Jan;28(1):9-15
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame is one of the substances that trigger migraines in children and adolescents
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.drcordas.com/education/Headaches/1doc.pdf

32. Year Published: 1994
Full Reference: Aspartame Ingestion and Headaches: a Randomized Crossover Trial. S. K. Van Den Eeden, PhD, T. D. Koepsell, MD, MPH, W. T. Longstreth, Jr., MD, MPH, G. van Belle, PhD, J. R. Daling, PhD and B. McKnight, PhD, American Academy of Neurology, Neurology. 1994;44:1787
Funded By: University of Washington
Conclusion/Findings: This experiment provides evidence that, among individuals with self-reported headaches after ingestion of aspartame, a subset of this group report more headaches when tested under controlled conditions. It appears that some people are particularly susceptible to headaches caused by aspartame and may want to limit their consumption.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/44/10/1787?ijkey=4b59bcfcba6c01af70844762469ca00f7f358c5f&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

33. Year Published: 1990
Full Reference: The Concept of Migraine as a State of Central Neuronal Hyperexcitability, KMA Welch, et all, 1990. Headache, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp 817-828.
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Finds that aspartate can cause migraine with aura associated with a state of central neuronal hyperexcitability
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1979655

34. Year Published: 2001
Full Reference: Migraine MLT-Down: An Unusual Presentation of Migraine in Patients with Aspartame-Triggered Headaches. Lawrence C. Newman, Richard B. Lipton, Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, Vol. 41, Issue 9, pp. 899-901
Funded By: The Headache Institute, St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York
Conclusion/Findings: Reports that aspartame may trigger headaches in susceptible individuals, and can worsen an ongoing attack of migraine.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120697481/abstract

35. Year Published: 1988
Full Reference: Aspartame as a Dietary Trigger of Headache, Richard B. Lipton, Lawrence C. Newman, Joel S. Cohen, Seymour Solomon, Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, Vol. 29, Issue 2, pp. 90-92
Funded By: Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
Conclusion/Findings: Reports that some patients with migraines reported aspartame as a trigger three times more often than those with other types of headache.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119429393/abstract
________________________________________
Health Problem: Increase in hunger, body weight, BMI

36. Year Published: 1991
Full Reference: Chen, L. N., and Parham, E. S. “College Students’Use of High-Intensity Sweeteners Is Not Consistently Associated with Sugar Consumption.” J Am Diet Assoc. 91(1991): 686–90
Funded By: Department of Human and Family Resources at Northern Illinois University
Conclusion/Findings: In a study of high-intensity artificial sweeteners performed on college students, there was no evidence that artificial sweetener use was associated with a decrease in their overall sugar intake. These results indicate that eating arti¬ficial sweeteners simply perpetuates a craving for sweets, and overall sugar consumption is not reduced—leading to further problems controlling your weight
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2040783

37. Year Published: 2005
Full Reference: “New Analysis Suggests ‘Diet Soda Paradox’ – Less Sugar, More Weight.” UT Health Center San Antonio Press Release. June 14, 2005 • Volume: XXXVIII • Issue: 24
Funded By: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Conclusion/Findings: In 2005, data gathered from the 25-year long San Antonio Heart Study also showed that drinking diet soft drinks increased the likelihood of serious weight gain – far more so than regular soda.
According to Sharon Fowler, M.P.H:
“On average, for each diet soft drink our participants drank per day, they were 65 percent more likely to become overweight during the next seven to eight years, and 41 percent more likely to become obese.”
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.uthscsa.edu/hscnews/singleformat2.asp?newID=1539

38. Year Published: 2004
Full Reference: “A Pavlovian Approach to the Problem of Obesity,” Davidson, TL and Swithers Se, International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 2004 Jul;28(7):933-5.
Funded By: Department of Psychological Science, Ingestive Behavior Research Center, Purdue University
Conclusion/Findings: Found that rats fed artificially sweetened liquids ate more high-calorie food than rats fed high-caloric sweetened liquids. The researchers believe the experience of drinking artificially sweetened liquids disrupted the animals’ natural ability to compensate for the calories in the food.
Hyperlink to Study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=933%5Bpage%5D+AND+2004/07%5Bpdat%5D+AND+Davidson%5Bauthor%5D&cmd=detailssearch

39. Year Published: 1988
Full Reference: Uncoupling Sweet Taste and Calories, Comparison of Glucose and Three Intense Sweeteners on Hunger and Food Intake. Peter J. Rogers, Jo-ASnne Carlyle, Andrew J. Hill and John E. Blundell. Physiology & Behavior. Vol. 43; Issue 5, 1988. pp. 547-552
Funded By: Biopsychology Group, Psychology Dept., University of Leeds, Leeds UK
Conclusion/Findings: Intense sweeteners can produce significant changes in appetite, with aspartame causing the most pronounced effects.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3200909

40. Year Published: 1990
Full Reference: Oral Stimulation with Aspartame Increases Hunger, Michael G. Tordoff and Annette M. Alleva, Physiology & Behavior, Vol. 47, Issue 3, March 1990; pp. 555-559.
Funded By: Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia
Conclusion/Findings: Showed that aspartame can increase the feeling of hunger
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2359769

41. Year Published: 2010
Full Reference: Gain Weight by “Going Diet?” Artificial Sweeteners and the Neurobiology of Sugar Cravings. Qing Yang, Yale Journal of Biological Medicine, 2010 June; 83(2): 101-108. Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Funded By: Yale University
Conclusion/Findings: Several large scale prospective cohort studies found positive correlation between artificial sweetener use and weight gain. When matched for initial body mass index (BMI), gender, ethnicity, and diet, drinkers of artificially sweetened beverages consistently had higher BMIs. Similar observations have been reported in children. Artificial sweeteners, precisely because they are sweet, encourage sugar craving and sugar dependence.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892765/?tool=pubmed
________________________________________
Other Health Problems: Multiple symptoms including retinal damage, disruption of odor-associated learning, miscellaneous toxicity problems, elevations in plasma, pre-term delivery, rise in serum methanol

42. Year Published: 1985
Full Reference: A Metabolite of Aspartame Inhibits Angiotensin Converting Enzyme. Grobelny D, Galardy RE. Biochemical & BioPhysical Research Communications. 1985: 128(2):960-964.
Funded By: University of Kentucky
Conclusion/Findings: Possibility exists that consuming large amounts of aspartame inhibits angiotensin converting enzyme
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2986632

43. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Serum Methanol Concentrations in Rats and in Men after a Single Dose of Aspartame,” Davoli, E., et al., 1986. Food and Chemical Toxicology, Vol. 24, No. 3, pp. 187-189
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Both treatments caused a temporary rise in serum methanol. Methanol is a highly toxic alcohol commonly found in automobile windshield washer solvent, gas line antifreeze, copy machine fluid, fuel for small stoves, paint strippers, and as an industrial solvent.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3957170

44. Year Published: 1977
Full Reference: Effect of a Dipeptide, Aspartame, on Lactic Acid Production in Human Whole Saliva. Y. Mishiro and H. Kaneko. Journal of Dental Research, 1977 56(11):1427
Funded By: Nippon Dental University, Japan
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame affects levels of saliva lactation and pH levels.
Hyperlink to Study: http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/56/11/1427.full.pdf

45. Year Published: 2010
Full Reference: Intake of Artificially Sweetened Soft Drinks and Risk of Preterm Delivery: a Prospective Cohort Study of 59,334 Danish Pregnant Women. Halldorsson TI, Strom M, Petersen SB, Olsen SF, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 30, 2010
Funded By: Center for Fetal Programming, Division of Epidemiology, Statens serum Institute, Denmark
Conclusion/Findings: There was an association between intake of artificially sweetened carbonated and noncarbonated soft drinks and an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20592133

46. Year Published: 1987
Full Reference: Effects of Oral Aspartame on Plasma Phenylalanine in Humans and Experimental Rodents, RJ Wurtman and TJ Maher. Journal of Neural Transmission, Vol. 70, Nos. 1-2, March 1987, pp. 169-173
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame causes greater elevations in plasma phenylalanine than plasma tyrosine in humans.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.springerlink.com/content/l148w94568vt33hw/

47. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Acute Effects of Aspartame on Systolic Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats. P.J. Kiritsy and T.J. Maher. Journal of Neural Transmission, Vol 66, No. 2, June 1986, pp 121-128
Funded By: Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Dept. of Pharmacology, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Science, Boston
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame elevates blood and brain tyrosine levels, and cause neurochemical changes that lead to tyrosine-induced drop in blood pressure.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p33231m752721l5x/?p=41116b2cb5284004987aaa24f8a945c9&pi=37

48. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Aspartame-Induced Uricaria. Anthony Kulczycki Jr., M.D. Annals of Internal Medicine. Feb. 1, 1986. Volv 104. No 2. pp. 207-208
Funded By: Grant support NIH.
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame-induced urticaria confirmed by double-blind challenge.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.annals.org/content/104/2/207.extract

49. Year Published: 1989
Full Reference: Behavioral Assessment of the Toxicity of Aspartame, Mark D. Holder, Pharmacology Biochemistry & Behavior, Vol. 32, pp. 17-26
Funded By: Memorial University of Newfoundland
Conclusion/Findings: Found that aspartame may have adverse effects when intrapeitoneally injected.
Hyperlink to Study: http://pluto.huji.ac.il/~msrazy/PDF/HolderPBB89.pdf

50. Year Published: 1989
Full Reference: Impaired Performance on Odor-Aversion Testing Following Prenatal Aspartame Exposure in the Guinea Pig, Diana L. Dow-Edwards, Louise A. Scribani and Edward P. Riley, Neuurotoxicity and Teratology, Vol. 11, Issue 4, July-August 1989, pp. 413-416
Funded By: Dept. of Neurosurgery State University, New York
Conclusion/Findings: These data indicate that aspartame exposure at 500 mg/kg throughout gestation disrupts odor-associative learning in 15-day-old guinea pigs.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2796897

51. Year Published: 2006
Full Reference: Aspartame Products as a Potential Danger to Infants, Children & Future Generations, Dr. HJ Roberts, director, Palm Beach Institute for Medical Research
Funded By: No funding
Conclusion/Findings: Aspartame causes a variety of disease in children including headaches, convulsions, unexplained visual loss, rashes, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, obesity, marked weight loss, hypoglycemia, diabetes, addiction (probably largely due to the methyl alcohol), hyperthyroidism, and a host of neuropsychiatric features. The latter include extreme fatigue, irritability, hyperactivity, depression, antisocial behavior (including suicide), poor school performance, the deterioration of intelligence, and brain tumors.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.rense.com/general70/duut.htm

52. Year Published: 1986
Full Reference: Plasma Amino Acid Levels After Single Dose Aspartame Consumption in Phenylketonuria Mild II Hyperphenylalaninemia and Heterozygous State for Phenylkeonuria. The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 109, No. 4, pp. 668-671, October 1986.Benjamin Caballero, Barbara E. Mahon, Frances J. Rohr, Harvey L. Levy, and Richard J. Wurtman. M.D
Funded By: MIT
Conclusion/Findings: Plasma phenylalanine concentrations may increase to unacceptable levels when patients with PKU on phenylalanine-restricted diets consume aspartame-containing soft drinks or after loading doses of the sweetener
Hyperlink to Study: http://wurtmanlab.mit.edu/static/pdf/673.pdf

53. Year Published: 1985
Full Reference: Aspartame-Induced Granulomatous Panniculitis. Nelson Lee Novick, MD. Annals of Internal Medicine., Vol 102, No. 2, pp. 206-207
Funded By: Mt. Sinai Medical Center; New York
Conclusion/Findings: This report describes the first confirmed case of aspartame-induced granulomatous panniculitis
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.annals.org/content/102/2/206.short

54. Year Published: 1984
Full Reference: Aspartame: Methanol and the Public Health. Woodrow C.Monte. Journal Applied Nutrition 36(1):42-54
Funded By
Conclusion/Findings: Consumption of aspartame sweetened drinks at levels commonly used to replace lost fluid during exercise yields methanol intake between 15 and 100 times normal intakes.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.dorway.com/wmonte.txt

55. Year Published: 1989
Full Reference: Excitoxins: A Possible New Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Ischemic Retinal Damage, George H. Bresnick, Archives of Opthalmology, 1989; 107(3):339-341
Funded By: NIH
Conclusion/Findings: Reports that aspartame is a possible mechanism to cause retinal damage.
Hyperlink to Study: http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/summary/107/3/339

56. Year published: 1987
Full reference: Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations in Normal Adults Administered Aspartame in Capsules or Solution: Lack of Bioequivalence, Lewis D. Stegin, L.J. Filer Jr, E.F. Bell, and E.E. Ziegler, Metabolism Volume 36, Issue 5 May 1987, Pages 507-512
Funded by: Supported in part by a grant-in-aid from G.D. Searle
Conclusion/Findings: The data indicate different plasma phenylalanine and aspartate pharmacokinetics between aspartame in solution and capsule administration of aspartame. Peak plasma phenylalanine levels were significantly higher and were reached significantly earlier when aspartame was administered in solution than when it was administered in capsules. Administration in solution also produced a significantly higher ratio of plasma phenylalanine concentration to the sum of the plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids. Similarly, peak plasma aspartate concentrations were significantly higher and were reached significantly earlier when aspartame was administered in solution.
Hyperlink to study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3574137

57. Year published: 1984
Full reference: Evaluation of Consumer Complaints Related to Aspartame Use, MK Bradstock, MK Serdula, JS Marks, RJ Barnard, NT Crane, PL Remington and FL Trowbridge, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, November 1984, Vol 43, 464-469
Funded by: Division of Nutrition, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Centers for Disease Control
Conclusion/Findings: In some case reports, the symptoms may be attributable to aspartame in commonly-consumed amounts
Hyperlink to study: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/43/3/464
________________________________________
Health Problem: Seizures/Convulsions

58. Year Published: 1987
Full Reference: Possible Neurologic Effects of Aspartame, a Widely Used Food Additive; Timothy J. Maher and Richard J. Wurtman. Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 75, pp 53-57, 1987
Funded By: MIT and Federal Government
Conclusion/Findings: Shows that aspartame can induce seizures
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1474447/pdf/envhper00434-0053.pdf

59. Year Published: 1991
Full Reference: Interspecies and Interstrain Studies on the Increased Susceptibility to Metrazol-Induced Convulsions in Animals given Aspartame, L. Diomede, M. Romano, et al, Milan, Italy, Food and Chemical Toxicology, Vol. 29, Issue 2, 1991; pp. 101-106
Funded By: Istituto di Richerche, Milan, Italy
Conclusion/Findings: Showed that they are more susceptible to convulsions when given higher doses of aspartame
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2010138
Letters and Other Commentary from Health Sources

60. Year Published: 1995
Full Reference: Emerging Facts about Aspartame. Dr. J. Barua, Dr. A Bal. Journal of the Diabetic Association of India. 1995; Vol. 35, No. 4
Funded By: No funding
Conclusion/Findings: Cites numerous studies showing dangers of aspartame
Hyperlink to Study: http://basichealthinfo.weebly.com/uploads/4/2/5/9/425984/article-on-aspartame.pdf

61. Year Published: 2004
Full Reference: Aspartame: An FDA-Approved Epidemic, HJ Roberts, Palm Beach Institute for Medical Research.
Funded By: No funding
Conclusion/Findings: Cites thousands of consumer complaints to the FDA that include serious adverse events, that the FDA and CDC refused to acknowledge as substantive.

62. Year Published: 1991
Full Reference: Recurrent Vulvovaginitis Resulting from Heavy Dietary Use of Aspartame, Strathman I, The Journal of Reproductive Medicine. 1991 Aug;36(8):572
Funded By: No funding
Conclusion/Findings: (This is a letter; title implies that vulvovaginitis was triggered by heavy use of aspartame)
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1941798

63. Year Published: 1985
Full Reference: Interaction of Aspartame and Carbohydrates in an Eating Disordered Patient. Ferguson A Jr. A Letter in the American Journal of Psychiatry. 1985, Feb. 142(2):271
Funded By: Not applicable
Conclusion/Findings: Reports a clinical case where aspartame combined with carbohydrates causes headaches and other symptoms typical of elevated CNS level of tyrosine.
Hyperlink to Study: http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=162185

64. Year Published: 1995
Full Reference: A Health Alert: Emerging Facts About Aspartame, Dr. J Barua, Dr. A Bal, The Journal of the Diabetic Association of India, 1995: Vol. 35, No. 4
Funded By: No funding
Conclusion/Findings: This article summarizes a number of other people’s studies on aspartame.
Hyperlink to Study: http://smfi.is/media/misc/article-on-aspartame.pdf

65. Year Published: 1996
Full Reference: Aspartame as a Cause of Allgeric Reactions, Including Anaphylaxis, Archives of Internal Medicine, 1996; 156(9):1027
Funded By: Not known
Conclusion/Findings: Letter arguing that aspartame should have been included as a causative agent of allergic reactions. Cites FDA 7,300-person database of complaints.
Hyperlink to Study: http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/summary/156/9/1027-a

66. Year Published: Updated April 23, 2008
Full Reference: Is Aspartame Safe? From an FDA Q&A about aspartame
Funded By: Not applicable
Conclusion/Findings: While denying that aspartame is an allergen, the FDA says: However, certain people with the genetic disease phenylketonuria (PKU), those with advanced liver disease, and pregnant women with hyperphenylalanine (high levels of phenylalanine in blood) have a problem with aspartame because they do not effectively metabolize the amino acid phenylalanine, one of aspartame’s components. High levels of this amino acid in body fluids can cause brain damage. Therefore, FDA has ruled that all products containing aspartame must include a warning to phenylketonurics that the sweetener contains phenylalanine.
Hyperlink to Study: http://answers.hhs.gov/questions/3011

67. Year published:
Full reference: Scientific Abuse in Methanol/Formaldehyde Research Related to Aspartame
Funded by: no funding
Conclusion/Findings: Exposes studies “proving” safety of aspartame as deceptive, erroneous, and based on industry research using outdated plasma methanol measuring tests. No date of publication.
Hyperlink to Study: http://thetruthaboutstuff.com/pdf/%2847%29%20Scientific%20Abuse%20in%20Methanol.pdf
________________________________________
Health Problem: Cancer

68. Year published: 2010
Full reference:Aspartame administered in feed, beginning prenatally through life span, induces cancers of the liver and lung in male Swiss mice. American Journal of Industrial Medicine December 2010; 53(12): 1197-1206
Conclusion/Findings:The results of the present study confirm that [aspartame] is a carcinogenic agent in multiple sites in rodents, and that this effect is induced in two species, rats (males and females) and mice (males). Autopsies revealed a significantly increased risk of liver and lung cancer.
Hyperlink to Study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20886530

CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

World Population 7.3 Billion – Population Pyramid

WORLD POPULATION PYRAMID

http://populationpyramid.net/world/2015/

World Population: 7.324.782.000 (7.3 Billion) | 2015

A population pyramid, also called an age pyramid or age picture diagram, is a graphical illustration that shows the distribution of various age groups in a population (typically that of a country or region of the world), which forms the shape of a pyramid when the population is growing.[1] It is also used in ecology to determine the overall age distribution of a population; an indication of the reproductive capabilities and likelihood of the continuation of a species.

It typically consists of two back-to-back bar graphs, with the population plotted on the X-axis and age on the Y-axis, one showing the number of males and one showing females in a particular population in five-year age groups (also called cohorts). Males are conventionally shown on the left and females on the right, and they may be measured by raw number or as a percentage of the total population.

Population pyramids are often viewed as the most effective way to graphically depict the age and sex distribution of a population, partly because of the very clear image these pyramids present.[2]

A great deal of information about the population broken down by age and sex can be read from a population pyramid, and this can shed light on the extent of development and other aspects of the population. A population pyramid also tells how many people of each age range live in the area. There tends to be more females than males in the older age groups, due to females’ longer life expectancy.

In many countries, the government plans the economy in such a way that the working population can support these dependents. This number can be further used to calculate the dependency ratio in that population.

Population pyramids can be used to observe the natural increase, birth, and death rate.

Reference:

1.) Population pyramids of the world from 1950 to 2050

2.) Department of Health Home

 

 

Compliments:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Read a Book a Day

Read a Book a Day

Tai Lopez explains how to read a book a day, often within 10 -30 minutes.
He reads a book a day having read over 50,000 books. Did not graduate
from college and earns in the millions. What are you waiting for? Christmas?

BIGGEST MYTH: Read a book start to finish.

Skim a book 3 X.

SPEED READING RULES
#1 : Skim the book for 1-2 minutes (Overview)
#2 : Power Skim first few pages, table of contents, mark pages for 5-10 minutes
#3 : Deep Skim Read for 1 to 3 golden nuggets; the knowledge of Why the Book was written. Memorize the Single Golden Nugget. Read the end of Chapter Summaries, the summation of the book.
#4 : Use Books As Reference Guide, re-read as needed or as resource documentation.

more info: TaiLopez.com

This is part of The LEADERSHIP SERIES.

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

 

 

EQ – Reframing – Unconditional Positive Self Regard

Unconditional Positive Regard

Published on Oct 13, 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Michelle shares her personal journey towards Unconditional Positive Regard and self acceptance through the lens of parenting. This is a story about relationships and ultimately the relationship you have with yourself.

Michelle Charfen has had a lifelong passion for learning. She was fascinated by the human body and from an early age dreamed of becoming a physician. In high school, she began tutoring students, discovering a love of facilitating learning for others as well. She would eventually study Human Biology as an undergraduate at Stanford, teach preschool during the summer vacations, and spend the year after graduation teaching at an elementary school in East Palo Alto.

Michelle’s childhood dream was finally realized upon attending Harvard Medical School. She then completed a residency in Emergency Medicine at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, followed by a research fellowship during which she obtained a Masters of Epidemiology from the School of Public Health at UCLA. Teaching medical students and residents in an academic environment was perfectly suited to her enthusiasm for constant learning. In 2008, she stepped down from her faculty position as an Assistant Professor at the UCLA School of Medicine to devote this period of life to her growing family while continuing to work part time in Emergency Medicine.

Her personal journey, struggles, and successes as a parent organically led to an interest in supporting other families. Michelle completed the Parent Educator Certification Program through Echo Parenting and Education, and now combines this training with her previous experience and knowledge to help others learn effective tools for compassionate communication.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

1. Slow Down
2. Be Gentle With Yourself
3. Walking Towards What You Want
4. Accept Myself No Matter What
5. Embrace Mind Change Concept

Emotional Intelligence = EI = Emotional Quotient = EQ

Find out your EQ by taking the MHS EQ-i 2.0 Assessment
and learn where you are. Then embrace change and grow into the new improved you!

Richard Taylor will coach you into better skills sets:

EQ-i2.0 Model

EQ-i2.0 Model

EQ-i 2.0 Scales

EQ-i 2.0 Scales

 

  • Self Regard
  • Self Actualization
  • Emotional Self Awareness
  • Emotional Expression
  • Assertiveness
  • Independence
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Empathy
  • Social Responsibility
  • Problem Solving
  • Reality Testing
  • Impulse Control
  • Flexibility
  • Stress Tolerance
  • Optimism

CONTACT IN ATLANTA:

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

If You Want To Ruin A Relationship-Keep Texting!

Sage Advice From Cherokee Billie.

Stop Texting To Save Your Relationship.

 

ATLANTA HELP – CONTACT

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence

Ralph Smart Anxiety Wisdom

Ralph Smart Anxiety Wisdom

ANXIETY

Instagram: infinitewaters
http://www.ralphsmart.com
Feel Alive by Ralph Smart. The New Book Now Available Below:
http://www.ralphsmart.com/index.php/t…
My Website: http://ralphsmart.com
Personal Consultations.: http://www.ralphsmart.com/index.php/1…
Instagram: infinitewaters
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/infinitewate…

CONTACT:

Director Richard Taylor BS, CAMF
Certified Anger Management Facilitator
Diplomate American Association Anger Management Providers

Atlanta Anger Management
5555 Glenridge Connector
Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Atlanta, Georgia 30342 USA

Office Phone: 678-576-1913
Fax: 1-866-551-1253
Web: http://www.atlantaangermanagement.com
E-mail: richardtaylor5555@gmail.com

Linked in: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardtayloraam

#1 Certified Anderson and Anderson™ Anger Management Provider
The Best Of The Best In Anger Management & Emotional Intelligence